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WAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY 

THE Z. SMITH REYNOLDS LIBRARY 







CALL NO. 




1911-1920 



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MINUTES 

OF THE 

SEVENTY-FIRST ANNUAL SESSION 

OF THE 

GREEN RIVER 
BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

HELD WITH 

MOUNTAIN CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH 

RUTHERFORD COUNTY, N. C. 

SEPT. 28, 29, 30, AND OCT. 1, 

1911 




Next Session will be Held With Bill's Greek Baptist Church. Twelve Miles West of 
Rutherfordton, Beginning on Thursday Before the First Sunday in October, 1912. 



MINUTES 

OF THE 

SEVENTY-FIRST ANNUAL SESSION 

OF THE 

GREEN RIVER 
BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

HELD WITH 

MOUNTAIN Creek Baptist Church 

RUTHERFORD COUNTY, N. C. 

SEPT. 28, 29, 30, AND OCT. 1, 

191 1 



Next Session will be Held With Bill's Creek Baptist Church. Twelve Miles West of 
Rutherfordton, Beginning on Thursday Before the First Sunday in October, 1912. 



LOFTIN & CO., PRINTERS, 
GASTONIA, N.C. 






OFFICERS. 

Elder D. J. Hunt, Moderator Union Mills, N. C. 

A. L. Rucker, Clerk Rutherfordton, N. C. 

Mai. H. Jones, Treasurer Rutherfordton, N, C. 



ORDAINED MINISTERS. 

Arledge, J. B Saluda, N. C. 

Buchanon, E Black Mountain, N. C. 

Champion, R, C Landrum, S. C. 

Croom, H. M Old Fort, N. C. 

Denton. J. R Dysartsville, N. C. 

Freeman, H. R Uree, R, i., N. C. 

Harris, B. B Dysartsville, N. C. 

Haney, J. F Black Mountain, N. C. 

Haynes, W. L Gilkey, N. C. 

Herring, R. H Rutherfordton, N. C. 

Huggins, F. M Union Mills, N. C. 

Hunt, D. J Union Mills, N. C. 

Jackson, B. P Bright, N. G. 

Laughter, B. C Bob, N. C. 

Long, Edward Marion, N. C. 

Loudermilk, D. P . Marion, N. C. 

McMahan, W. F. . '. Sunny Vale, N. C. 

Mashburn, A. B. Nealsville, N. C. 

Nanney, J. H Union Mills, N. C. 

Sorrells, A. P Nebo, N. C. 

Weaver, G. H Nebo, N. C. 

Whiteside, Z. T Uree, N. C. 

Whiteside, J. R Uree, N. C. 

Marley, H. C Old Fort, N. C. 



PROCEEDINGS. 



Mountain Crkek Baptist Church, 
Rutherford County, N. C, Thursday, Sept. 28, 19 11. 

The seventy-first annual session of the Green River Baptist 
Association convened with this church at 11 a. m. to-day. 

The exercises began by singing "Nearer my God to thee", 
followed by an earnest invocation by Judge M. H. Justice. 

Elder R. H. Herring read the nth chapter of Proverbs. 

In the absence of Elder T. H. Posey who had left the As- 
sociation, and his alternate, Elder J. R. Whiteside not yet 
arrived on the grounds. Elder Herring preached the opening 
or introductory sermon from Proverbs 11:30. 

Prayer was offered by Elder M. L. Kesler, Superintendent 
of the Thomasville Orphanage. 

Announcements, the assignments of homes to church 
messengers, and the official recognition by Moderator, D. J. 
Hunt, followed: Elder M. L. Kesler, Supt. of Thomasville 
Orphanage; Prof. G. E. Lineberry, financial field agent of 
Meredith College; Elder A. E. Betts, travelling representative 
for the Biblical Recorder; and Elder E- G. L. Taylor, a 
messenger from the Piedmont Association. 

A recess of one hour was taken for dinner. 

Benediction, Elder A. P. Sorrels. 

AFTERNOON SESSION. 

The Association re-assembled at 1:15 p. m. and was called 
to order by the Moderator. 

Prayer, Elder L. G. E. Taylor, leading. 

A. L. Rucker was chosen clerk, pro tempore. Vice D. E. 
Carlton, de facto clerk, not present. 



WAKE FO««ST UMWHRm 
UBRARV 



Minutes of the 



The Moderator, and pastor of this church, D. J. Hunt, ex- 
tended to delegates and visitors a cordial welcome to our de- 
liberations and to our homes. 

A quorum of the delegates being present from twenty-six of 
the forty-three churches at the morning session with other 
additions in the afternoon, Elder Edward Eong moved that 
the rules be suspended, and that Elder D. J. Hunt be re- 
elected Moderator by acclamation. The motion was carried 
unanimously. Moderator Hunt feelingly responds. 

In like manner, A. E. Rucker was elected Clerk, and Mai 
H, Jones, re-elected Treasurer by a unanimous vote. 

Messengers were enrolled from the churches as given below: 

Armstrong: — Elder W. F. McMahan, 

BktheIv:— George Crawford, J. H. Morris. 

Bethlehem: — J. T. Lail, A.. W. GiUiam. 

BEUiyAH:— George Champion. 

Big LeveIv:— H. H. McCrane, J. J. Price. 

Bill's Creek:— F. L. Flynn, J. C. McDaniel, L. W. McDaniel, D. T. 
Frady. 

Camp Creek: — Zeno C. Clements, J. C. Guffy. 

Cane Creek: — J. P. Harris, Wm. Whiteside. 

Chapel Hill:— John Kaylor, B. T. Corpening, B. G. Hensley. 

Cherry Spring:— Elder H. M. Croom, Sam Murphy, W. H. Gilliam. 

Clear Creek: — N. Buchanan. 

Columbus:— J. P. Arlege, N. T. Mills. 
, Cooper's Gap:— J. W. Biddy, J. R. Blanton. 

DysartsvillE: — B. T. Daves. 

Eureka:— Elder Z. T. Whiteside, G. W. Whiteside. 

Glenwood: — L. A. Raburn, J, C. England. 

Hall Town: — John B. Lewis. 

Harmony Grove:— J. B. Lawing, J. A. Hensley, Fletcher Simmons. 

Hickory Grove:— J. C. Stott, C. M. Jones, J. W. Barnett. 

Jesse's Grove: — Mot represented. 

Macedonia;— W. H. Watkins, G. F. Rhom, C. E. Watkins. 

Marion: — Elder Edward Long, N. C. Jones, A. R. Buffalo. 

Mill Spring: — J. J. Lambright, J. M. Lewis. 

Montford's Cave: -J. W. Halford, G. H. Hemphill, E. Parker. 

Mountain Creek: — A. L. Rucker, A. E. Flack, C. S. Lynch, G. B. 
Flynn. 

Mount Lebanon. — Not represented. 

Mount Pleasant. — Represented by letter. 



Green River Baptist Association. 



Mount Vernon. --Z. B. Freeman, Ed. Morgan, W. N. S. Rollins, F. 
O. Lewis, J. C. Ross. 

Mountain View. — N. C. Burgess, J. T. Jackson. 

O1.D Fort.— Elder H. C. Marley, J. Y. Gilliam, J. L. Nichols. 

Pepper's Creek. — Geo. W. Jones, James Washburn. 

PiNEY Knob. — P. L. Hensley, John Achley. 

P1.EASAISIT Grove. — R. Ledbetter, M. L. Haynes. 

P1.EASANT HiLi,. — D. C. Nanney, C. C. Lovelace, Sr., T. H. Ferree, 
John Sane, Pink White. 

Rock Spring. — W. H. Ledbetter, John W. Lattimore. 

Round Hili..— Elder D. J. Hunt, Elder F. M. Huggins, J. D. Morris. 
C. J. Flack, John Alley, E. L. Morvis. 

Round Knob. — Not represented. 

RUTHERFORDTON. — Elder R. H. Herring, M. H. Justice, R. P. Geer. 
R. p. Scruggs, Jr., G. W. Hodge, N. E.Walker J. P. Jones. 

Silver Creek. — Not represented. 

Stone Mountain. — Not represented. 

Sunny Vai.e. — Elder W. F. McMahan, W. M. Johnson, J, W. Johnson, 

Turkey Cove. — Not represented. 

Walnut Grove.— Not represented. 

Whiteside Valley. — Elder J. R. Whiteside, Guilford Nanney. 

Zion Hill.— J. M. Pendergrass, David Simpson. 

Of the forty-five churches named thirty-.seven were re- 
presented by both letters and delegates, one by letter only, and 
seven were not represented in any way. 

The Moderator here announced committees on Finance, State 
of Religion, State Missions, Home Missions, Foreign Missions, 
Sabbath Schools, Temperance, Religious Education and Round 
Hill Academy, Thomasville Orphanage, Aged Ministers Relief, 
Nominations to State and Southern Baptist Conventions, 
Time, place and introductory sermon at the next session, To 
fill vacancies of Round Hill Trustees, Digest of Church Letters, 
and Woman's Work. 

Since these appear in the reports submitted later in the 
session, they need no repetition here. 

Under call for new membership Pepper's Creek and Arm- 
strong churches presented letters desiring admission into the 
Green River Association. Elders R. H. Herring, A. P. 
Sorrels and Edward Long were appointed to examine the 



Minutes of the 



Constitutions and Articles of Faith of these churches and to 
report their findings to this body later. 

Elder A. P. Sorrels read the 

REPORT ON ORPHANAGE. 

The Orphanage at Thomasville is owned, controlled and fostered by 
the Baptists of North Carolina. We desire to be like Jesus, the Christ, 
in caring for those who are left in the world without father and mother. 

Our Orphanage is a great institution — great for what it is doing for the 
fatherless children committed to its care, bodily, mentally and spiritually 
— great in stimulating and inspiring us through the weekly visits of 
Charity and Children to a proper conception of our duties respecting 
the education and training of our own children — great for what it has 
done and is doing for the churches of the state and beyond its limits. 

Charity and Children appeals to us in a sympathetic and convincing 
way, and compelling us to give liberally and freely, by multiplying our 
desires to be helpful. 

We recommend that the custom of taking collections in the Sunday 
Schools be continued and extended; that a club of Charity and 
Children be taken by every school; and further, that Thanksgiving 
day be observed by a special thank offering by every church. In 
churches where this is not convenient, we suggest that the Sunday near- 
est Thanksgiving be set aside for this purpose. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

A. P. Sorrels, Ch. ^ 

J. M. Pkndkrgrass V Committee 

David Simpson j 

On motion to adopt. Elder A. P. Sorrels introduced Elder 
M. L. Kesler, Supt. of the Thomasville Orphanage, who spoke 
to the report for more than an hour. After securing the 
subjoined pledges the report was adopted. 

Bethel $12.00; Bethlehem $12.00; Bill's Creek $5.00; Camp 
Creek $4.00; Cane Creek $3.00; Chapel Hill $12.00; Cherry 
Spring $10.00; Clear Creek $15.00; Columbus $15.00; Coopers 
Gap $3.00; Dysartsville $15.00; Eureka $3.00; Glenwood, 
$10.00; Hall Town $3.00; Harmony Grove $6.00; Macedonia, 
$2.00; Marion $60.00; Mill Spring, $10.00; Montford's Cave, 
$8.00; Mtn. Creek $20.00; Mount Vernon $25.00; Old Fort 
$20.00; Piney Knob $2.00; Pleasant Grove $6.00; Pleasant 
Hill $5.oc; Rock Spring, $4.10, paid; Round Hill, $30.00- 



Green River Baptist Association. 



Rutherfordton $100.00; Sunny Vale $2.00; Whiteside Valley 
$2.70; Ziou Hill $6.00: Beulah $2.00. Total, $430.80. 

Prof. G. K. Lineberry discussed the great need of the pro- 
posed $150,000 endowment fund to Meredith College. 

Miles P. Flack read the report on the Biblical Recorder, 
which, by an amendment passed by the body, takes the 
place of former reports on Periodicals. 

The report follows: 

REPORT ON BIBLICAL RECORDER. 

The value of the press as a means of informing and moulding public 
opinion and its influence upon all modern societies will, we think, be 
questioned by no one. The Biblical Recorder shares with the preacher, 
teacher and the public orator in the great task of reaching the minds and 
touching the hearts of mankind. While its power is not so deep and in- 
tense as that of the preacher or the teacher; it is more persistent and far 
reaching. 

The basis of our civilization is popular education. Today a large num- 
ber of our citizens make up their opinions upon important questions from 
information got from the press. Upon these opinions they must act 
should a crisis arise. If the information is false and leads to erroneous 
opinions the consequence may be perilous. As much of our education 
is limited to information supplied by the press, and often this is of such 
a character that it is not sufficient foundation on which to build a solid 
enduring civilization, we should be very careful in selecting the read- 
ing matter for our children and ourselves. 

Reading is one of the m.ost essential acts in our preparation for the 
higher and most responsible duties of life. The truly cultured are those 
who by their training of the head, hand and heart, have learned to ap- 
preciate the opportunities of life, and know how to be helpful, happy 
and efficient members of all societies for the betterment of mankind. 

It is necessary that our people be informed concerning the various 
enterests fostered by our conventions. The pledges for the various ob- 
jects will be enlarged and paid only in proportion to the knowledge that 
our brethren and sisters have of the needs and progress of the work. 
That this knowledge may be known among us we commend the Biblical 
Recorder, which has faithfully served the Baptist cause for nearlj^ four- 
score years. It is now better able to serve the cause than ever before. 
Better fitted to keep you in touch with our men and our work. A copy 
of this paper should be in every Baptist home in North Carolina. 

Committee, M11.ES P. Flack 

C. S. Lynch 
A. E. Flack 
G. B, Flynn 



Minutes of the 



On motion to adopt Elder A. L. Betts, P'ield Representative 
of the Biblical Recorder, discussed the questions involved 
when it was adopted. 

Elder R. H. Herring submitted an order of business cover- 
ing the entire session which was adopted and closely adhered 
to by the Moderator. It needs no repetition here, since sub- 
sequent proceedings were almost wholely governed by this 
order. 

On motion, adjourned to 9:30 tomorrow. 

Benediction, Elder R. H. Herring. 

MORNING SESSION. 

Friday, September 29, 191 1. 

The Association met at 9:30 and was called to order by the 
presiding officer. 

Elder H. M. Croom read 122nd Psalm in opening the devo- 
tional exercises, prayer being offered by Elder L. G. L. Tay- 
lor in their conclusion. 

Minutes of yesterday read by the Clerk, and stood approved. 

On motion of Elder R. H. Herring it was ordered that 
the list of church messengers composing this body be recalled 
tomorrow morning, and that the names of absentees be strick- 
en from the roll. 

It was, on motion, ordered that all subsequent reports 
on Periodicals be hereafter designated as reports on Biblical 
Recorder. 

On call of Moderator for Associational Church letters not 
secured on yesterday those of Beulah, Hall Town, and 
Whiteside Valley were handed in and their delegates names 
placed upon the roll. 

Elder R. H. Herring read report below: 
NEW MEMBERSHIP. 

First:— After examining the Articles of Faith and Rules of Decorum 
of Armstrong Baptist Church and finding them Scriptural, we recom- 
mend that they be received into this Association. 



Grkkn River Baptist ASvSociation. 



Second: — We recommend, that the delegates from Pepper's Creek 
Baptist church be seated in the Association, and that final action be defer- 
red until our next meeting, also that the clerk correspond with the 
Mitchell County Association, and get a letter of dismission. 

I R. H. Herring, 
Committee ] A. P. Sorrels, 
i Edward Long. 

The report was adopted, and messengers enrolled. 

Elder W. F. McMaban, pastor of Armstrong Church, and 
George W. Jones and James Washburn representing Peppers 
Creek Church were welcomed to seats among us b}^ the 
Moderator, D. J. Hunt. 

Under regular order, the Sunday School report had not 
been presented, but the writer was allowed to file it later with 
the Clerk for publication. The subject, however, was dis- 
cussed by Elder Edward Long and the Moderator, D. J. Hunt, 
when the missing report received only a tentative adoption. 

Prof. Preston Stringfield was recognized, who came forward 
and read the report on 

WOMAN'S WORK. 

In this good land, and in this progressive age, it is not a strange thing 
that the women are engaged so presistently in mission work. In ancient 
days, except in Biblical history, there was not much mention made of 
women, but the present civilization is bowing down at the shrine of 
noble womanhood, and wherever we hear the name of Christ, we find 
that woman is as Martha was, cumbered with much serving. 

The motto which the Woman's Missionary Union, of North Carolina, 
has is, "Larger Things." Indeed would women be satisfied with any- 
thing less than improvement and advancement in everything she under- 
takes ? In the year 1886 the women of our State started their missionary 
organization. Hence, the woman's work in this state as an organization 
is in its twenty-fifth 3-ear. Remarkable advancement has been made 
from the first. During the first ten years, the receipts were over |i30,ooo. 
Since then the contributions have increased ten fold, that is, in each 
year now the women contribute as much as they did throughout the 
first ten years after organization. Henceforth, the women are calcula- 
ting upon a ten per cent increase each year. The women are to be 
credited for their gifts, but they are doing more than this. Through 
their direct influence, the children^are much interested in missions, as 



10 Minutes of thk 



evidenced by their gifts through the two organizations: Sunbeams, and 
Royal Ambassadors. 

The greatest eulogy ever paid to any one was paid to the woman who 
contributed costly nard to anoint Jesus. Jesus said of her, "She hath 
done what she could." What more could she do? But any man or 
woman is obliged to do whatever he or she can do. Jesus Christ de- 
mands that much of us who claim to be his followers. 

Committee, 

Preston Stringfield, Ch'm. 
M. L. Haynes 
J. L. Nicholas 

Pending motion to adopt, Prof. Preston Stringfield discussed 
the report which was adopted. 

Prof. W. B. Blanton, precentor. Miss I^ela Morris, organist, 
with the Round Hill Academy choir rendered "Coronation " 
and other selections during the day with spirit. 

W. F. Flack read 

REPORT ON EDUCATION. 

Your Committee appreciates the importance of education and is grate- 
ful to the leaders of the cause in our midst. Their heroic efforts and 
self-sacrificing deeds are indisputable proofs for the just and proper 
distinction of education as claimed by the Christian colleges and high 
schools. It is in these Christian Institutions only that true and full 
knowledge is gained. Here passions are restrained, feelings disciplined; 
profound religious thoughts are instilled and pure morality inculcated. 

The printing press brought the Bible to the people and raised them 
from ages of serfdom and today we stand before God as His untrammelled 
children. It gave us books which are to us of far greater service than 
all the material achievements of this wonderful time. 

But a knowledge of these must be gained by study. There must be 
instructors to teach. Necessity gave us our colleges and schools and the 
same forces us to attend these if we are ever wise. It has made the 
Green River Association vitally interested in the Southern Baptist Theo- 
logical Seminary, Wake Forest and Meredith Colleges and Round Hill 
Academy. These are benedictions from heaven tons. 

Our age demands strong men, thoroughly equipped for the great work 
of Christ and we find such in those who take the course at our Theologi- 
cal Seminary at Louisville, Ky. 

The year finds Wake Forest passing the high records of previous years 
in preparing young men for the high duties of life. "By their fruits ye 



Grken River Baptist Association. ii 



shall know them;" then none of the colleges of North Carolina can ex- 
cel Wake Forest in well equipped men for the professional vocations of 
life, when we judge by these standards of excellence. 

Meredi4h College claims our loyal support. It takes the young women 
and finishes the preparation needed to make them efficient workers in 
the great field to which they are called. This influence to the state and 
the denomination and the world is inestimable. We must not forget 
Meredith College, 

But there is no place like home and more than four thousand Baptists 
in Green River Association should think and act for Round Hill Acade- 
my. They should each have a personal pride in this school for it is 
theirs. The parents can help Wake Forest and Meredith by sending 
their boys and girls to Round Hill. There they need to go first; but 
when they have taken the course there, not all will go away but many 
will return to their home churches to work and use the talents made 
bright by their having been brought under the moral and religious in- 
fluence of this high school. 

Here the parents can educate their children at a small cost. The 
school needs your children and they need it. The prospects were never 
so bright as now. There are more boarding students now than have 
ever been at this time of year. The corps of teachers have never been 
excelled. The work is thorough. 

This school is handicapped with a debt; but if it is given the loyal sup- 
port that is due it from every member of this Association it will continue 
to move forward. With the presence and promise of God we can achieve 
the purposes and things for which we are striving, then we should press 
on and never falter or fail. 

Committee, 

W. F. FI.ACK 

N. T. Mills 

G. W. Whitesidk 

J. A. Hensley 

The following was presented by J. D. Morris, Secretary and 
Treasurer. 

REPORT OF ROUND HILL SCHOOL. 

STATISTICAL. 
For the year ending May 6, 191 1. 

No. of teachers employed 5 

" " Pupils enrolled 168 

" " Graduates 12 

" " Ministerial students i 



12 Minutes of the 



FINANCIAI, EXHIBIT. 

By Tuition collected $2,519.14 $ 

" Rents and entertainments . 277.31 

" Check, Home Mission Board 500,00 

To salaries paid Teachers 2,520.00 

" Incidental expenses paid 386.16 

" House rents paid , 72.00 

To amount paid for School Desks • 44- 70 

" " " " Furniture 15105 

" " " '* Wood 66.00 

" " " " Printing . . ' 4710 

By cash on hand to balance 9 24 

Totals .$3,296.45 $3,296.45 

The present term of school has six teachers and 118 students, and is 
doing excellent work. 

R. H. Hkrring. Chairman, Bd. Trustees. 
J. D. Morris, Secretary and Treasurer. 

On request of the chairman, after a motion had been made 
to adopt the two reports given, the time hmit for the discussion 
was extended fifteen minutes, Elder R. H. Herring, chairman 
of the Board of Trustees, Elder D. J. Hunt, the financial field 
agent of the school, Prof. G. E. Lineberry, promoter of our 
secondary schools and colleges, and brethren J. L. Taylor, W. 
F. Flack and J. D. Morris were the speakers in the order 
named. 

Of the $3500 debt against Round Hill Academy $458 was 
secured by notes payable Oct. i, 1912; and a cash collection 
taken, amounting to $20.60. 

Recurring to the motion pending the two combined reports 
were adopted, when a recess of one hour was announced for 
dinner. 

EVENING SESSION. 

The Association re-assembled at 1:30 p. m.. Elder A. P. 
Sorrels, leading us in prayer. 



Green River Baptist Association. 13 

Elder Edward Long submitted the following: 

REPORT ON HOME MISSIONS. 

The work of Home Missions is foundation work. The great task of 
Christianity is to Christianize the world. But this can be done only by 
beginning at home. While Christ said, "Go ye into all the world and 
preach the gospel to every creature," yet he said, "Beginning at Jerusa- 
lem." Our Jerusalem and Samaria are the fair Southland, New Mexico, 
Cuba and the Canal Zone. We must first Christianize America before 
America can Christianize the world. If the Christian spirit does not 
dominate American society, "What we are will thunder so loud that the 
heathen can not hear what we say." Dr. Wm. E. Hatcher says, "To 
slight Home Missions is to grind up the seed corn of a missionary harvest 
among the heathen nations." 

Out of a population of about 92,000,000 in the United States only 
about 20,000.000 are members of evangelical denominations, and of this 
number barely more than one- fourth, or something over 5,000,000 are 
Baptists. While conditions in the South are better than in the North 
yet in the South only thirty-one per cent of our population are members 
of evangelical denominations, six per cent are Catholic and sixty -three 
per cent are not members of any chureh. So long as this condition 
exists can we say that the South is Christian? With all the great work 
that the Home Mission Board has done in the past, still there is a larger 
work to be done in the future. 

Our Home Mission Board does ten classes of mission work, namely, 
aiding weak churches, mountain mission schools, evangelism, city 
missions, church building, supporting workers among foreigners, Indians 
and Negroes, missionaries to Cuba and the Canal Zone. In each one of 
these departments the past year has been a good year. 

Last year the Home Mission Board employed 1,302 missionaries. 150 
of these were maintained wholly by the Home Mission Board, and the 
others by the Board in co-operation with other agencies. The majority 
of these worked among Native Americans. Forty-five worked among 
foreigners, 127 in the mountain schools, eighteen were white evangelists, 
thirty-five Negro evangelists, thirty-four missionaries who supplied 
fifty-six churches and mission stations in Cuba, five missionaries and 
four helpers doing successful work in the Canal Zone, and twenty mis- 
sionaries among the Indians. 

During the present year the Home Board mis.sionaries have baptized 
26,866, received a total number of 49,297 persons into the churches, 
organized 235 churches, built 289 houses of worship and held 243 evan- 
gelistic meetings. 

The Board has fostered or maintained twenty-eight mountain schools 



14 ^IlXUTES OF THE 



wliich had an attendance of 4.500 students, sixty-five of whom were 
ministerial students Eight of these schools are in North Carolina. A 
mission school for Cubans was conducted in Havana, one for Italians in 
Tampa and one for Mexicans in El Paso. 

No mission board in the world has reported results one half as large as 
these. No Home Mission Board in America, so far as we can find, has 
results more than one-third as large, though several expended four times 
as much in the work. 

The receipts from all sources for Home Missions last year were 5344i- 
S95. or a gain of $5,160 for 191 1. 

The average gift per member for this great cause was a fraction more 
than fifteen cents for 1910 and a fraction less than fifteen cents for 191 1. 
So while the total was larger 3'et the average was less. This average is 
low because there are 11.000 Baptist Churches in the Southern Conven- 
tion that give nothing to missions or benevolences. 

Because of the rapidly increasing population of the Southwest, the 
tidal wave of immigrants that is just beginning to pour into the South, 
the rapid growth of the cities of the Southwest and the new and com- 
plex social conditions we need to enlarge our gifts for Home Missions. 

The Board is asking this year for only 1^400,000 when it ought to have 
a million. North Carolina is asking for $26,000. Surely we will give it 
and more. 

Our association gave last year to this object $352 or an average of a 
little over seven cents per member. Certainly ours is as liberal a people 
as is to be found anywhere. Let us then double our subscriptions to this 
object which would only put us on a par with the average Baptist of the 
South. 

For tracts, periodicals, etc. address. Home Mission Board, Austell 
Building, Atlanta, Georgia. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Edward Long 
b. f. corpening 
j. c. guffey 

W. H. GiLEAM 

Pending motion to adopt Elder Edward Long addressed the 
Association. 

Elder R. H. Herring moved that the report be amended by 
resolving to endeavor to raise fifteen cents per member for 
Home Missions this 3'ear, taking no pledges for this object 
from the churches as has been our custom in the past. 

The amendment was adopted when the report as amended 
was adopted. 



Green River Baptist Association. 15 

Judge M. H. Justice read, and pending motion to adopt, 
discussed the report on 

TEMPERANCE. 

The time was, once, in the recent past, when the moral and religious 
people of the State stood helpless in the presence of the manufacturers 
and venders of intoxicating liquors. The inhibition of the Constitution 
against the passage of sumptuary laws, was, by the friends of the traffic, 
constrained to apply to the traffic, and such constant application of that 
principle to that one business was such that we almost forgot that it had 
any other meaning. 

Step by step the people of the State have come to know that the 
manufacture and sale of liquor is all evil in itself, and popular opinion 
ripened to the extent that the entire traffic is prohibited by law, and the 
people are no longer helpless; not only public sentiment but the criminal 
law of the State has come to the relief of a suffering people. 

Liquor is sold to a limited extent by blind tigers, but, if all the good 
people of the State will be active in their communities, that can be easily 
stamped out. Every member of every church in this Association should 
see to it that no blind tiger shall ply the trade in his community. 

Committee, 

M. H, Justice 
W. H. Watkins 
J. W. Wise 
N. C. Jones 

The following preamble and resolutions were also offered: 

RESOLUTION. 

Whereas, under Federal regulations inter-state shipments of intoxica- 
ting liquors are delivered to the consignee before the State can have 
jurisdiction of the same, and 

Whereas, by this arrangement the State is seriously hampered in 
carrying out its policies relative to the traffic of intoxicating liquors, and 

Whereas, we believe the State should have full control under its police 
powers over all liquors within its borders, whether domestic or inter- 
state, therefore 

Be it Resolved: That we hereby declare ourselves in favor of such 
action by the Congress of the United States, as will guarantee to the 
States the fullest jurisdiction over all intoxicants consigned to them 
from the time they enter this State, to support such legislation as is con- 
templated by the Miller-Curtis Bill (H, R. 23641 and S. 7528) now pend- 
ing in Congress. 

The report and resolution were jointly adopted. 



i6 Minutes of the 



That the reader maj' better understand the purport of the 
resolution just adopted a copy of the bill referred to is here 
inserted: 

A BILL. 

To constitute intoxicating liquors as aspecial class of commodities and 
to regulate the interstate commerce shipments of such liquors. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United 
States of America, in Congress sssembled, That all fermented, distilled, 
or other intoxicating liquor shall constitute a special class of commodi- 
ties, and, as a special class, shall be admitted to and carried in interstate 
commerce, subject to the limitations and restrictions hereinafter imposed 
upon interstate commerce in articles of such special class. 

Sec. 2. That the interstate commerce character of all fermented, dis- 
tilled, or other intoxicating liquors, admitted to interstate commerce in 
accordance with the provisions of this Act, and transported from one 
State, Territory, or District of the United States, or from any foreign 
country into any State Territory, or District of the United States shall 
terminate upon their arrival immediately within the boundary of the 
State, Territory, or District of the United States, in which the place of 
destination is situated, and before the delivery of said liquors to the con- 
signee: Provided, that shipments of such liquors entirely through a 
State, Territory, or District of the United States, shall not be subject to 
the provisions of this section while in transit through such State, Terri- 
tory, or District of the United States. 

The auditing and finance committee through their chairman, 
R. Ledbetter presented two reports which follow, both of 
which were adopted without discussion: 
TREASURER. 

We the Committee of Audit and Finance have examined the books of 
our Treasurer, Mai H, Jones, and find that he has collected the following 
amounts for the objects named: 

State Missions 1^108.48 

Home Missions 119.96 

Foreign Missions 130.12 

Orphanage . . 126.08 

Sunday School and Association 6.94 

Aged Ministers .... 22.11 

Education 17.46 

Minute Fund 34.67 

Total $564.32 

Committee, 



R. Ledbetter 

A. W. G11.LIAM 
M. B. FI.ACK 



Grekn River Baptist Association. 17 

MINUTES. 

We find the churches sent up 134,67 for Minutes, We recommend 
that the Clerk be paid |io.oo for his services and that he expend the 
balance in the printing and distribution of the Minutes to the churches, 
and in furnishing them with blank Associational letters. 

Committee, 

R. LEDBETTER 
A. W. Gilliam 
M. B. Flack 
Note — The Minute fund being inadequate, a further collection was 
taken amounting to 1^17.20 making the total fund for this purpose $51,87. 

Adjourned to 9:30 tomorrow. 

MORNING SESSION. 

Saturday, Sept. 30, 1911. 

The Association re-assembled at 9:30. 

The devotional exercises were conducted by Elder J. R. 
Whiteside in the use of the 121st Psalms and prayer being 
offered by himself and Elder H. M. Croom. 

Minutes of yesterday's procedings read by the Clerk and ap- 
proved, the roll of delegates being called and absentees dropped 
from the list. 

A motion to drop Walnut Grove from our roll of churches, 
after remarks by the Moderator, Elders R. H. Herring, and 
H. M. Croom and brother A. W. Gilliam was lost. 

Elder R. H. Herring, chairman, ex-Board of Sunday Schools 
and Missions read the following which was briefly discussed 
by himself and others, and adopted. 

MISSION RESOLUTION. 

Realizing that our fifth Sunday meetings are a failure, largely speak- 
ing. 

Resolved: That we have no union meetings this year except a Sunday 
School Convention in May, or the fifth Sunday nearest May; and that all 
pastors and workers who will volunteer to do mission work on the fifth 



1 8 Minutes of thk 



Sundays in the weak churches and destitute places, report themselves to 
the Executive Committee, and work under the direction of said Commit- 
tee. 

All churches and individuals desiring the services of these brethren are 
requested to make application to the chairman of this Committee, 

R. H. Herring, Chairman. 

Brethren Z. V. Freeman, R. P. Geer and J. P. Arlege were 
appointed to inquire into, and report the results of their in- 
vestigations to the next annual session of the Green River 
Association, as to whether Mt. Lebanon church belongs to this 
organization or not. 

Elder Livingston Johnson, secretary of the State Mission 
Board, was recognized and welcomed by the Moderator. 

The subjoined report was presented by Elder H. C. Marley, 
of Old Fort: 

REPORT ON MINISTERIAL RELIEF. 

Many of our preachers once active in the Baptist ministry in North 
Carolina, who by reason of age or affliction are not now able to measure 
up to the active service demanded by our churches, quite a number of 
these are without adequate means of support. 

Sometimes too, the widow of a deceased minister, who has been a 
loyal helpmeet to her husband, sharing cheerfully in his toils and sacri- 
fices, is left in needy circumstances. 

The function of the Ministers Relief Board is to meet the needs of such 
ministers and their widows as best it can with the funds supplied by the 
denomination and its friends. 

There are at present about thirty-five beneficaries, and for the support 
of these, there has been collected during the present year only $2,700. 

We do, therefore, earnestly recommend that the pastors and delegates 
of this association see to it that a collection be taken once a year in each 
church for this worthy cause. 

Committee, 

H. C. MARI.EY 

J. C. Stott 
C. M. Jones 
R. LKDBETTER 

On motion to adopt Elders H. C. Marley and D. J. Hunt 
spoke favoring the adoption of the report. The discussion 
developed the fact that one of our worthy ministers, Elder B. B. 



Grken River Baptist Association. 19 

Harris was a beneficiary of this Board located at Durham and 
receiving therefrom $80.00 annually. A cash collection of 
|i4.oo'and church pledges amounting to $86.00 making a total 
of $100.00 for his benefit, thus relieving the State Board of 
this charge. The church pledges follow: 

Bethel $ 2 00 Bethlehem $ 2.00 

Bill's Creek 2.00 Chapel Hill 2.00 

Cherry Springs 2.00 Clear Creek 2.00 

Columbus 2.00 Cooper's Gap 2.00 

Dysartsville 2.00 Eureka i.oo 

Glenwood 2.00 Beulah i.oo 

Hall Town i.oo Harmony Grove .... 2.00 

Macedonia 2.00 Marion 10.00 

Mill Spring 3 00 Montford's Cove 4.00 

Mt. Creek 4.00 Mt. Vernon 5.00 

Mt. View 1 .00 Old Fort 5 00 

Pleasant Grove 2.00 Pleasant Hill 3.00 

Rock Spring 2.00 Round Hill 5.00 

Rutherfordton 10.00 Whiteside Valley i.oo 

Zion Hill i.oo 

The report was adopted. 

Elder F. M. Huggins submitted report on: 
STATE MISSIONS. 

"Go ye into all the world and preach the gospel to every creature." 
North Carolina is in the world. "The field is the world." North Caro- 
lina is a part of the field. "Ye shall witness unto me in Jerusalem." 
North Carolina is our Jerusalem. 

Ever since the organization of the Baptist State Convention in 1830, a 
systematic effort has been made to give the gospel to destitute sections in 
our own State. Throughout all these years, the blessings of the Master 
have increasingly attended our efforts, so that today we are supporting one 
hundred and forty-eight missioaries on the field and contributing about 
140,000 annually to State Missions. The comparative statistics of the 
work of the two preceeding years will indicate the character and growth 
of our State Mission work. Contributions for State Missions in 1909 
were $39,327.95, while for 1910, our contributions reached 141,428.46, 
which show an increase of 12,100.51. The apportionment for State 
Missions this year is 148,000, the greater part of which remains yet to be 
paid. 



20 Minutes of the 



The increasing material prosperity of our rural sections brings greater 
opportunities for doing State Mission work, and at the same time im- 
poses obligaiions that we can not afford to ignore. Out of fourteen 
Southern States, North Carolina stands sixth in the increase of agricul- 
tural products. The price of farm lands is rapidly on the increase. Bet- 
ter methods of farming, the rural mail service, and the telephone, are 
briuging to the country homes comforts that were never before enjoyed. 
In the meantime, North Carolina has felt the touch of an educarional 
stimulous, and as a result, the attendance upon the public schools has 
within the last decade increased ten per cent. We as Baptists will prove 
unfaithful to the trust reposed in us by the Master, unless we see to it 
that the religious progress of our State keeps pace with its material and 
educational progress. 

There are many reasons why we should espouse the cause of State 
Missions. There is the element of patriotism, which places every citizen 
under binding obligation to contribute something to the betterment of 
his State, but there is no stronger reason, than the fact that North Caro- 
lina needs Christ. Destitute sections of our State are calling to us for 
help. Shall we ignore their cry, and cast at them a stone, or a serpent, 
when they ask for bread or a fish ? The crttical hour for State Missions 
has been reached in many sections, and the supreme moment of oppor- 
tunity has come. Our cause must immeasurably suffer in future years, 
unless we rise up in the strength of our Lord to meet the demands made 
upon us. 

It is hoped that some plan may be placed on foot in our Association by 
which every individual church member may have the opportunity of 
making a contribution to State Missions. We should at least endeavor 
to bring every section into active co-operation with our State Mission 
work and to present the splendidly informing facts which we have. 

Committee, 

F. M. HUGGINS 
A. W. Gii:,i.iAM 

F. L. FI.YNN 

J. H. Morris 

Pending the adoption of the report. Elder F. M. Huggins, 
relinguishing the time allotted to him, introduced Elder 
Livingston Johnson, secretary of State Mission Board 
who discussed the report. At the close of his address a 
motion was made and carried that no church pledges be 
taken, but those given last year by the several churches 
be increased by at least twenty-five per cent. 



Grken River Baptist Association. 21 

Elder W. L. Haynes submitted the following which was 
adopted without any formal discussion: 

REPORT ON MINISTERIAL EDUCATION. 

God, in his wisdom, has always seen fit to call into the ministry many 
young men of very limited means. Our fathers long ago realized that 
these young men must be educated. Seeing this great need they estab- 
lished Wake Forest College and the Southern Theological Seminary, 
primarily for the training of these young men. God is still calling many 
young men who have not the means with which to adequately equip 
themselves for the public ministry. 

With our magnificent system of public and private schools, the rapidly 
increasing wealth and culture of our State and Nation, it is imperative 
that these God-called young men have the very best of training. — they 
are looking to the churches for funds while they are equipping them- 
selves for the greatest of all work. 

The Green River Association has sent out several young men who have 
received aid from the educational Board, and she has for her pastors to- 
day several men who have received aid from this Board. Three churches 
in our Association last year gave $25.00 to this cause. We all receive 
benefits from this Board — shall we not all give? 

We recommend that every church give something during the present 
year to Ministerial Education. 

Edward Long, 
For Committee. 

Dr. Wm. Louis Poteat, President of Wake Forest College, 
was recognized, welcomed, and introduced by Moderator D. J. 
Hunt. Dr. Poteat' s address on Education occupied about one 
hour's time. He spoke not "as man never spake, but as man 
seldom speaks." Like a meteor he flashed upon us; but ere 
the noon hour had passed, he was gone. 

A recess of one hour was announced by the Moderator for 
dinner. 

AFTERNOON SESSION. 

The Association re-convened at 1:30. 

Elder R. H. Herring presented 

REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS. 

Those who wish to do so, can understand and apply the teachings of 
the great commission. It is missionary from center to circumference. 



22 Minutes of the 



It includes all believers in its forces, and its field is the world. Begin- 
ning at our Jerusalem there is no stopping place until the stakes are so 
strengthened and the cords so lengthened that the tabernacle of Christ's 
Kingdom shall be stretched out to the uttermost parts of the earth. 

We are endeavoring to carry out the commission through our mission 
boards because we think this is the wisest and best plan 

The Foreign Mission Board is engaged in the holy task of world evan- 
gelization. It is appointed by Southern Baptists for this great work. 

The field is already white unto the harvest. China, with four times as 
many people as the United States, is passing through a most wonderful 
transformation. Now is the most opportune time to give the gospel to 
these millions. 

Japan is leading the countries of the orient — shall we not lead Japan 
to Christ ? Mohammedanism threatens to submerge Africa. Is it not 
ours to turn back the tide by the power of the sword of the spirit ? 

South America, Mexico and Italy are sick and disgusted with Roman- 
ism, they are ready to hear the true gospel message. Great and effectual 
doors are open unto us on every hand. 

We sent out thirty new missionaries last year. We have two hundred 
and seventy-three in all. They have the assistance of five hundred and 
thirty-one native helpers, and are teaching hundreds of others. The 
Missionaries reported three thousand six hundred and eighteen baptisms 
last year and will soon report tens of thousands of converts each year, 
unless all signs fail. There are seven Woman's Training Schools with 
one hundred and forty students and nine Theological Tratning Schools' 
with two hundred and twelve students. Fifteen Medical Missionaries 
are treating many thousands of patients and thus opening the way for 
the gospel to reach their hearts and the hearts and homes of millions of 
others. The printing houses are sending out the Bible and millions of 
pages of religious literature in the language of the people. 

The work is growing so rapidly that we must greatly increase our 
offerings to meet the imperative needs of the work so auspiciously begun. 

The total receipts for last year were $510,008.97, a small gain over the 
year before. An accumulated debt of $89,600 now rests upon the work. 
This, by all means should be paid off this year. To do so and maintain 
the work as it is now will require $600,000.00. Will we give it ? 

The Associalion gave last year, in round numbers, $400.00. We are 
asked to give $500.00 this year. Is that not a small enough task? 

We recommend: 

I. That all our people duly consider the claims of this work and help 
by sympathy and prayers and by the distribution and study of the For- 
eign Mission Journal and tracts of the Board, and by being loyal and 
obedient to the command of our Master. 



Green River Baptist Association. 23 



2. That we solmenly pledge ourselves to do all in our power to raise 
the amount of I500.00 which has been asked of our Association this year. 

R. H. Herring ] 
Z. T. Whiteside ! ^ 
J. C. Englands Kommittee. 

N. BUCKANAN J 

On motion to adopt Elders R. H. Herring, Livingston 
Johnson and D. J. Hunt made addresses after which the report 
was formally adopted. 

EXECUTIVE BOARD OF MISSIONS AND SUNDAY SCHOOLS 

The Moderator announced the following as composing the 
above Boards for ensuing year: 

Elder R. H. Herring, chairman; W. A. Harrell, R. P. 
Geer, J. D. Morris, B. B. Price, Elder Edward Long, J. M. 
Walker and J. L. Taylor — the last named being designated as 
secretary. 

TIME, PLACE AND INTRODUCTORY SERMON NEXT SESSION. 

The Committee on the these topics reported through their 
chairman, Z. V. Freeman, as follows: 

ist. We recommend that the next session be held with the church at 
Bills Creek, beginning on Thursday before first Sunday in October, 1912. 
2nd. That Elder R. H. Herring preach the introductory sermon, 
Elder A. P. Sorrell, Alternate. ^ 

Committee, 

Z V. Freeman 
R. P. Geer 
D. C. Nanney 

A motion to amend the report by substituting the name of 
Elder F. M. Huggins for that of Elder R. H. Herring was 
adopted. 

A motion to substitute third Sunday in October for first 
Sunday in October was lost. The report, as amended, was 
adopted. 

The following Nominations were submitted by Elder J. R. 
Whiteside: 



24 Minutes of the 



NOMINATIONS TO STATE AND SOUTHERN BAPTIST CON- 
VENTION. 

Southern Baptist Convention — Elder Edward Long; Alternate, Elder 
D. J. Hunt 

Baptist State Convention — Elder R. H. Herring; Alternate, Elder J, R. 
Whiteside. 

Committee, 

J. P. Jones 

C. C. Lovelace, Sr. 

J. C. McDanieI/ 

Report adopted. 

TRUSTEES ROUND HILL SCHOOL. 

Brethren A. W. Harrill and M. P. Flack, whose times ex- 
pire with this Associational year just closing, have been re- 
elected unanimously as their own successors by the Board of 
Missions and Sunday Schools. 

HISTORY. 

No additions have been made to our Associational History during the 
past year. The recommendation standing for a number of years has 
been general rather than explicit, and has ceased to bring results. Id 
order to expect definite results, it is suggested that Bethel and Coopers 
Gap Churches appoint a suitable brother in each church to write a history 
of his church, and forward same to the- undersigned not later than Sept. 
1st, 1912. 

A. L. RUCKER, 

Historian. 

Report adopted. 

MEMORIALS. 

The Moderator appointed Elder Edward lyOng, B. B. Price, 
and W. T. Morgan to write a suitable memorial of Sister 
Sarah Frances McCurry, deceased, and forward to the Clerk 
in time to publish same in this issue of our Minutes. 

Elder W. L. Haynes read report on 

STATE OF RELIGION. 

As can be best ascertained the State of Religion in our Association is 
above normal. During the past year we have not gone backward, but 



Grekn River Baptist Association. 25 

there has been a steady increase in our membership, activity, and spirit- 
ual fervor. We are beginning to realize more fully than ever before that 
the night is gone, and the day of larger things has dawned. The work 
is upon us. "The harvest truly is great but the laborers are few. Pray 
ye, therefore, the Lord of the harvest to send forth laborers into the 
harvest," 

Committee, 

W. L. Haynes 
H. M. Croom 
Sam Murphy 

Adopted without discussion. 

THANKS. 

Elder F. M. Huggins read the following which was cordially adopted: 
Resolved: That this body in consequence of the unbounded hospitali- 
ty so heartily extended the Association by the Mountain Creek Church, 
express heartfelt thanks to this church for her kind treatment and hospi- 
tality. 

F, M. Huggins. 

After announcements adjourned to 10 o'clock tomorrow. 
Benediction, Elder W. L,. Haynes. 

SUNDAY, OCTOBER ist, 1911. 

Owing to a slight rain in the early morning the services did 
not begin until half hour late, when Elder F. M. Huggins 
read St. John 1:14 and lead us in prayer. 

SUNDAY SCHOOL MASS MEETING. 

Under this topic the following speakers took a part: 
Elders H. C. Marley, W. L. Haynes, and F. M. Huggins; 
and brethren A. W. and, W. H. Gilliam. The musical 
program was conducted by Prof. W. B. Blanton, of Round 
Hill Academy. 

CI.OSING SERMON. 

After a short intermission, Elder Eivingston Johnson read 
Gen. 15:1-12 and short selections from St. Matt, and St. John, 
and leading the prayer. 



26 Minutes of the 



His theme, The two- fold, or the temporal and the spiritual 
life, had as its basis, Gen. 15:18 — "The language of God, the 
Father, himself;" and St. John, 3:36 — "The words of Christ, 
the Son, himself." In closing his wonderfully instructive and 
impressive sermon Elder Johnson lead us again in earnest 
prayer. 

FINAL EXERCISES. 

Elder Edward Long after a recapitulation of the work 
done at this session of the Green River Association, called 
the Moderator, D. J. Hunt, to the front who pronounced 
the final benediction in fervent prayer. 

The Association stands adjourned to meet with Bill's Creek 
church on Thursday before the first Sunday in October, 191 2. 

ELDER D. J. HUNT, 

Moderator. 
A. L. RUCKER, 

Clerk. 



Grkkn River Baptist Association. 27 



IN MEMORY OF HISS SARAH FRANCES McCURRY. 



Sister Sarah Frances McCurry was the youngest daughter of Elder 
Lewis McCurry, deceased, and was the last of his eight daughters to die. 

She was born in Cleveland County. Professed religion, joined the 
church at Mt. Zion, and was baptized by her father when only ten years 
of age. After she was grown she moved with her father to Dysartsville, 
McDowell County, where she resided until her death in the Spring of 
191 1, She was a faithful member of the Dysartsville Baptist Church for 
about fifty years. Being a devoted christian and possessing a kind dis- 
position, she carried hope and sunshine wherever she went. She desired 
to serve not only in life but in death as well. In her will she gave to the 
State Mission Board three hundred dollars ($300.) to be used in its dis- 
cretion. The State Board very fittingly gave the bequest to the erection 
of a church building in Stantonburg, a growing town on the Norfolk and 
Southern Railroad in Wilson County, The church has had placed in the 
wall a Memorial Tablet on which her name and a record of her gift is 
inscribed. A noble example by a noble woman. ' 

Committee, 

B. B. Price 
W. T. Morgan 
Edward Long 



28 Minutes of the 



From Dr. Landrum. 



Dr. M. M. lyandrum, of Crawford, Ga., who was for four- 
teen years Moderator of this Association, sent his regrets g.t 
not being able to attend the Association and prays the "Choice 
Benediction" of heaven on the brethren and for the "over- 
filling" of the Holy Spirit, and cites Phil. i:8-ii as express- 
ing his feelings. 

"For God is my record, how greatly I long after you in the 
bowels of Jesus Christ. And this I pray, that your love may 
abound more and more in knowledge and in all judgement; 
that ye may approve things that are excellent; that ye maj^ be 
sincere and without offence until the day of Christ; being filled 
with the fruits of righteousness, which are by Jesus Christ, 
unto the glory and praise of God." 

Reply was made by Elder R. H. Herring assuring Dr. Land- 
rum of the continued good wishes of the brethren and of their 
love, esteem and high appreciation. Ephesians 3:16-19 being 
cited as the sentiment of his brethren for him. 



Grken Rive^r Baptist Association. 



29 



WOMAN'S MISSIONARY SOCIETIES. 



The Woman's Missionary Society of the Green River As- 
sociation held their annual meeting in the grove during the 
session of the Association with the church at Mt. Creek. 

Mrs. A, L- Grayson, Vice-President, opened the meeting by 
reading the 39th Psalm. Mrs. Padgett, of Round Hill Acade- 
my, lead a beautiful and touching prayer. 

The Vice-President made a strong plea for quarterly reports, 
also a very helpful talk on all lines of our work, especially 
emphasizing our special week of prayer, prayer calendars, 
Mission study classes, and attendance. The societies as a 
whole promised to work for an increase of twenty-five percent. 
(25%) in our membership. Columbus sent no report, but 
Mrs. Jno. P. Arlege made a short talk in which she expressed 
the hope that the Society there will be able to report another 
year. 

Mrs. J. ly. Taylor, Secretary. 

Rutherfordton, N. C. 



CONDENSED REPORT WOMAN'S MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 



CHURCHES. 


PRESIDENTS. 


SECRETARIES. 


c 





tn 

C 

C.2 


be 









•3 








$ ...... 

15 80 
28 00 


$ .... 
8 35 
20 00 


$ 

6 05 
20 00 


*- 


$ ... 
1 00 


$ 

31 85 


Marion • 


Mrs Nanney 


Mrs. Wra. Fleming- 
Miss Hudg^ins- 


Sun Beams 


Miss Mag-grie Hudg-ins 


21 00 


89 00 








Mt. Vernon 

S. B. S. 


Mrs. D. G. Freeman • . 
Miss Maggie Freeman 

Miss Clara Morris 

Mrs. W. A. Warlick.... 
Mrs J L Taylor 


Miss M.J. Walker.. 
Miss Mary Freeman 
Miss Lovey Flack . . 
Miss Pauline Geer... 
Mrs. A. L .Grayson 
Mrs. P. Rollins 


4 35 

"10 05 
2 00 

32 68 


13 00 
4 85 
10 00 

2 00 
8 20 


6 00 


8 50 
3 43 
2 20 


;;;;;; 


31 85 
8 28 


Round Hill 

Mt. Creek. 


10 00 
4 00 
23 91 


32 25 
8 00 


Rutherfordton ■ 


64 79 


Ladies Aid 


Mrs. W. A. Harrill.... 








Totals 




$92 88 


$58 40 


$69 96 


$35 13 


1 00 


266 02 



CHURCH OFFICERS. 



CHURCHES 



Armstrong 

Bethel 

Bethlehem 

Beulah 

Big Level 

Bills Creek 

Camp Creek 

Cane Creek 

Chapel Hill 

Cherry Spring. 

Clear Creek 

Columbus 

Cooper's Gap... 

Dysartsville 

Eureka 

Glenwood 

Hall Town 

Harmony Grove 
Hickory Grove. 
Jesse's Grove .. 

Macedonia 

Marion 

Mill Spring 

Montfords Cove 

Mt. Creek 

Mt. Lebanon .... 
Mt. Pleasant 

Mt. Vernon 

Mt. View 

Old Fort 

Pepper's Creek.. 

Piney Knob 

Pleasant Grove 
Pleasant Hill ... 
Rock Spring .... 

Round Hill 

Round Knob*.. 
Rutherfordton .. 
Silver Creek*.... 

Stone Mt.* 

Sunny Vale 

Turkey Cove*.... 
Walnut Grove .. 
Whiteside Val'y 
Zion Hill 



PASTORS 



W. F.McMahan 
D. J. Hunt 
H. C. Marley 
T. W. Arlege 
J. B. Arlege 
J. R. Whiteside 
B. M. Hamrick 
G. W. Connor 
G. H. Weaver 
H. C. Marley 
P. J. Shell 
J. M. Walker 
J. B. Arlege 
P. J. Shell 
Z. T. Whiteside 
F. M. Huggins 
P. J. Shell 

A. P. Sorrels 
R. J. Tate 
No Report 

B. B. Harris 
Edward Long 
T. J. Moss 

F. M. Huggins 
D. J. Hunt 

No Report 

R. H. Herring 
T. W. Arlege 
H. C. Marley 
Reuben Pitman 
W. L. Haynes 
J. R Whiteside 
J. R. Whiteside 
J R. Whiteside 
R. H. Herring 

R. H. Herring 
J. B. Arlege 

G. W. Conner 
W.F. McMahan 
J. R. Boone 

W, L/Haynes 
D P Loudermilk 



POST OFFICES 



Sunny Vale 

Union Mills 

Old Fort 

Melvin Hill 

Saluda 

Uree R. i 

Forest City 

Bear Wallow 

Nebo 

Old Fort 

Shell 

Melvin Hill 

Saluda 

Shell 

Uree 

Union Mills 

Shell 

Nebo 

Fingerville S.C 

Cliffside 
Marion 
Forest City 
Union Mills 
Union Mills 



Rutherfordton 
Henrietta 
Old Fort 
Spruce Pine 
Ruth'ton R. 3 
Uree R. i 
Uree R. i 
Uree R. i 
Rutherfordton 

Rutherfordton 
Saluda 
Bear Wallow 
Sunny Vale 
Estatoe 

Ruth'ton R. 3 
Marion 



CLERKS 



M. F. Hollifield 
R. P. Morris 

A. W. Gilliam 
J. R. Splawn 
J. W. Smith 
W. C. Dalton 

B. Biggerstaff 
M. A. Searcy 

B. F. Corpening 
H. B. Croom 
W. D. Long 
L. H. Cloud 
J.'T. Jackson 
L. G. Price 
A. S. Whiteside 
L. A. Rayburn 
Jno C. Burnett 

F. O. Simmons 

A. L. Pitman 

Geo. F. Rhom 

B. B. Price 
J. J. Lambright 
E. S. Harris 

S. D. Lewis 

J. C. Ownby 
L. T. Rollins 
H. D, Jackson 
Logan Lackey 
H. F. Brown 
M. R. Camp 
R. Ledbetter 

G. C. Green 

H M. Whiteside 
W. F. Flack 
T. L. Bartlett 
T. C. Smith 
J. B. Justice 

C. M. Nanney 

J. P. Padgets 

M. P. Lowry 

G. Nanney 
GG Pendergrass 



POST OFFICE 



Woodtown 
Sugar Hill 
Old Fort R. 2 
Mill Spring 
Mill Spring 
Uree R. i 
Union Mills 
Mill Spring 
Marion R. i 
Old Fort 
Old Fort R. I 
Columbus 
Mill Spring 
Dysartsville 
Uree 

Nealsville 
Hawkins 
Nebo 
Landrum S. C. 

Vein Mt. 
Marion 
Tryon 

Union Mills 
Green Hill 

Dome 

ForestCity R i 
Walker 
Old Fort 
Mt. Mitchell 
Ruth'ton R. 3 
Uree R. 2 
Rutherfordton 
Mill Spring 
Union Mills 
Graphiteville 
Rutherfordton 
Mill Spring 
Black Mt. 
Sunny Vale 
Mt. Mitchell 

ChimneyRock 
Old Fort 



* Not reporting this year, but that of 1910 is given. 



STATISTICS. 







r3 
V 


&■ 


1 


ll 


5 




'a 

c 


1 




s 




CHURCHES 


^ o 


N 


7 s 





'5 ^ 


^ 




__ 


^^ 


X 


15 


or 




5 g 


'^ 


u tj 


a 


C 1-1 


y 






CO 


41 

"cS 




5 




3 £- 


cT 


V OJ 


a; 


'■^ »*-> 


X 


S 





i) 







c^c. 


23 


ai^lQi 




ffi 


C; 


H IH 


S 


u* 


H 


Armstrong ... 




25 2I| 








46 




25 


21 


46 


Bethel 


2 


2 


6 


I 


3 


I 


5 






65 


88 


153 


Bethlehem 


I 


5 


I 










6 




62 


79 


141 


Beulah 


I 


4 


5 




I 




I 


7 




28 


40 


68 


Bis^ Level 


4 


4 


2 


I 


4 




I 


2 




46 


54 


loo 


Bih's Creek 


I 




I 


2 


7 


3 






7 


65 


121 


186 


Camp Creek 




6 


3 










9 




43 


71 


114 


Cane Creek 


I 


21 


13 


7 


3 




3 


35 




59 


82 


141 


Chapel Hill 


4 


3 


4 




8 








I 


31 


H 


68 


Cherrv Spring.. 


3 








I 




I 




2 


21 


28 


49 


Clear Creek 


2 








12 


4 


2 




18 


46 


67 


"3 


Columbus 


2 




I 




13 


4 






16 


42 


36 


78 


Cooper's Gap.... 


3 


23 


4 


2 


12 


2 


I 


14 




48 


84 


132 


Dysartsville 


3 




3 




9 


4 






10 


57 


86 


143 


Eureka 


2 


















5 


8 


13 


Glenwood 




I 


4 










5 




13 


24 


37 


Hal! Town 


2 


8 


I 




2 




2 


5 




25 


25 


50 


Harmony Grove 


I 


2 


8 




5 






5 




67 


75 


142 


Hickory Grove.. 


2 


II 


6 




2 






15 




58 


69 


127 


Jesse's Grove .... 


























Macedonia .- 


I 


2 


I 


I 


3 


I 








64 


70 


134 


Marion 


1234 


3 


16 




II 


2 


I 


5 




53 


83 


136 


Mill Spring 


3 


2 


8 




6 


I 


5 




2 


74 


115 


189 


Montfords Cove 


4 


4 


I 


3 


9 




I 




2 


80 


155 


235 


Mt. Creek 


3 


9 


10 




4 




I 


14 




86 


162 


248 


Mt. Lebanon .. 


























Mt. Pleasant .... 


4 


I 


2 




3 




I 




I 


21 


34 


55 


Mt. Vernon 


2 


i6 


6 


4 


20 


2 


7 




3 


127 


200 


327 


Mt. View 


4 


I 


2 


I 


5 


I 


5 




3 


18 


23 


41 


Old Fort 


2-4 


19 


7 




5 






21 




35 


40 


75 


Pepper's Creek 




14 


5 




2 






17 




33 


45 


78 


Piney Knob 


2 


21 


4 




J 


3 




21 




34 


39 


73 


Pleasant Grove 


4 


lO 


2 


4 


10 




I 


5 




41 


83 


124 


Pleasant Hill... 


2 


50 


16 


2 


5 




I 


62 




152 


154 


306 


Rock Springs- 


3 


10 


4 


4 


I 




I 


16 




26 


34 


60 


Round Hill 


I 


15 


2 




II 


6 








139 


194 


333 


Round Knob*. ... 




















II 


9 


20 


Rutherfordton .. 


3-4 


5 


15 




7 




2 


II 




no 


135 


245 


Silver Creek .... 




















35 


39 


74 


Stone Mtn* 




















13 


30 


43 


Sunnv Vale 


I 


13 


6 


3 


2 


3 


2 


15 




20 


31 


51 


Turkey Cove*.... 




















23 


47 


70 


Walnut Grove .. 


























Whiteside Val'y 




19 


5 




9 






15 




22 


38 


60 


Zion Hill 


2 


^ 




' 


^ 




I 


7 




16 


40 


56 






337 


19536 


197 


37 


iL 


35S 65 


2039 


2S95 


4934 



*Estimate of 1910 — Not represented this year. 



SUNDAY SCHOOL STATISTICS. 









2 








c 

03 





03 




CHURCHES 


SUPT. 


POST OFFICE 




n 


22 

CO 



cfl 


en 
u 

Si 




1) c 


1 








Cfl 


J3 




P. 




a, 








H 




C/5 





pS 


i. 


> 


03 


Armstrong 








60 


60 










Bethel 


W. C. Raburn 


Vein Mt. 


9 


67 


73 


64 


6 


48 


2 


Bethlehem 


A. W. Gilliam 


Old Fort R. 2 


7 




7 


80 


12 




I 


Beulah 


James Smith 


Tryon 


I 


60 


67 






40 


2 


Big Level 




















Bill's Creek 


N. Williams 


Uree 


7 


25 


32 


4 


12 


20 




Camp Creek 




















Cane Creek 


Wm. Whiteside 


Uree R. i 


10 


142 


152 


304 


12 


96 


27 


Chapel Hill 


Jesse Corpening 


Marion 


10 


86 


96 


118 


12 


51 


3 


Cherry Spring- 


D. L. Roberson 


Old Fort 


7 


30 


37 


60 


12 


24 




Clear Creek 


W. D. Long 




6 


116 


124 


139 


12 


68 




Columbus 


J. P. Arlege 


Columbus 


7 


50 


57 


75 


12 


40 




Cooper's Gap.... 


J. W. Biddy 


Mill Spring 


9 


65 


74 




12 


50 


23 


Dysartsville 




















Eureka 




















Glenwood 


J. A. Bird 


Nealsville 


7 


64 


71 


200 


12 


45 




Hall Town 


John Bennett 


Hawkins 


4 


48 


52 


88 


12 


18 




Harmony Grove 


F. Simmons 


Nebo 


6 


60 


66 


76 


12 


44 


2 


Hickory Grove.. 


J. C. Stott 


Landrum S. C. 


6 


64 


70 


42 


9 


50 


7 


Jesse's Grove .... 




















Macedonia .... 


J. A. Gallion 


Demming 


5 


22 


27 


26 


4 


20 




Marion 


D. L. Carlton 


Marion 


8 


140 


148 


150 


12 


80 




Mill Spring 


J. H. Gibbs 


Mill Spring 
















Montfords Cove 


E. S. Harris 


Union Mills 


7 


63 


70 


324 


12 


45 


3 


Mt. Creek 


J, S. Hampton 


Green Hill 


8 


45 


53 


90 


8 


53 


4 


Mt. Lebanon .. 




















Mt. Pleasant .... 


W. E. Hudgins 


Red Top 


6 


35 


41 


100 


9 


35 




Mt. Vernon 


L. T. Rollins 


ForestCity R 3 


13 


105 


118 


187 


12 


86 


4 


Mt. View 


N. C. Burgess 


Mill Spring 


7 


26 


33 


20 


8 


25 


I 


Old Fort 


J. W. Walker 


Old Fort 


II 


115 


126 


193 


12 


65 


15 


Pepper's Creek 




















Piney Knob 


G. F. Roberson 


Ruth'ton R. 3 


5 


60 


65 


70 


12 


60 


16 


Pleasant Grove 


W. L. Bland 


Ruth'ton R. 3 


6 


40 


46 


40 








Pleasant Hill... 


D. D. Nanney 


Ruth'ton R. 2 


8 


95 


103 




9 


70 


28 


Rock Springs... 


O. B. Earley 


Mill Spring 


5 


36 


41 


36 


9 


25 


9 


Round Hill 


P. Stringfield 


Union Mills 


13 


190 


203 


300 


12 


97 


13 


Round Knob .... 




















Rutherfordton .. 


R.P. Scruggsjr. 


Rutherfordton 


10 


150 


160 


150 


12 


94 


5 


Silver Creek .... 


No Report 


















Stone Mtn 


No Report 


















Sunny Vale 


J. P. Padgett 


Sunny Vale 


3 


40 


43 










Turkey Cove .... 


No Report 


















Walnut Grove .. 




















Whiteside Val'y 


G. Nanney 


ChimneyRock 


7 


50 


57 


30 


12 


30 


13 


Zion Hill 


D. Simpson 


Ector 


7 


50 


57 


60 
3026 


12 


28 


6 








231 


2199 


2430 


14071184 



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puB saJSanoD 



saSBHBqdJO 



SUOISSIK 



o o o o o 
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CD lO-^ CO lO 



lOOOOOOOOO 

r-ooo oiraooo 

i-llO-*10CD(MCDM-* 



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riu^cDio-^ .^foro 



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TREASURER'S REPORT. 











< 


4; 


i^ 






H 




CHURCHES 


o 


C 

oj 


W) 


1- 


be 

C 


5 <u 

■^1 


.2 










rJ 




J2l 


ai ^ 


-a 


"S." 







3 



E.l! 
II 


03 




OiS 


ffiS 


&'§ 


cr:S 


u 




<2i 




g 





Bethel 


$ 


$ 7.65 


$ 970$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$1.00 


1 


$18.35 


Bethlehem 


7.00 


3-75 


3.68 




.00 


1. 00 


1. 00 


1.50 




27-93 


Beulah 


1.50 


1.50 








1. 00 




30 




4-30 




Big Level 




3.20 


3.20 




3.08 




1. 21 


1. 00 




11.69 


Bills Creek- .. 


3.00 
3-50 


3.00 
3.00 


3.75 
3.00 




5-00 
4.00 






2.40 

75 




17.15 
14-25 


Camp Creek.. .. 










Cane Creek 
















60 




60 


Chapel Hill 












1. 00 




1. 15 




2.15 


Cherry Springs 
















1.00 




1. 00 


Clear Creek 


10.00 


5.00 












1. 10 




16.10 


Columbus 


500 


2.00 


5 00 






2.25 




1. 10 




15.35 


Cooper's Gap ... 


2.00 


2.00 






3.00 






35 




7-35 


Dysartsville 
















1-55 




1-55 


Eureka 


3.00 


2.00 


2 00 




3.00 


1.00 


7.00 


55 




18.55 


Gleijwood 




2.05 
2.00 


3.00 
2.00 














5.05 
11.70 


Hall Town 


1.50 




3.00 


1. 00 


1. 00 


1.20 




Harmony Grove 
















2.25 




2.25 


Hickory Grove . 


2.00 


2.00 


2.00 




2.10 


1. 21 




l.IO 




10.41 


Macedonia 


2 00 


2 00 






2 00 


2 00 




30 
3- 00 
1.60 




8.30 

3.00 

10.84 


Mario n 


















Mill Springs 


2.31 


2.31 


2.31 


2.31 










Montfords Cove 


1.90 


1.85 


325 




3.10 






1.50 




11,60 


Mountain Creek 


8.00 


21.00 


30.00 




20.00 


2.00 


2.00 


3-35 


8.02 


94.37 


Mt. Pleasant.... 
















. 36 




36 


Mt. Vernon 
















1.50 




1.50 


Mt. View 


3.00 


1.50 


2.50 




3.00 






1. 00 




11.00 


Old Fort 














2.50 
55 




2.50 

.7.27 


Piney Knob 


72 


2.00 


2.00 




2.00 








Pleasant Grove.. 


4.00 


5.00 


5.25 




6.00 






30 




20.55 


Pleasant Hill... 


500 


5.00 


15.00 




5.00 


2.00 




2.00 




34.00 


Rock Springs.... 


4.00 


3.00 


4.00 




4.10 


2.00 




85 




17.95 


Round Hill 


30.00 


30.00 


19-50 


4.63 


40.00 


5.00 


.5-25 


2.55 


6.50 


143-43 


Rutherfordton.. 


4.15 


4.15 


4.15 










3.00 




15.45 


Sunny Vale 


2.25 


2.00 


2.50 




2.00 






70 




9.45 


White. Valley . 


2.65 


1. 00 


2.33 




5.70 


65 




86 




13.19 


Zion Hill 
















70 
50 




70 
50 


Armstrong 


















Pepper Creek.... 
















1.50 




1.50 


Totals 


108.48 


119.96 


130.12 


6.94 


126.08 


22.11 


17.46 


47.52 


14-52 


593.19 


Amount collecte 


dby A 


. L. Ru 


cker for mil 


mte fu 


Qd . . . . 


$ 7.35 $ 7.35 
^54.87 $600.54 



Respectfully submitted, this Sept. 30, 1911. 

M. H. Jones, Treasurer, Green River Association. 






GO- EDUCATIONAL 



Location; Round Hill is ten miles North of Ruther- 
fordton. 

Outlook: Boarding halls nearly full. Outlook is excellent. 

Ownership: It is owned and controlled by a board 
appointed by the Green River Association. 

Teachers The Teachers are thorough and enthusiastic. 

Methods: The school means to be an up-to-date insti- 
tution. 



. Tution $1.25 to $3.00 per month. 
Board from $6 to J7 per month. 



Spring Term Begins Jan. 2, 1912. 

Catalogue free, write 

D. J. HUNT, Principal, 

Union Mills, N. C. 



MINUTES 



OF THE 



SEVENTY-SECOND ANNUAL SESSION 



OF THR 



GREEN RIVER 

BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



HEI-n WITH 



BILLS CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rutherford County, N. C. 

October 3, 4, 5, 6, 1912 



Next Session Will Be Held With Mount Vernon Baptist Church, Five 
Miles North of Rutherfordton, Beginning on Thursday Before First 
Sunday in October, Nineteen Hundred and Thirteen. 



MINUTES 



OF THE 



SEVE\TY-SECOXD ANMAL SESSION 



OF THE 



GREEN RIVER 

BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

HELD WFIH 

BILLS CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH 

Ivutherford County. iV. C. 

October 3,4,5,6, 1912 



Next Session Will Be Held With Mount Vernon Baptist Church, Five 
Miles North of Rutherfordton, Beginning on Thursday Before First 
Sunday in October, Nineteen Hundred and Thirteen. 



1912 : 

CHARITY AND CHILDREN PRESS 
TiHOMASVIl.l.E N. C. 



OFFICERS 

Elder I). .1. Hunt, Moderator ITnioii Mills, N. C. 

Adin L. Rucker, Clerk Rutherfordton, X. C 

W. A. Harrell, Treasurer Rutherfordton, N. C. 

ORDAINED MINISTERS 

Arledge, J. B Saluda, N. C. 

Denton, .J.R Dysartsville, N. C. 

Harris, B. B Dysartsville, N. C. 

Haynes, W. L Gilkey, N. C. 

Herring, R. H Rutherfordton, N. C. 

Huggins, F. M Union Mills, N. C. 

Hunt, D. J Union Mills, N. C. 

Jackson, B. P Bright, N. C. 

Laughter, B. C Bob, N. C. 

Long, Edward Marion, N. C. 

J^udermilk, D. P Marion, N. C. 

McMahan, \V. F Sunny Vale, N. C. 

Mashburn, A. B .♦ .Nealsville, N. C. 

Sorrella, A. P Nebo, N. C. 

Taylor, L. G. L: R. 3, Rmtherfordton, N. C. 

Weaver, G. H Nebo, N. C. 

Whiteside, Z. T Uree, N. C. 

Whiteside, J. R .Spartanburg, S. C. 



PROCEEDINGS 



i^jLL.s Creek Baptist Church, 
Rutherford C^ounty, N. C., Thursday, Oct. 3, 1912. 

The spventy-seeoud annual session of the Greeti River Bap- 
tist Association convened with this church at 11 a. ni, today. 

Services began by singing, ' ' Take it to the Lord in prayer, 
folh.)\ved by invocation by Elder L. G. L. Taylor. The reading 
of second chapter of Ephesians by Elder A. P. Sorrells was 
followed ])y prayer. Elder B. B. Harris leading. 

Elder A. P. Sorrells preached the opening or introductory 
sermon from the word "Grace." as drawn frouj second 
Corinthians 12 :.S. 

Prayer, Eldei* R. 11. Herring leading, 

Upon call of Moderator, D. J. Hunt, foi- visiting brethren 
i'ei)i-esenting the different objects fostered by our State and 
Southern Baptist Convention, responses were made by Elder 
\V. R. Beach, repres(Miting the Biblical Recorder, and Elder 
Wade D. Bostic, missionary to China, now spending his vaca- 
tion among his old friends in this country. 

p]lder W. L. Haynes wTlcomed delegates and visitors to the 
ildiberations of the Association, and to the homes of the people 

After announcements, adjourned one hour for dinner, 

J benediction. Elder Wade D. Bostic. 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

The Association re-assembled in the house at 1 p. ni.. and 
prayer was olfei-ed by Elder B. B. Harris. 

Klder D. J. Hunt briefly responded to the address of 
wt^lcome delivered in the forenoon. 

Moderator D. J. Hunt called for additional church letters, 
when a number were handed in, twenty-one having been 
received by the clerk before the meeting of the Association. 
More than a quorum of the messengers being present, it was 
or) motion of Elder Edward Long that the rules were sus- 
pended, and Elder 1). -J. Hunt was re-elected Moderator by 
acclamation. Brother Hiuit thanked the body for its confi- 
dence and its contiinied evidence of respect. 



In the saiiiv inaiiiief. FJclcr W. L. Ilayiies making the mo- 
tion. A. L. Ruckler was re-elected Clerk, and AV. A. Harrell 
elected Treasurer of the Association. 

Elder R. H. Herring- and Brother W. T. Morgan were 
appointed a committee on Order of Business. Their reports 
need no repetition here since all subsequent proceedings are 
♦iiven in the order arranged by them. 

On call for new memliership, East Marion and Woodlawn 
churches presented letters asking admission. These letters 
were referred to Eldei-s Edward Ijong, B. B. Harris, and L. 
(1. Ij. Taylor, under whose favorable reports later both church- 
es were formally admitted and their messengers welcomed by 
tlie Moderator. . 

The pastor and deacons of Bills Creek church were named 
as the committee on Religious Exercises. Committees for 
the diffei'ent departments of work were also named, but since 
these arc app(Muled to the several i-eports they need no repe- 
tition hei*e. 

Tile "following was read by Elder W. R. Beach: 
REPORT ON BIBLICAL RECORDER 

For more than seventy-seven years the Biblical Recorded has 
answered every call of the Baptist denomination in North Caro- 
lina. It is estimated that there are seventy-five thousand Baptist 
homes in North Carolina, and only about thirteen thousand of these 
get the organ of our Fiaptist State Convention. As great as its 
influence is at present, it can never do its best work for the 
Kingdom until it can carry its blessings to a greater number of 
people. We would urge the pastors and its present readers to make 
an effort to double our present subscription list during the pres- 
ent year, ft is the safeguard of our principles which have been 
purchased at the price of the blood of our forefathers, and held 
sacred by every loyal Bai^tist. 

The Recorded makes appeal for every claim of Christianity. It 
teaches the great doctrine of Christianity in a masterful way. 

Let us urge its merits of patronage before the people, because we 
are morally obliged to do this. Let us make haste to do it. 

Ww R. Beach, 
For Committee. 

The repoi't was discussed by Elder AV. R. Beach and after- 
wai'd adopted. 



The followiMg' rc^port by J. M. Arnette, taken from Bil)li- 
cal Recorder of .July 81st, last, was read by Elder W. Iv. 
Ilayiies, spoken to by himself. Elders W. D. Bostic, R. 11. 
Herring'. B. B. Plarris and Brother A. W. Gilliam on motion to 
adopt. 

MINISTERS RELIEF 
The object of this Board is to afford aid and relief to needy 
Baptist ministers of North Carolina and their widows. There are 
four regular meetings of the Board each year, on the fourth Wed- 
nesday in February, May, August and November. 

There are at present thirty-five beneficiaries. There are sev- 
eral applications before the Board, showing that the gradual in- 
crease of the number of beneficiaries will continue. These bene- 
ficiaries receive from forty to two hundred dollars a year. Many 
of them need more. Some of them have no means of support ex- 
cept the amount they receive from the Board. It should be the 
desire and effort of every Baptist of the State that not one of those 
who have been worthy proclaimers of God's truth should suffer for 
the actual necessities of life. All money for this Board should be 
sent to the Treasurer of the Convention. 

There is increasing liberality on the part of our churches to- 
ward the work of this Board. But still nearly three-fifths of the 
churchts of the State give absolutely nothing for this object. 
More than one-fourth of the Associations of the State contribute 
nothing to this work, while a number of those contributing give al- 
most nothing. Four of the Associations not contributing to the work 
have beneficiaries on the Board. Will not some earnest pastor or 
layman at each Association, as it shall soon convene, champion 
the cause of the aged minister and his family and see to it that his 
Association not only gives something but gives as liberally as 
the object deserves? 

W. L. Haynes, 
Charles Morris, 
.T. H. Raburn, 
J. J. Lambright, 

Committee. 

After securing pledges for this object, amounting to $88.00. 
the report was adopted. See table of pledges and appoint- 
ments. 

After sundry motions and amendments, affecting the 
fifth Sunday meetings, and brieP discussions, participated in 
hy Elders Edward Long, R. H. Herring, A. P. Sorrells and 1). 



•I. Hunt, and l)i'etlir(Mi J. M. Gibson, Jolui Sane and A. W. 
(lilliam, resulting- in the repeal of the resolution appearing on 
l)ages 17 and 18, Minutes of 1911, it was 

Ordered, That the fifth Sunday meetings be revived and that 
the first of the series be held with Woodlawn church, begituiing 
ori Friday before 5th Sunday in December, next. 

In the proceeding's of Saturday afternoon the above or- 
• h'T was so amended as to read Round Hill instead of Woodlawn 
church, and March, ]f)18 instead of December next. See pro- 
ceedings of Saturday p. m. 

On motion, adjourned till 9:30 tomorrow morning. 

Benediction. P^ldei- Edward Long. 

MORNING SESSION 

Friday, October 4, 1912. 
I'he Association re-assembled in the house at 9:30 a. m. 
KbhM' B. B. Harris read Romans 8, anct led us in prayer, when 
the Association was called to order by the Moderator. 

Minutes of yesterday were read by the Clerk, and appro^'ed. 
No response to call for visitors. 

No call of the roll of messengers sent by the churches was 
oi'(h^red, and the following list embraces those momtioned in 
the several Associational church letters. 

Armstroivg: — Walter Elliott, Charles Byrd, Grover Bja-d. 

Bethel:— W. S. Raburn, M. C. Morgan, A. L. Bright, J. F. 
Morgan. 

Bethlehem:— J. M. Gibson, A. VV. Gilliam, S. A. Parker. 

Beulah : — Not represented. 

Big Level: — W. ,T. Wilson, Willie Gilbert, John Skipper. 

Bills Greek :— P. F. Searcy, L. W. McDaniel, J. C. McDanieL 
At. W. Williams. 

Camp Creek:— .J. C. Guffy, Burgin Guffy, J. P. Norville. 

Cane Creek:— H. E. Haynes, C. W. Searcy, B. F. Jones, S. A. 
Fortune. 

Chapel Hjlj,:— G. H. Weaver, C. B. Morris, B. G. Hensley, 
h^sse Corpening, John Kaylor. 
Cherry Spr].\g: — W. H. Gilliam, Clarence Gilliam, N. S. Davis. 

Clear Creen:— G. B. Woody, N. Sparks, L. B. Willis, W. D. Long. 

Columbus:— N. T. Mills, John L. Smith, John S. Gilbert, Roone 
.\ Pledge. 



Cooi'EH'ts Gaf:— J. W. Biddy, T. X. Wilson. 

Dysoktsvili.e: — W. N. Laughridge, W. H. Taylor, B. T. Daves, 
L. G. Price. 

East Marioxn: — Elder D. P. Loudermilk, T. C. Dixon. 

Eureka:— John Hill, A. S. Wtiiteside, Rev. Z. T. Whiteside. 

Greenwood: — T. W. Bracket, J. H. Raburn. 

Hall Town: — .J. B. Lewis, William Morgan. 

Harmony Grove:— Elder A. P. Sorrells, Clyde C. Sorrells, E. S. 
Brown, Wm. Lawing, D. C. Brown, F. L. Simmons. 

Hickory Grove: — J. G. Rabnrn, .J. C. Scott, P. G. Green, A. L. 
Pitman. 

Jesse's Grove: — Not represented. 

Macedonia: — Elder B. B. Hari'is, Geo. F. Rhom, W. H. Rumfelt. 
.1. J. Davis. 

Marion: — Rev. Edward Long, W. T. Morgan, .J. R. Ledbetter. 
Mill Spring:— J. J. Lambi'ight, J H. Gibbs, J. R. Foster, 
Jessie Splawn. 

Montford's Cove: — L. D. Hemi)hill, M. R. Nanney, S. R. Hall. 
J. W. Halford, G. M. Harris. 

Mountain Creek: — G. B. Flynn, J. H. Keeten, A. L. Ruckcr, 
N. L. Hampton, H. M. Rucker, G. M. Flack. 

Mount Pleasant: — J. C. Ownby, W. E. Hudgin. 

Mount Vernon: — W. P. Crowder, W. B. Wilson, G. E. Morgan, 
.f. B. Freeman, L. T. Rollins. 

Mountain View: — ^C. C. Jackson, D. J. Halford. 

Old Fort: — Sam Murphy, R. H. Hughs, J. Y. Gilliam. 

PiNEY Knob: — P. L. Hensley, Joim Achley, John Haynes. 

Pleasant Grove: — W. L. Bland, R. Ledber, J. C. Ledbetter. 

Pleasant Hill: — D. C. Nanney, Pink White, C. C. Lovelace, .lolm 
Sane, Christopher Sane, J. D. Whiteside. 

Rock Spring:— .L A. Frady, C. V. Elliott. 

Round Knob: — 'W. M. Pitman, James Bradley, J. N. Barelett. 

Round Hill: — J. D. Morris, A. P. Nanney, H. Nanney, P. C 
Shitle, C. H. Krause. 

Rutiierfordton : — Elder R. H. Herring, John G. Nichols, H. T. 
(Jreen, Dr. J. L. Greer, J. L. Taylor, W. A. Harrell. 

Sunny Vale: — Represented by letter. 

Silver Creek: — W. J. Green, Horace Arledge, Wadell Hill, H, 
P.Arledge. 

Stone Mountain: — Wm. Gilbert, C. J. Smith. 

Turkey Cove: — Not represented. ,,). 

Walnut Grove: — Not represented. 

Whiteside Valley: — ^P. P. Parker, Z. V. Taylor. 

Woodlawn: — R. Byrd, Robert Baxter. 

ZiON Hill:— M. J. Hall, J. H. Marsh. 



8 

One cliurch, IMt. Lebanon, has been dropped from the roll; 
and two new chnrches, East Marion and Woodlawn, have 
l)een added. Of the forty-six churches now composing the 
l)ody, forty-one were represented by either letters or messen- 
iicn's, or both — the remaining five not being represented in any 
way. 

Elder Edward Long read the following: 

Foreign Missions is at the very heart of the Christian message 
and to get a just and comprehensive view of foreign mission oppor- 
tunities at present is the greatest inspiration in the Kingdom of God 
on the earth. 

The complete transformation of China within the last few months 
is one of the greatest events in human history. A radical change 
of one-fourth of the human race intellectually and politically, and 
the making of them ready for spiritual readjustment, in so short a 
time, is without parallel in the history of nations. 

The Foreign Mission Board, located at Richmond, Va., is a com- 
mittee appointed by the Southern Baptist Convention to carry on 
this, our foreign mission work, by the co-operation of all our church- 
es and in behalf of all our people. 

It is our work. One member of the Board lives in each state 
and is called the State Vice-President. A representative of the 
Board lives in every association. Ho is expected to confer with the 
Board and with the churches in the interest of the work. This 
body at this session is expected to either elect or appoint this asso- 
ciational representative. 

Our pre&ent fields are Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, Italy, Africa, 
Japan and China. 

The present number of missionaries is 271; native workers, 577, 
making a total of 848. The 342 native churches are growing in 
self-support and missionary efforts. The 422 Sunday schools are 
doing aggressive work. Nine Women's Training Schools have 312 
students, and ten theological schools have 245 students. These, 
with the other 208 schools of all grades, have 6,156 pupils. In six 
hospitals and thirteen dispensaries, thirteen medical missionaries 
treated 51,796 patients during the year. Four publishing plants 
are sending out millions of pages of religious literature. 

The contributions for 1911-'! 2 were $580,408, a gain of $70,400 
over the previous year. For the collecting, distributing, paying of 
secretaries, ])aying of interest, printing literature, etc., 12 per cent. 
is spent— a very small amount when compared with the expendi- 
tures of other concerns that do business in foreign countries. 



9 

The Southern Bai)tist Convention asked the churches to raise 
$618,000 for foreign missions this 3'ear. Every dollar of it is needed 
To meet past obligations and maintain the work on a hopeful basis. 
The Convention apportioned this amount among the various states, 
and the amount asked of each state is apportioned among the asso- 
ciations. T::is association is asked to raise $575.00 of the $50,000.00 
apportioned to Xortii Carolina. We raised last year, under the old 
pledge system, only $308, or about six and one-fourth cents per mem- 
ber. To raise the entire amount asked we would only have to give 
10 cents per member per year, or less than one cent per member per 
month. Surely if we bear the name of Missionary Baptists we can 
not think of doing less than this for this greatest of all causes. To 
this end therefore, we, your committee, recommend that a commit- 
tee of five from the various sections of the association be appointed 
by the Moderator to a])portion this amount pi oj^^ortionately among 
the cliurclies of the association that each one may assume its part 
of this amount. 

One hundred years ago Adonirum .Tudson and l^uther Rice went 
out to India as Congregational Missionaries. By the study of the 
Bible they became Baptists. This fact aroused the Baptists of Amer- 
ica to undertake foreign mission woik in an organized way. 

The most significant advance ever ordered by the Southern Bap- 
tist Convention toolc place when the Ol-.lahonia meeting last Mav 
authorized the Foreign Mission Board to raise one million, two 
hundred and fifty thousand dollars as an equipment fund in honor 
of the Judson Centennial — one million of this to be used for equip- 
jiing our schools and publication woik. Two hundred and fift.y 
Thousand dollars is to-be used for building chapels, hospitals, and 
missionary homes. This is a mighty call, but it is to a mighty peo- 
])le. This fund is to be raised during the next three years. It is to 
))e entirely separate from the regular foreign mission offerings and 
the effort will be made to secure it in such a wa\- as not to inter- 
fere with any other cause. 

For tracts, literature and missionary information of any kind, 
wiite tlie I'^Oi'pign Mission Board, Richmond, Va. 
Res])ectfully sul'mittcd, 

Edward Long, 

J. C. GUFFEY. 
W. C. R A BURN, 

S. Brice Gha.nt. 
. the report was discussed by Elders; 
. l>ostie and R. H. Herring, tlie latter 
rej)i'('S(Mitalive oF llie P\>reign Mission 



On mot 


ion 


to ado 


!>t 


l*'d\vard L( 


'n^i'. 


Wade 


1) 


heiiio' the ; 


^ISSDi 


I'iatioiu 


il 


J>()ar(L 









to 

A I'f'soliition wns jidoptcd ;is nil niiiciHliiunit to the report, 
nslving the Moderator to a])[)()iiit a eonniiittee of five to ap- 
|)()j'tioti the amounts that the sfn'(-ral churehes will be expected 
to raise for this ol)j(Md. I-^ater this eoniinittee — Elders Ed- 
ward Loii<j;'. R. H. Ilci'j-ing- and A. P. Sorrells, and brethren R. 
I.cdhettei- and X. T. Mills — iviad(^ their report reeommendijiii' 
ihal the ammnits Ix- [>laeed in a ta1)ie of pledges and apportion- 
ments. VNhieh will I)e found at the close of thes(> proceedini^'s. 
Tile appointms^nt amounts to J-pOoD.OO. 

The reporl as amended was now adopted. 
Kldf'r li. 11. Herring submitted tlie following report: 
RELIGIOUS EDUCATION AND ROUND HILL SCHOOL 

It is no longer necessaiy to argue with men to convince them 
of the imiJortan(;e and necessity of education. The great question 
now is as to what sort of education. 

The stale is doing a great work in its educational systems, and 
we hail with delight tlie advance steps being taken, and shall expect 
tliis work to move steadily foi ward until there is an adequate sc'iool 
teim, and pr0i)er equipment within reach of every child in our state. 

Wake l^'orest has done a work for hundreds of sons of North 
Carolina that cannot be measured, and for which we, as a denomina- 
tion, are under measurable obligations to its founders and benefac- 
(01 s. It has been, and is now, the main spring of our Baptist cause. 
To her and her noble younger sister, Meredith, with her remarkable 
history and woi k, we pledge our loyal support; and to all other in- 
stitutions of true learning we give the glad hand and God speed. 

However helpful indispensable our public schools, they fal. 
and nuist continue to fail, for obvious reasons, to give us the sort 
of training we need and must have in order to preserve our best 
i)ossessicn3, and to press forward to the goal of highest achievements 
as Christian citizens. 

Our own colleges and seminaries cannot supply the need, for so 
few, comparatively, ever enjoy their benefits, and then they are large- 
ly dependent upon our d^-nominational high schools for their very 
existence. So it is the high scliool to which we of necessity turn 
for help; and it is to our ov/n Round Hill School we would turn 
the minds, heai-ts and energies of this association. It is ours, 
(rod, directing his servants and his churches, has given it to us. 
We have ac>cepted it as our very own. It has proven itself en- 
tii-ely vvorthy of our fostering care. We have put very little into it, 
and have gotten rich returns. No one can estimate its value, and 
lis work gors or. in an ever increasing and progressive ratio. Shall 



11 

we retard it, stop it, or liel[) it go ou its glorious Gocl-giveu cai'eer? 
Which? 

A crisis is upon it; it has done and is doing its work with a 
mighty struggle. It is struggling witli deht and poor equipment, and 
the work cannot be long sustained unless the debt is paid and 
necessary equipment supplied. The boarding capacity is sixty, and 
we now have eighty boarding pupils. The men of this association 
shall answer the question. What shall the answer be? 

This is a goodly land. Shall \ve not possess it, and enjoy its 
fiuits? V/e are alumdantly able. Shall we not unloose the fet- 
ters of Round Hill and give it a chance to send light, beauty, peace 
and strength into our homes, church es. and our Master's kingdom 
on earth and add resi)lendent glory to His heavenly throne? 

R. H. Hekkinu. 
J. C. Ledbettkh, 
M. W. Williams, 
C. V. Elliott. 

Committee. 

it ^^•rls mIso ordered that the report of the Treasure]* of 
Iiouiul Hi]] School be ineoj'|)orated wlicii received. 

On motion to adopt, the discussion was opened by Elder 
Iv. IT. Herring', followed by Brother R. B. Lineberry, financial 
agent of our denominational schools and colleges. Superinten- 
dent B. II. Bridges and br(4lire]) Jolm Sane and W. A. Harrell 
also spoke Oil the report. 

A proposition was submitted to the churches through their 
<h^legates as to whether they would stand behind the movement 
to raise the indebtedness of the Round Hill School, which 
amounts to about $2,124. The messengers present and ans- 
u^'ring were all in the affirmative — none in the negative. 

Tlie report as ameiided was adopied. 

Brother F. B. Ilamrlck. of the Baptist Orj)hanage. was 
recognized and welcomed. 

Adjourned to 2 :80 p. m. 

Benediction. p]ider G. G. O'Neill. 

AFTERNOON SESSION 
The Association met pursuant to adjournmep.t and was 
^■•alled to order by the ^Moderator. 

Praver was offeree! bv Eldei- L. 0. J.. Taylor. 



12 

Th.c Cherry Spi'iti^i- iissoeiatioiuil letter was received. 
!^]l(lei' II. ('. Marh^y r-ead as f()llo^^■s: 

THE THOMASVlLLti] ORPHANAGE 

Twenty-seven years lie behind the Baptist Oi-i)hanage at Thoni- 
asville; more than thirteen hundred children have been sheltered 
within its walls. There are tour hundrecl now en.ioying its blessings. 

Our peoide should teel a grateful pride and joy in the work of 
our Orphanage. It has long since out stepped any other institution 
of its kind in the State, and in the number of children under its 
rare, it stands second in the Southern States. 

In many things the Ba))tists of North Carolina have been won- 
derfully blessed; ])ut upon no other department of our work has the 
favor of the Lord rested more signally than upon the Orphanage. 

The magnificent gift made to the Orphanage 1)y Mrs. Kennedy 
adds much to the institution; but that does not in any wise lessen 
our obligations, as there are daily api)lications made for shelter for 
the heli)less ones. 

We, therefore, earnestly recommend that every church in this 
association, both gr^-at and small, arrange to assemble on Thanks- 
giving Day, or the Sunday nearest Thanksgiving Day, and, with 
praises on their lips and with joy in their hearts, for the blessing 
of the year, show their api)reciation by sending the Orphanage the 
largest contribution in the history of the church. 

We also urge that the Sunday schools continue to take monthly 
collections throughout the >ear, and that every Sunday school take 
"Chaiity and Children," the Orphanage jjaper, and keep the young 
people informed as to the needs of the Orphanage. In clubs of ten, 
or more, it costs on]>' sixty cents ])er copy. 

H. C. Maeley, 
J. M. Gibson, 
.John Sane, 
D. C. Nanney. 

Committee. 

TFie report was discussecf by Elder H. ('. .Marley and lirotli- 
cr K. 1). II am rick, and ad()])ted. 

Tlie t'oilowing' Avas n^ad and s.i)()ken to by Elder G. G- 
() Weill, and ad(»[>ted: 

TEMPERANCE REPORT 

We reiterate our i)Osition on the Temperance question, and pledge 
oui selves to use our influence to discorirage drinking ai^dent spii'- 



18 

its, and to assist the officers of the law in the enforcement of the pro- 
hibition law. 

G. G. O'Neill, 
W. L. Bland, 
G. B. Flynn, 
T. N. Mills, 

Committee. 

KUlci- A. 1*. Soi-rells rend rei)()i-t on 

Let us take a three-i)ointed view of the i)rogress North Carolina 
is making- 

STATE MISSIONS 

MATKKIAL (IAIN 

In 1900 the value of our manufacturing goods was $85,274,08:]. 
In 1904 — M^hich are the latest figures at hand — the manufacturing 
products reached $142,520,776. At the same rate of progress to 
1910 they , would have reached $197,764,469, an increase of 235 
])er cent. 

BA.xKs A.xn iM-;p<)srrs 

In 1900 we had thirty-one national banks, which had $15,362,- 
182.15. In 1910 there were seveni j^-ftve national banks with re- 
sources amounting to $55,155,374.00, an increase of 141 per cent, in 
the number of banks, and nearly 260 per cent in resources. In 1900 
our deposits in banks were $7,477,057.97. in 1910 they were $26,- 
268,062.00, an increase of 251 per cent. 

EDUCATIONAL 

In 1900 there was 60 per cent, of our children of school age In 
the public schools; in 1910 there were 70 per cent of them in school, 
a gain of 10 per cent. Also note that the school term has been 
lengthened. In 1910 we expended for public school education $950,- 
317.00; in 1910 the sum reached $2,796,079.00. 

The number attending state and denominational colleges was 
more than doubled, and the equipment and endowment of these 
schools were greatly enlarged. 

RELIGIOrS DKVKI OPMENT 

During the last decade the Roman Catholics in North Carolina 
made a greater percentage of gain than the Protestants. North 
Carolina is the only state in the South whose percentage of in- 
crease in church membership did not keep pace wnth the growth 
of population. Only 38 per cent, of our population are Christians. 
Ten years ago more than 42 per ceni. of our people w^ere Christians. 
While there has been a gain of 114,800 church members, there has 
been a loss of over 4 per cent, of the total population. While the 
l)opulation has been growing more rapidly than the church member- 
ship, the Ba])tists have grown nearly 4 per cent, more rapidly than 



1^ 

the population. From 1890 to 1906 the Baptists gained 29 per cent., 
while all otheis gained only 13 per cent. 

Notice our aggressive State Mission policy. Can we save our 
state from the dangers of commercialism? During the first five 
years of the past decade, when money was scarce, we increased our 
contributions to State Missions 100 per cent., while in the last five 
years, v^^hen money was plentiful, we only advanced 50 per cent. 
This wave of prosperity is threatening- to our relig;ious life. Let 
us take warning and beware. 

Signed, A. P. Sorkells, 

For committee. 

On motion to adopt, Elders A. P. Sorrells. R. IL Herring-. 
1). J. Hunt Mnd Brother R. B. Lineberrv spoke. 

The report was adopted. 

On motion, adjourned to 9:30 tomorrow. 

Benediction. Elder II. C. Marley. 

]\IORNING SESSION 

Saturday, October 5, 1912. 

The Association met pursuant to adjournment at 9:30 a. nr. 

Devotional exercises were conducted by Elder D. P. Lou- 
di'rmilk. using the 55th Psalm and leading the prayer. 

Reports were handed in from a number of the Woriian 's 
.\(issioniiry Societies, whose annual meeting was announced to 
meet in this church at .12:45 p. m. 

Folder B. 1). Harris presented rej)ort on 

MINIS TERIAL EDUCATION 
"There is no question that the money spent through this channel 
has brought as large and as rich returns to the denomination and 
10 the Kingdom as any money that we have spent in any place. We 
trust that every church will take up this matter during the next 
.\ ear, and give as liberal offering to it as possible. There is a 
great opportunity here for the Sunday schools also. In the Sunday 
schools are the preachers of the future. If the superintendents 
and teachers would take this matter up, lay before their schools 
aiul classes the claims and opportunities of the ministry, and take 
a good collection for the Board of Education, we should no doubt 
see many of our boys turning their attention to this great work, 
and great good would come to the cause. This work of finding men 
nnd training them for the woi'k of the Kingdom comes nearer repre- 
senting the work of .Jesus during His earthly ministry than anything 
rhat vv'e are doing. Can our churches afford to be indifferent towards. 



15 

it? Lei lis niake the coming year the hest in the liistory of the 

Hoard." 

B. B. Harris, 
J, B. Lewis, 

G. E. MOEGAX, 

Committee. 

On iiiotio!! to adopt, the speakers were Elders B. B. Ilai'- 
I'ls. Edward Long. R. TI. Herring and D. J. Hunt. 

A resolution asking- that each church and Sunday school 
take at least one collection f^;r this object within the associ- 
ational year was j)ropos(^d. Botli the report aiKl the resolution 
were adopted. 

The subjoined report was read by Brother W. T. Morgan. 

WOMAN'S WORK 
In the twenty-sixth year of the organization of v/oman's work our 
.state can realize something of their striving for "'larger things." It 
is the dominant power of women that is making our present civi- 
lization bow at her shrine. Their organizations are filled and thrilled 
with extensive and intensive views of the cause of missions. The 
statistics are in accord with this in every state. While there are 
laggard members even- in their ranks, yet they are doing more ac- 
<ording to their financial power than the average man and we now 
calculate on their giving a great amount to this cause. 

It is to the work of the women, more than anything else, that 
we must look for an active and earnest interest in world-wide mis- 
sions in our country churches, in our own Association we sorely 
need this awakened interest for many of us are not doing a work 
worthy of Missionary Baptists, and where the best results are re- 
]>orted there is an organization of the women. 

The work now being done in training the Sunbeams and Royal 
Ambassadors will be realized in the near future with many hundred- 
fold increase in the interest and contribution to the cause of a world- 
wide evangelization. 

As the heart is the driving engine of the body so in every live 
active chui'ch Ihei'e is the same figurative power — Woman's Work. 

W. F. Flack, 
J. H. Kkause, 
P. C. Shitle. 

Committee. 
After remarks by Elders H. H. Herring and D. J. Hunt and 
brethren W. T, Morgan and J. F. Logan, the report was 
adopted. 



1() 

Brothel' Aroi-o-an also presented the folk)\ving': 

HOME MISSION REPORT 

Ten years ago the receipts of our Home Board were $88,874. 
This year they were $366,050. The apportionment ordered by the 
Southern Baptist Convention for the present fiscal year, ending May 
1st, 1913, is $412,000. 

Ten years ago the Board employed 674 missionary workers; the 
past year it employed 1,309. Ten years ago 8,150 Baptists were re- 
ported; last year 26,899 Baptists were reported. . 

Within ten years contributions in cash to this cause have dou- 
bled more than four times, and dui-ing the past year more than 
18,000 more persons have been baptized than during the year 1902. 

What have we done? 

The minutes of the Green River Association show that the 
total contribution of all the churches constituting this body in the 
year 1907 was about $300; in 1908 it was $321.95; in 1909 it was 
$324.46; in 1910 it was $352.65; and in 1911 it was $313.42. Not 
only have we failed to inciease our contributions with other aver- 
age sections of the territory of the Southern Baptist Convention, 
1)ut last year we fell back in our total contributions $39.23. 

We recommend that large use be made of the varied and very 
helpful tracts published by the Board, which are mailed free for the 
asking, by addressing the Baptist Home ^lission Board, Atlanta. 
Ga. 

We further recommend that all of our pastors be requested to 
preach to their ])eople at least on:e duiing each year upon this 
great cause. 

Surely our people do not realize that less than one-third of 
the ])eople of the South are mcnibers of any evangelical church. Sure- 
ly they do not yet understand that our God, to whom especially 
Missionary Baptists have long been praying to open the doors of 
the nations of the earth to our missionaries, is sending into our 
midst in this blessed Southland 60,000 foreigners each year, who 
know nothing of our God, and nothing of our American institu- 
tions, in order that we may give them the gospel. With these in 
helpless darkness at our very doors, and the large majority of our 
own people unsaved, and the millions in Cuba and Panama in 
pitiable destitution, if our people were only awake, can't it be 
possible, that any would answer the call, "Am I my brother's 
kt e])er?" 

Can it be possible that all our pastors even have realized that 
while there are five of our churches that make no contributions to 
missions — and possibly ought to be aided by us — that there are 
rwenty-one churches with a total membership of 1,929 who pay to 



17 

the cause of Home - Missions a total sum of $47.01, or an average 
of only two and one-half cents per member? 

Our people love God and humanity too much for this to be the 
case, if only they ai-e made ro realize the situation. 

W. T. Morgan, 
J. H. Flack, 
T. W. Brackett, 

Committee. 

On motion to adopt, the speakers responding were: Broth- 
er W. T. Morgan and Elders R. IT. Herring. Edward Long 
and D. -). Hunt. Report adopted. 

Ekier A. \\ Sorrells. of eoniniittee. read as foUows : 
DIGEST OF ASSOCIATION CHURCH LETTERS 

STATISTICS 

We find reported 291 baptisms, against 337 last year, a loss of 
46; received by letter, 116, against 195 last year, a loss of 79; re- 
stored, 27, against 36 last year, a loss of 9; dismissed by letter, 174. 
against 197 last year, a gain of 23: excluded, 27, against 37 last 
year, a gain of 10; died, 45, against 41 last year, a loss of 4. 

JTNAiSXES 

Thirteen churches gained in contributions to State Missions, 
while 15 lost; 15 gained in contributions to Home Missions, while 
12 lost; 11 churches gained in contribution to Foreign Missions, 
while 15 lost; 8 churches made a gain in their contributions to the 
Thomasville Orphanage, while 19 lost; 12 churches increased pas- 
tors' salaries, while 10 churches show a decrease: 13 churches 
increased the Minute fund, while 17 decreased it. 

We find many of letters not accurately proposed; also the col- 
lection of them at present is very unsatisfactory. 

We insist that no moneys be sent with the letters to the Asso- 
ciation Clerk, but that all contributions be sent dtrect to Walters 
Durham, at Raleigh, or to our Association Treasurer, W. A. Har- 
rill. at Rutherfordton. N. C. 

A. .P SOKRELI.S, 

H. C. Marley. 

Committee. 

The report was discussed by both std)scribers to the 
report, and adopted. 

A further collection of $15.09 was taken to supplement the 
Minute Fund, which will appear in connection wdtli former con- 
tributions to this object. See Financial Exhibit. 

The Clerk was intrusted to increase the amounts (jriven Ias1 



1<S 

year by the churche.s to State and llonie Missions, and to the 
Baptist Orphanage by an addition of ten per cent. 

Elder Edward Long offered the following, which was adopt- 
ed without discussion : 

Resolved, That we instruct the Moderator of this Association 
before the close of each session to appoint the chairman of each of 
the committees, who is expected to write and discuss reports at 
next session, that the appointment may be recorded in the Minutes, 
and that the appointment for these committees may be duly notified. 

Under this resolution the Moderator appointed the following 
chairmen for the session of 1913: 

Education and Round Hill School, W. T. Morgan; Thomasville 
Orphanage, W. F. Flack; Ministerial Relief, Elder D. P. Ix)uder- 
milk; Biblical Recorder, J. H. Smith; Ministerial Education, Elder 
Z. T. Whiteside; State of Religion, Elder B. B. Harris; State 
Missions, Elder L. G. L. Taylor; Home Missions; Elder Edward 
Long: Foreign Missions, Elder R. H. Herring; Sabbath Schools, El- 
der A. P. Sorrells; Temperance, Elder H. C. Marley; Woman's Work, 
Elder W. L. Haynes; Digest of Letters, Elders A. P. Sorrells, H. 
C. Marley, and Brother J. L. Taylor 

Klder Edward Long read the following 

Whereas, all the subjects relative to the world-wide, state, and 
associational work of our denomination are discussed at every ses- 
sion of the Association; and it is desired and considered indispen- 
sible that all pastors of churches within the Association should be 
present at each and every session to take part in the discussions 
and deliberations lOf the body in order that they may contribute 
interest and enthusiasm, and to gain renewed inspiration from 
these proceedings; and, therefore, to be the better prepared to sti^ 
and enthuse, and lead their people when they return to their re- 
spective churches. Therefore, be it resolved: 

First, That we, the delegates composing the Green River Associ- 
ation, urge all pastors to attend all sessions of the body. 

Second, That we recommend to the churches that they insist 
ui>on their pastors attending at all times when not prevented by 
serious providential interference. 

Third, We recommend that the churches hereafter call in so 
far as is possible only pastors who will attend and show an inter- 
est in all the deliberations of the body; and 

Fourth, We recommend that the churches instruct the dele- 
gates whom they send to the Association to represent them, to 
instruct them to remain through the last session of the Associa- 
tion. Signed, 

KmVAR.V) ly^XG. 



19 

Al'ter the adoption vf tiie foregoing resolutions, on motion, 
the Clerk was authorized to send a marked copy of the Min- 
utes to every non-attending j)astoi' having work in the (Ireen 
River Associatioji. 

On motion, adjourned to 2 i). m. 

AFTERNOON SP^SSIOX 

The Association re-assembled at 2 p. m. and was \e(\ in 
prayei^ by Brother A, W. Gilliam, who read the report on 
STATE OF RELIGION 

We are glad to say that we believe that the spirit of religion in 
this Association is good, that this fact has been t'elt and seen while 
here together and by the reports sent in; yet it is not what it 
should be, and we feel assured it will be. When the pastors and 
the churches can be made to more fully realize the worth of im- 
mortal souls, and get the same impressed on our minds, the more 
earnest and enthusiastic we will be in the salvation of men, and 
in advancing the causes of our several boards. 

We recommend that we pray God that He make us more si)ir- 
itual and us to do moi'e foi' the cause. 

A. W. Gn.LiAM. 
R. Leuuettf:!!. 

W. B. WH.SON, 

Committee. 
After remarks by the reader, the report was adopted. 
Elder L. G. L. Taylor presented the following, which was 
adopted with discussion : 

NOMINATIONS 
To Southern Baptist Convention — Elder R. H. Herring; alter- 
nate. Elder D. J. Hunt. 

To State Baptist Convention — Elder Edward Long; alternate, 
Elder H. C. Marley. 

L. G. L. Tavlok. 

D. P. LOUDEKMU-K, 

L. D. Hemphill. 

Committee. 
The following, presented by the chairman of the commit- 
tee, was also adopted without discussion : 

TIME, PLACE AND INTRODUCTORY SERMON—NEXT SESSION 

Time^ — Thursday before first Sunday in October, 1913. 

Place — Mount Vernon Baptist Church, Rutherford County, N. C. 

Introduotory Sermon — Elder W. L. Haynps; alternate, Elder G. 



2( ) 

(1. OWeill. Signed by the committee, 

Z. T. Whitesidk, 
R. F. Hughes, 
D. C. Bkown. 
The report oi] History follows : 

Complying with the request of a year ago I submit a sketch of 
Bethel Baptist church, prepared by brother A. L. Bright. No re- 
sponse has been made by Coopers Gap church. 

It is again recommended that the latter and Armstrong church- 
es be urged to forward a brief history of these churches to the un- 
dersigned not later than September 1st, 1913. 

A. L. RucKKu, Historian. 
Rej)ort adopted. 

The history of Bethel church was also read, but owing to 
;i want of available funds, the historian was ordered to trans- 
cribe same in a book kept by him for this special purpose. 

The trustees of Round Hill School, elected for ensuing as- 
sociational year follow : 

Elder R. H. Herring, chairman, and brethren W. A. Harrill, W, 
T. Morgan, Mi. H. Justice and J. D. Morris. 

The following presented by Brother W. T. Morgan was 
luiauimously adopted by a rising vote: 

Resolved, That the thanks and sincere appreciation of this As- 
sociaton be expressed by a rising vote to the good people of Bills 
Creek and vicinity for their warm welcome and generous and gra- 
:ious hospitality. 

On motion, the JModerator appointed brethren B. B. Price. 
W. T. ^Morgan, and Elder Edward Long to fix program, ap- 
point speakers, give publicity to, and otherwise make such ar- 
rangements as may be necessary for the next fifth Sunday 
meeting, which is to convene with Round Hill church at 8 
{). m. on Friday evening before fifth Sunday in March, 1913. 

The following committees of last year were reappointed for 
the next associational year: 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF MISSIONS AND SUNDAY 
SCHOOLS 

R. H. Herring, chairman; W. A. Harrill, R. P. Geer, J. D. Mor- 
ris, Edward Long and J. L. Tajior. 

The committees named to audit the Treasurer's account were: 
Brethren T. C. Smith and A. L. Grayson. 



21 

After aniioniicements, fixed by the committee on re- 
ligious exercises for tomorrow, adjourned to meet with the 
Blount Vernon Baptist church on Thursday before first Sun- 
day in October, 1913. 

A. L. Ruckler, Clerk. D. J. Hunt, Moderator. 

MORNING SERVICES 

Sunday, October 6, 1912. 

Assembled in the house at 10 a. m. 

Religious exercises were conducted by Elder A. P. Sorrells, 
using the first division of the Psalms and leading the prayer. 

Brother P. F. Searcy presided over the Sunday school 
mass meeting, and called the speakers, who were limited in 
their remarks to 15 minutes each. These follow in the order 
in which they were called: Elders H. C. Marley. Edward Long. 
A. P. Sorrells, and Brother W. T. Morgan. 

These exercises were followed by sermon by Elder B. B. 
Harris, who preached from I Cor. 13 :13, his theme being. 
Charity and Love, prayer being offered before the sermon 
by Elder D. J. Hunt, and at its close b}^ Elder Edward Long. 
Elder B. B. Harris pronouncing the benediction. 

AFTERNOON 
Elder R. PL Herring read St. Luke 11:1-13. Elder B. B. 
Harris lead in prayer. 

Elder R. H. Herring preached the closing sermon from St. 
Luke 11 :2 — ' ' Thy kingdom come. ' ' 

Prayer was offered by Elder 1). A. Hunt, and final bene- 
diction by Elder R. H. Herring. 



CHURCH DIRECTORY. 

Churches, Pastors, and Their Post Offices. 

-\iiii.~5trojiij W. ¥. McMahjui Sunny \'ulc 

IJothel — F. M. Ilnggins Union Mill> 

flethleliem-^ H. C. Marlev Old Fort 

J'>eulali, 1911" T. W. Arledoo Melvin Hill 

l?ig Level— J. B. Arledge Saluda 

Hill's Creek— W. L. Haynes Gilkey 

( amp Creek — B. ^I. Hamrick Forest City 

< ane Cieek — \V. A. Morris Hendersonvillf 

Chapel Hill- G. H. Weaver Glen Alpine 

Cherry Spring — H. C. Marley Old Foit 

Clear' Creek— W. F. MeMahan Sunny Vale 

Columbus — J. M. Walker 

'Jooper's Gap — W. A. Morris Henderson vi 11 «■ 

Dysartsville— P. J. Sliell Shell 

l^ast Marion — D. P. Loudermilk Marion 

Kureka— Z. T. Whiteside Uroc 

< ;lenwood — F. M. Huggins Union Mill.- 

Hall Town— P. J. Shell Shell 

Harmony Grove — A. P. Sorrells Nebo, R. 1 

Hickory Grove — R. d. Tate Fingerville, S. ( '-. 

■ lesse's Grove — Not represented. 

Macedonia — B. B. Harris Cliffsidc 

Marion — Edward Long Marion 

Mill Spring— T. J. Moss Forest Cit> 

Montford's Cove — F. M. Huggins Union Mills 

Mountain Creek — D. J. Hunt Union Mills 

Mount Pleasant— L. G. L. Taylor Gilkey 

.Mount Vernon — R. H, Herring Rutherfordton 

.Mountain View — T. W. Arledge Henrietta 

( )ld Fort— H. C. Marley .' Old Fort 

Pepper's Creek, 101 1— Reuben Pitman Spruce Piiif 

Piney Knob — W. L. Haynes Rutherfordton 

Pleasant Grove- B. M. Hamrick Forest Cit\ 

Pleasant Hill — B. P. Jackson Columbu.-- 

Kock Si)ring — L. G. L. Taylor Gilkey 

Pound Hill— R. H. Herring Rutherfordton 

Pound Knob— No pastor. 

Ivutlierfordton--R. H. Herring Rutherfordton 

Snnny Vale, 101 1 W. F. MeMahan Sunny Vale 

Silver Creek- — 1. B. Arledge .Saluda 

Stone Mountain -L. G. L, Taylor Gilkey 

Turkey Cove, 1910— J. R. Boone EstatoV 

U'alnut Grove — Not represented. 

Whiteside Valley — W. L. Haynes Rutherfordton 

W'oodlawn — J. R. Wayeaster 

■/ion Hill- H, (\ Marley .Old Fort 

Churches, Clerks, and Their Post Offices. 

.\iinstrong— M. K. Hollilield Woodlawn 

P>ethel— R. P. Morris Sugar Hill 

iU'thlehem- A. W. Gilliam Old Fort, R. L> 

Peulah, 1911 — T. R. Splaine Mill Sprini; 

r.io Level, (i, \V. Smith Mill Sprin- 



23 

lUll-8 Creek W. ('. Daltun ^Uree, R 1 

( amp Creek -H. Biogerstatr ^r,?\^^^."' 

( :ane Creek- M. A. Searcey • ^^^11 Sprin<r 

Chapel Hill~B. F. Corpening OUI Fm-t 

Clierry Spring- 0. W. Robertson ■ ■ • • • 0^ ^oit 

Clear Creek-V. i). Long ^>5'^ l^o^'t. ^- 2 

iolumbus-L. H. Cloud. , • ■ ^^""^ 

cooper's Gap -J. T. Jackson Mill Spring 

I Jysartsville -L. G. Price Dysartsville 

Kast Marion-W. 0. Wylie ^^rion 

iaireka— A. 8. Whiteside - • • • ^]^' 

(.lenwood-L. A. Rabiirn ^^alsvilK 

tiall Town— J. C. Burnett v i ''p"'"i 

tiarmonv Grove- F. L. Simmons. . , • ■ • -Aebo K. i 

Hickory" Grove-A. L. Pittman Landrum, S. ( 

Jesse Grove—Not represented. 

Macedonia-G. F. Rhom ^ <^^^^ MomitaiL 

Marion-B. B. Price ;,; • • -^^^^ 

Mill Spring-J. J. Lambright TV"--^''"'vr'i, 

Montford's Cove -E. S. Harris Union Mb 

Mountain Creek 8. D. Lewis Green Hib 

Mount Pleasant— J. C. Ownby - • • • ■ ^o™* 

Mount Vernon~L. T. Rollins ^o^-est C^t) 

Mountain View- -H. D. Jackson xS i ! 

Old Fort— Login Lackey ^.V vr+v'ii 

l>epper's Creek, 101 1-H. F. Bro^^ n Mt. Mitclieb 

PiAey Knob-M. R. Camp Rutlierfordto.. 

I'leasant Giove-R. Ledbettei- ^ • • • -Uree, R. 2 

Pleasant Hill-E. P. White Kuthertordton K. . 

Kock Spring-H. M. Whiteside Mill Spring 

Round Hill--W. F. Flack ^F^^^^}/^? ^ 

Round Knob-J. N. Bartlett ^Graphitevilk 

Kutherfordton-J. H. Hill - Rutherfordton 

Sunny Vale, 11)1 1 M. P. Padgett f^^^^^J ^ah- 

Silver Creek-H. P. Arledge ^ • • Mill Spring 

Stone Mountain- -C. M. Nanney •^^^^nl^l'ff *,''\'; 

J'urkey Cove. 1010-M. P. Lowery ^;Mt. Mitche 1 

Whiteside Valley-Guilford Nannov - • Chimney Rock 

\Voodlawn--M. L. Good A^^'r?" , 

'/Aon Hill-G. G. Pindeigras.s • O'^l t^«»J 

Note~-A]) po>^t onicos ill North Cai-olina ijiih-ss otln-j-wis^- given. 



24 



REPORT OF SECRETARY AND TREASURER ROUND HILL SCHOOL 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING MAY 7, 1912. 

Statistical. 

Number of teachers employed . ; 

Number of scholars enrolled 

Number of students graduated 

Number of ministerial students 

Financial. 



To total school expenses. 

By receipts of school 

To balance due Treasurer 



150 



Dr. 

$;i.757.75 



Or. 

.$3,739.82 
17.03 



$3,757.75 $3,757. 8.i 
Hy tuition. uii})aid 207.04 - 

R. H. HERRING, 
Chm. Board of Trustees. 

J. D. MORRIS, 
Secretary and Treasurer. 



25 



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2() 



PLEDGES AND APPORTIONMENTS. 



CHURCHES 



a; 

'a 



£•1 



.\rmstron;Li js? 

Iletbel ; 

Hethlehpni [ 

!>eiilah 

Ki<^ Level 

P>iirs Creek ' 

(amp Creek ; 

i.'ane Creek j 

Chapel Hill I 

*. lierry Spririi^ 

' lear Creek .• i 

I 'olumbus I 

I ooper's (lai» i . 

Uysartsville i . 

I'last Marion i 

r^]ureka ! 

i.';lenwoo<;l I 

Tlari Town j 

Harmony Crovc i 

Hickory Grove I . . 

■ iesse'S Grove i , . 

Macedonia I 

Marion | 

.\rill Spriiig : 

,\fontford's Com- i . . 

Mountain Creek ; 

AFount Pleasant 

.Mount Vernon ; 

Mountain View 

' )!d Fort 

I'epper's Creek 

riney Knob I 

I'lcasant Grove - 

IMeasant Hill ' 

Kock iSprinii' 

Uound Hill i 

Hound Kiiol) \. . 

Uuthei-fordton ! 

"^ilver Creek | 

Stone Mountain ! 

"lunny Vale I . . 

i'urkey Cove j. . 

Walnut Grove ! . . 

Whiteside Valley j 

Woodlawn | 

Zion Hill ! 



1.00j$ |, 

2.001 12.40J 
2.00! 0.00 1 



•3-1 .2 



] . 50* 



2.00 
3.00 
1.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2 . 00 
2.00 



1.75 
3.05 
3.30 
1.10 



.001 



3.00' 
3.001 
3.30i 
1.10^ 
5.001 



1.00! 
l.OOi 
3.00| 

i.oo!, 

3.00! 



10.75! 

1.25J 
7.50^ 
5.50' 
1.10:. 

e.4o! 

I 

8.35; 
2.20:. 



2.20! 

12.901 
1.25| 

1 . 50; 
4.40' 



3.70! 

4.40! 
5.50J 



2.001$. 
20 . OOJ 
!).00j. 
3.00i. 
5.00' 
9.00J 
O.OOI 
3.00| 
5.001 

o.ooj 

5.00i 
ll.OOJ 
3. 00 1 
7.00 
3.00 
8 . 00 
0.00 
3.00 
0.00 
5 . 00 



0.45 



2.70 

5 . 50 

4.40 

4.65 

15.40 

11.00 

10.75 

9.50 

3.30 

3.50 

4.40 

1.10 

11.60 

2.20 

10.00 

1.25 



2.00J 

lO.OOJ 

2.00| 

5.00| 

1.00', 

5.00! 
i.ool 

5.00 



83.551 

2. 751 

17.001 

lO.oOj 



2.20| 
70.751 

2.75J 
17.10! 
34.10' 



25.30 

3.30 

10.50 



26.25! 

I 1.65| 
11.10 



0.001 
80.00 
lO.OOj 
20.00j 
40.00j 

l.OOj, 
40.00J 

4.00J 
I8.OO1 



3.80 
90 . 50) 

2.75 
14.00 
28.50 



19.20 

2.75 

22 25 



1.001 
2.00: 
2.00^ 
1.00; 
5.00: 



2.20J 
3.75! 
5.50^ 
2.20! 
22.00! 



2.Y01 
3.75! 
5.50i 
1.1 ol 



4.00i 

6 . 00; 

22.001 

5.00; 



27.50! 40.001 



2.20 
f> . 00 
5.50 
1.75 
14.50 



O.OOi 

i.ooi 

1.00! 



llO.OOi 

1.10! 



.00 1 3.05 

,00'i 

.00 1.65 



TotaU 



1$ 88.0()j$393.20 



55.00| 120.00 

3.00 

j 1.00 

2 . 00 



110.00 
2.75 



2.20 



3.20 
1.25 



$328.30 



.00 



4.00 4.80 

2.20 

1.30 

$559.00:$45T.25 



o 

3.0(1 
54.35 
17.0(1 

3 . 0( I 
14.45 
24.75 
18.00 
1 1 . 85 
32.4(1 
22.00 
10.95 
40.15 

8.80 
19.5(t 
18.30 
11.20 
30.70 
10.60 
35 . 85 

8.45 



14.00 

340.80 

20.25 

68.10 

124.10 

2.00 

115.75 

12.70 

72.85 



12.15 
22.10 
40.50 
11.05 
109.00 



40,- 



00 
7.85 
2.00 
4.20 



17.65 
3.20 
7.20 

$1,822775 



I lie foiK.iwiji 
>r the vuii(^iif 



table 
jbjeet^ 



^llo\\•s the amount 
bv the eluirehes: 



t 111 \n t 



CHURCHES 


■■ 

r. 

'x 

X 


Home Missions. 

1 


Foreign Missions. 


Sunday School 
Missions. 

Orphanage. 


■ X 

< 


x" 


! 

I ^ 
1 1 


\rmst]*on<' 


$ 


% 


% 


% \% 


.1^ 


$ 1.00 

l.GO 

1 .50 

.75 

2.00 

.40 

.30 

1.00 

1 .50 


$ i.ou 

43.58 

14 , 75 


l?ethel 1 

Dethleliem 


11.20 
5.25 
4.70 
3.30 
3.00 
1.00 
4.50 


7.44 


2.48 


' 1 8.42 

. ...1 fi.OO 


2.35i 
2 . 00 
2.40 
2.05 



2 . 00 


I)ig Level 

Hill's Creek .... 
( 'amp Creek .... 
Cane Creek 


1 2.75 
3.25 

3 . 00 
1.00 

4 . 50 


i 2 . 75 

! 4 . 00 

1 3.10 

1 . 00 


1 1.80 

1 5.00 

i 4.00 

t 4.20 


15.5 5 
19.cn 

13.5(1 
7 . 5o 


Chapel Hill 

C'lear Creek .... 


3.25 




1 . OOj 


1G.25 
1.5(i 


( olnmbiis ' 


4.00 


4 . 00 
1.00 


5 . 00 


1 


1 


13.00 


Cooper's Gap ... 
Kureka 


1 2.00 


4 . 00| 

1 


.70 
1.40 
1.00 
2.30 

.40 
1.90 
1.00 

.50 
3 00 


7.7tt 




i 


1.4(1 


h]ast Marion . . . 


1.00 






1 1.00 


1.15! 

i 


4 . ] 5 


Clenwood 1 






i 


2 3't 


Hall Town 

Harmonv Grove, i 


2.50 
3.00 
1.00 


2..-,0 


2.50 


i 2.00 


.50j 


10. 40 

4 9«> 


Hickory Grove .. 
-Macedonia 


1.00 






1 . 00 



1-00 

! 2.00 

1 


1.00 

.20| 


6.0(1 
2.70 
3 00 


Mill Springs .... 







1 10.27 

2.00 

53.45 

3 50 


i 

\''-'' 


5.25! 

i 

1 


" K 10 
2.50 
1.40 

.60 
1.50 

.70 
1.70 
2.50 

.30 

.40 
2.50 
3 . 00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.10 
1.20 


13.52 


Montford's Cove 






3.10 


.Mountain Creek. 
Mt. Vernon 


23.00 
9.80 
3.00 


11.05 
1 . 50 


116.75 

14 70 


Mt View 


2 50 


3 00 


i.oo 


11 GO 


< )ld Fort . . . 




1 


1 50 


Piney ,Knob .... 
IMeasant Grove . 
Pleasant Hill . . . 


2.50 
2.50 
5 . 00 


2.00 
2.50 
5.00 


2.50 
2.50 

15.00 


1 2.00 

i 8.50 

1 5 . 00 

■ 


2.00 


9.1(t 
17.7(t 
34.5(t 

30 


Rock Sj)rings . . . 

Round Hiir < 

Rutherfordton . . ! 
Sunny Vale ... 


2.00 
17.05 
42 . 30 


1.00 
49.41 


1.00 
20 . 50 

59 . 05 


i 

■ 2 00 


1.00 
9.40 

■■■:5oi 

2.40! 


6.90 

40.95 

163.10 

3 00 


Silver Creek .... 
Whiteside Valleyj 
Wood lawn 


1.00 
3 . 30 


1 . 00 
2.89 


1.00 
1.13 


1 100 

1 4.3'd 


5.50 

15. IS 

1 2(t 


Zion Hill 











i i 


1 . lOl 


1.10 














Totals ...|$156.80i$107.()9| 


$209 . 48|$ 1 . 00i$00. 63|$38 . 30j$44 . 15| 


$648.14 



■"$15.10 collected at Association for minutes not included here. See finai 
<-iaI exhibit by Clerk. 
This October 7, 1912. 

Respectfully submitted. W. A. HARRELL, 

Treasure)- Green River Association. 
We ijpjirove above !-e)30)-t. 

A. L. (JRAV80N, T. C. SMITH. 
Auditinu Committee. 



•|).)zij(Ih{1 



•u.)d<) 
;(l.)\|; sen no it 



'(Z; -^ rsj c: i>J iM 



ui)>i«x s.iad^;j' 



O O CC' O fM 



!M !ja G<I « Ct « 'M ko 



"M fM 01 (M (M (M a I- f>i 'U rj ?M (M <M f^^ iM 0^1 (M IC O: (M M 1^ 



r^ GO 'M r^ TC >o 'Tt^ o 10 r-i o; tc 

— 'M 0-1 — 




1 2 









O 



o <: ^ 



o o o 

o s5 



g3 ^ <v 






^ H^ ^- 2 P 



i C5 



9^Q 

6 2 



2 "^ 

O 
o 



p p 

2 s^ 
^ O 



^ Sis 



2. Q 






c o 



C P 

►- Hi 

P !^ 



O -5-^P 



^S c P ii *- 
p^ S ^ 2^^ 



c r- 






, c ~ CO ::d 



3 



ii l>i +- IC ■ *;. 4^ IC IC Oi 



T- — ' ^ Gc o — ' in;> ic ^1 -j^ 



o ^ :c wi i<. :^i — ■ ic 



i-owicoci— x:c — i-O'— i-cc»c:ox 



— 1 « o cc — tc 






' ti:t <Xi o\ ^ 



ww4i.4i-t>i'<:oioc;(»wi4i-totooNjtf^oiO':ccc 
rf^CTah-^Oi^ThSOtOO O C/i O K) 4^ M OS 00 O '-' i— ' 



t^t Oi to I—' w tCbi*--!-- 

r ic — vi J^ '1 re a« !X o o oc 4^ o w v< cc •-T' c — 









K) Lv -1- Lc y- tc :;i 



l^O k— i3< rji' Oi Ol W OO «i 4^^ Ci W to C5 OS ts 
Oi Oi ^ -.1 "<l t>5 O Oi J^SO tC O O QO CO *- CO 



Sunday 
Preacliinii. 



I Baptized. 

'Received by 
! Letter. 



Restored. 

[Dismissed bv 
j Letter. 

i Excluded. 
Died. 

Totfil (Jain. 
Total Loss. 
Males. 



Totnl. 



FINANCIAL i:XHIBlT 



CHURCHES 


Pastors' 
Salaries. 


Building and 
Repairs. 


Incidentals. 


Sunday School 
Expenses. 


The Poor. 




State Missions. 
Home Missions. 


Foreign .Missions. 





Round Hill 

Scliool. 


_. 't 

— 5 *-' 

:=^ , 


Armstrong |$ 25.30 

]]othel 100.00 


$ 


$ . . . 


$ 5.65 
4.00 
7.00 
2.10 


$ 21.05 
5.00 


$ .70 
1.90 


$ 


$ i,^ .s m L* \^ 






11.29 


9.54 12.48' 8.67 
7 oOl (> 00 


! 


KpfhU^hem . • . 


100.00 
40.00 
52 50 






2.00] 5.35 
I 


i 


l^eulah (1910) 

l>ig Level 

liill's Creek ..... 


21.55 


9.50 




1 i i j ; 




1 1 . 55 
6 . 50 


1.25 1.55 

3.10 3.30 

.90 3.00 

1.30! 1.00 


2 75 


1 7:^! •? J.0 


i i 


75.00 
67.26 
86.71 
42.25 
100 00 






5.10 


3.25| 4.00 5.00 
3.00j 3.00 4 00 


50 . 00 


! 


(%jiiiii C!rppk 










60.00 


" 13!60 


2.96 
7.35 
4.00 
9.54 
15.00 
2.29 


14.10 
" '2.31 


l.OOi 1.00 

4.50 3.25 


4.21 
14.00 
10.00 
9.35 
8 . 55 
3 . 00 
5.20 
1.00 
4 00 




... 


Clianel Hill 


1.25 

1.70 

2.00 

.50 

.55 


4.50 


i ! ' 


(!hprrv SDriii*^' ' 


[' 


Clear 'Creek : 65.73 

Columbus j 

Cooper's Gap 53 . 00 

Dysartsville i 35.40 

Ffl st Alarion fi 00 




9.00 
4.00 


'9!75 
1.00 
6.70 


2.00i 2.30 
11.70! 6.50 

i.ooj 

1.301 4 0^ 








Sol 










1.00 
.40 

2.30 
.90 
.50 

1.00 




.1 00 


1 : 




18.25 
50.00 
35.89 
68.00 
50.00 










5.00 
5.80 

■ '7'.57 
2.00 


4.00 


1 


(^^IpTIAVOOrl 


115.00 
17.30 

" 150^00 


14.30 
3.00 


11.23 
8.04 
6.65 





3.35] 3.80 
4.00' 2.00 


10.50 
2.00 
!) . 00 


2 00 i 


Tin 11 Town i 




Harmony Grove 


5.00 


5.25 

1 .30 


1 
















f 1 


ATacedonia 1 65 . 54 






5.10 


29.50 
6.00 


1.00 
4.00 
.50 
1.60 
3.00 
1.10 
2.20 
1.15 
3.00 


76.05 

2.50 

31.08 


2.00 

04.20 72.95 
2.501 2.77 


3 . 45 




Marion 


900.00 
100.00! 


500.00 


62.00 


87.75 


14 15 






Montford's Cove 100.00 






7.83 


"""8'. 00 


12.64 
25 85 


. 


Mountain Creek ) 120.80 

Mount Pleasant 42.15 


185.00 


52.15 


12.00 
4.65 

43.03 
1.25 

50.00 


15 00' 31 00 i i\:\ -^0 


i i 












^lount Vernon 250.00 




4.20 




23.00 

3.00 

18.00 


23.85 50.72 

1.50| 2.50 

15.00| 10.00 


17.40 

3.00 

20 . 00 






Mountain View i 35.00 






1 


Old Fort i 200.00 


72.00 


25.00 






•PpDner's Creek ' 








Pinev Knob ; 40.00 


500.00 


.50 
12.00 


6.00 
4.00 
8.00 
3.00 
58.00 




.60 
1.40 

.50 

.40 
2.85 

.30 
5.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1 00 


2.00 
3.33 
5.00 
2.00 
20.00 


2.50} 2.00 
3.33! 3.34 

5.00 15.00 

1.001 1.00 
25.00] 25.00 


2.00 




Pleasant Grove 1 75.00 


6.00 

5 . 00 

1.50 

13.15 




Plpasant Hill i 100.00 




Rock Spring { 63.00 

Round Hill i 210.00 

Pound Knob ... i 40.00 










15.00 


2.301 . 

; 1 


Rutherfordton 1 700.00 

Silver Creek | 60.00 

Stone Mountain . j 35.00 


190.00 
900.00 


85.00 
4.50 


35.00 
5.08 
3.00 
7.00 


25.00 
1.25 

8.00 


100.00 
1.00 


50.00| 100.00 
1 1.00 

1 


100.00 
2 50 


100.00 5.00 < 

;. 









Sunny Vale ... , 19.10 

"'^Turkey Cove ... . 1 













2.00 




















"Walnut Grove . . . ' 




1 








I 






1 


Whiteside Valley ... | 66.15 


17.50 


1 3.79 




1.00 
1.20 


3 30 


9 so 1 1.-^ 


4.36 
2.00 
2.48 








40.00 
50.00 




5.00 
1 00 






Zion Hill j 






4.00 




1 50 1 12 




















Totals |.1>4,283.03| 


$2,728.35 


$ 353. 75 1$ 351.64] 


$ 138.86]$ 57.65 


$ 374.57]$ 287.28]$ 421.07 


$417.96 


$150.00 


$ 24.30]$ 7' 



Minute funds are increased by $15.10 at Association, which appears to the credit of the several churches above iti connection with 
*Not represented. 



BniDii iKills. N. 01. 

Our greatest need is the right type of trained 
leadership. 

ROUND HILL is training Christian leaders. 



We prepare for College, and give special prepara- 
tion for Merideth and Wake Forest. Music, Bible 
and Expression are given. Strong Faculty. 



Four Literary Societies. Four daily mails. Tele- 
phone and Telegraphic connection. 



Boarding halls for boys and girls separate. Excel- 
lent board for small cost. 



You have a splendid chance to make a good invest- 
ment here. 
Will you invest now? 



For catalogue or other information, address, 

Re¥. D. J. Hunt, 

Principal. 



MliNUTES 

OF THE 

SEVENTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION 

OF THE 

GREEN RIVER 
BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

HELD WITH - 

MOUNT VERNON BAPTIST CHURCH 

RUTHERFORD CO.. N. C. 

OCTOBER 2, 3, 4 and 5, A. D. 1913 




Next Session will be held with the church at Pleasant Hill, 
four miles southwest of Rutherfordton, N. C, beginning on 
Thursday before first Sunday in October, 1914. 



m 



"The Best Buggy I Ever Bought" 

That is what one of our customers told us the other day about a buggy 
he had bought from us. He said it was the best wearing, lightest 
running, best looking buggy he had ever had, and he had had several. 

Let us sell you your next buggy. You will be as well pleased as this 
customer was. We guarantee you satisfaction. You will find our bug- 
gies right and our prices right. We can sell you a better buggy. We 
will sincerely appreciate your trade and will treat you right. 

M. L. JUSTICE & SON 

Rutherfordton, N. C. 
Buggies, Harness. Hay, Grain and Feed. 

HARRILL BROTHERS 

DEALERS IN 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 
CARRIAGES, BUGGIES, HORSES AND MULES 

W. A. HARRILL, Manager 

RUTHERFORDTON, N. C. 

REID-ERWIN COMPANY 

Main Street, Rutherfordton, N. C. 

STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES 

Flour, Grain, Meats, FeedstufFs, Fruits, Vegetables, 
Confections, Etc., Etc. 

•Everything fresh and guaranteed true to name. Country- 
Produce bought, sold and exchanged. 

Try us whether you wish to buy or sell. Satisfaction Assured. 

The Miller Hardware Co. 

Rutherfordton, N. C. 
DEALERS IN STAPLE HARDWARE 

That will not break easily, but will wear until worn out — Stoves, 
Engine Fixtures, Farm Machinery, Cutlery^ — in fact everything ordi- 
narily needed by Architects, Engineers, Farmers, and the Public 
generally, and at prices as cheap as first class goods can be sold. 



MINUTES 

OF THE 

SEVENTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION 

OF THE 

GREEN RIVER 
BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

HELD WITH 

MOUNT VERNON BAPTIST CHURCH 

RUTHERFORD CO., N. C. 

OCTOBER 2, 3, 4 and 5, A. D. 1913 



Next Session will be held with the church at Pleasant Hill, four 
miles southwest of Rutherfordton, N. C, beginning on Thursday before 
first Sunday in October, 1914. 



LOFTIN & CO., PRINTERS 
GASTONIA, N. C. 



OFFICERS. 

Elder D. J. Hunt, Moderator Union Mills, N. C. 

Adin L. Ruckkr, Clerk Rutherfordton, N. C. 

W. A. Harrill, Treasurer . Rutherfordton. N. C. 



ORDAINED MINISTERS. 

Arlege, J. B Saluda, N. C. 

Denton, J. R Dysartsville, N. C. 

Harris. B. B Dysartsville, N, C. 

Haynes, W. L Gilkey, N. C. 

Herring, R. H Rutherfordton, N. C. 

Hunt, D. J Union Mills, N. C. 

Laughter, B. C Bob, N. C. 

Long, Edward Marion, N. C. 

Loudermilk, D. P Marion, N. C. 

McMahan, W. F Sunny Vale, N. C. 

Marley, H. C. . . . . Old Fort, N. C. 

Mashburn, A. B Nealsville, N. C. 

Sorrels, A. P Nebo, N. C. 

Taylor, L. G. L Union Mills, N. C. 

Weaver, G. H Nebo, N. C. 

Whiteside, Z. T Uree, N. C. 

LICENTIATES. 

McDaniel, T. C Demming.N. C. 



PROCEEDINGS. 



Mt. Vernon Baptist Church, 
Rutherford County, N. C, Thursday, Oct. 2, 1913. 

The seventy-third annual session of the Green River Baptist 
Association convened with this church at 11:15 this morning. 

Services began by singing, "All Hail the Power of Jesus' 
Name". Prayer was offered by Elder H. D. Harrill, of the 
Sandy Run Association, and former pastor of this church for 
fourteen years. 

Elder W. L. Haynes read the first chapter of the Second 
General Epistle of Peter, after which he preached the Opening 
or Introductory Sermon, from I. Chronicles 28:10, "Be 3^e 
strong and do it." Prayer; Elder R. H. Herring, leading. 

Elder D. J. Hunt, the Moderator, requested those having 
Associational letters to bring them forward and deposit same 
with Clerk. 

Enrollment slips were handed the messengers from the 
churches with request to write first, the name of the church 
from which they came, and second; their owm names as 
representatives. These will appear later under the names of 
their respective churches. 

Elders H. D. Harrill, G. G. O'Neill, and E. V. Hudson, 
of the Sandy Run, and John M. Walker, of the Spartanburg 
Association were recognized and welcomed by the Moderator. 

Elders W. M. Green, representing the Biblical Recorder; 
and M. L. Kesler, Superintendent of theThomasville Orphan- 
age, were also formerly welcomed to seats among us. 

Elder R. H. Herring, pastor Mt. Vernon Church, welcomed 
messengers and visitors present to the hospitalities of the 
church and vicinity. 



Minutes of the 



From a partial report by Elder R. H. Herring, Chairman 
on the order of Business, the Biblical Recorder, and the 
Thomasville Orphanage were the two topics to be specially 
considered this evening. 

Adjourned to 1:30 p. m. 

Benediction by Elder G. G. O'Neill. 

AFTERNOON SESSION. 

The Association met pursuant to adjournment, prayer 
being offered by Elder M. ly. Kesler. 

Additional messengers were enrolled, the Moderator declar- 
ing a quorum present. 

The following list w^as present at some time during the 
session, and most of whom were present today: 

Armstrong— G. E. Byrd, G. R. Hall. 

BeTHEI.— F. P. Morgan, M. C. Morgan, G. C. Crawford, W. C. 
Raburn. 

BETHI^EHEM — J. M. Gibson, W. B. Parker. 

BeuIvAH— Not represented. 

Big Level— J. G. Skipper. 

Bill's Creek— J. C. McDaniel, M. W. Williams, W. M. Flynn. 

Camp Creek— J. C. Condrey, J. C. Guffey. 

Cane Creek — Represented by letter. 

Chapel Hill — B. F. Corpening, B. G. Hensley, John Kaylor. 

Cherry Spring— Samuel Murphy. 

Clear Creek — Daniel N. Walkar. 

Columbus — N. T. Mills, Ray Arledge. 

Cooper's Gap — Represented by letter. 

DysarTSVILLE— W. H. Taylor. 

East Marion— G. C. Dixon. W. E. Johnson. 

Eureka— Elder Z. T. Whiteside, G W. Whiteside. 

Glenwood — J. H. Raburn, J. C. England. 

Hall Town — Nathan Morgan, Will Morgan. 

Harmony Grove — Elder A. P. Sorrels, J. B. Lawing, J. H. Hensley, 
E. S. Brown. 

Hickory Grove— J. C. Stott. 

Macedonia — J. T. Wise, Geo. F. Rhom. 

Marion — Elder Edward Long, B. B. Price. 

Mill Spring— J. J. Lambright, J. R. Phillips 



Green River Baptist Association. 



MoNTFORDS CovR — Not Represented. 

Mountain Creek— U. E. Keeter, S. D. Lewis, J. H. Flack, J. L. 
Bennett, Zeno Flack, J, P. Hyder. 

Mount PIvEasant — Represented by letter. 

Mount Vernon— J. T. Lewis, G. W. Geer, VV. L. Walker, J. G. 
Logan, J. M. Egerton. 

Mountain View— N. C. Burgess. 

Old Fort— Elder H. C. Marley. 

Piney Knob— J. H. Parton. 

Pleasant Grove— W. L. Bland, H. B. Elliott. 

Pleasant Hill— P1 P. White, Charles Hodge, John Owens, D. C. 
Nanney, C. E. Hill. 

Peppers Creek— Not represented. 

Rock Spring---R. M. Clark. I. S. Williams. 

Round Knob — Not represented. 

Round Hill— Elder L. G. L. Taylor, Z. V. Morris, C. J. Flack, Wm. 
M. Nanney. J. D. Morris, R. H. Barnes. 

RUTHEREORDTON— Elder R. H. Herring, W. A. Harrill, R. P. Geer, 
J. L. Taylor, W. C. Justice. 

Silver Creek— Represented by letter. 

Stone Mountain— Represented by ietter. 

Sunny Vale— Elder W. F. McMahan. 

Turkey Cove— A. H. Lowery, R. P. Burnett. 

Whiteside Valley— F. L. Shitle. 

Woodlawn— J. R. Baxter. 

ZiON Hill — Elder D. P. Loudermilk, J. M. Pendergrass, J. O. Pender- 
gras's. 

Jesse's Grove — Not represented. 

Summary— Of the forty-five churches listed, thirty-five were 
represented by both letters and messengers; five were repre- 
sented by letters only; and five were not represented in any 
way. 

On motion of Elder R. H. Herring, the rules were suspend- 
ed, and Elder D. J. Hunt was unanimously re-elected 
Moderator for ensuing Associational Year. Under a similar 
motion by Elder Edward Long, A. L. Rucker was re-elected 
Clerk, and W. A. Harrill. Treasurer of the Association. 

It was announced that the Woman's Missionary Societies 
would meet immediately in the school building near the church. 

No response was made to the Moderator's call for new 
membership. 



Minutes of the 



The pastor and deacons of Mt. Vernon Church were 
designated as the "Committee on Religious Exercises." 

Elder W. B. Green read 

REPORT ON BIBLICAL RECORDER. 

The Biblical Recorder for about seventy-eight years has been the 
organ of our Baptist State Convention. It is the only paper of the kind 
covering the whole State in the interest of the whole denomination. As 
its name implies, it is distinctly Biblical, and sets forth from week to 
week in its pages the great fundamental doctrines of salvation. It also 
gives the Baptist belief in regard to the great doctrines of the Bible, it 
is essential to the highest development and greatest efficiency of a North 
Carolina Baptist. It brings our people in touch with the work of our 
denomination, and gives them information that they can get nowhere 
else. 

There is not much interest without information, and we all need the 
news about the work that the Recorder gives every week. Ever}^ 
home needs the influence of some good religious newspaper: The chil- 
dren are going to read something, and they need a good religious 
newspaper to give them the correct ideals of life. They will not get a 
Christian ideal from the ordinary daily paper. 

Again, it helps the local church for its members to read the Recorder. 
The church whose members are readers of the Recorder are doing more 
for all the objects of the Convention than those whose members do not 
read it. 

We recommend that the people put the Recorder a little closer to their 
hearts, and give it a place in every home. 

Committee, 

W. M. Green 
E. P. White 
Chas. Hodge 
J. G. Logan 
Bruce Parker 

On motion to adopt, this report was discussed by Elders W. 
M. Greene, H. C. Marley, J. M. Walker and M. L. Kesler, 
and adopted. 

Elder R. H. Herring Chairman, read report on Order of 
Business for entire session. Since the topics mainly occupy 
the times designated in the report, it needs no repetition here. 



Grken River Baptist Association. 



The assigment of messengers and visitors to their respective 
homes followed. 

The report on Baptist Orphanage not having been prepared, 
the subject was discussed by Elders M. L. Kesler, the Super- 
intendent, R. H. Herring and D. J. Hunt. 

The report was submitted Saturday afternoon and adopted 
without further discussion, as follows: 

REPORT ON ORPHANAGE. 

The first child was received into the Orphanage November ii, 1885. 
Since that time 1,420 children have been enrolled, and the present 
number is 441. The average cost per child is about $100.00 a year and 
must come from the churches and Sunday Schools since from the current 
funds the meat and bread must be bought. At present, one thind of the 
Sunday Schools in the State are making monthly collections which sup- 
ply forty per cent of the current fund. A great number of our churches 
are making Thanksgiving Day a special time for remembering the 
Orphanage. It is strongly insisted that all the churches of our Associa- 
tion give special heed to Thanksgiving Day with a collection for the 
Orphanage, and that any Sunday Schools that are not making a monthly 
collecting begin and continue this feature of church work. 

Gifts amounting to over $50,000 have been made to the Orphanage this 
year which, when officially linked with our contributions, will be money 
wisely invested in children which the ages will declare the dividend in 
another coin. 

All children making application for admittance are not received, not 
because they are not eligible or worthy; but because we. Baptists are to 
some extent negligent in our duty toward the fatherless children by not 
having prepared sufficient food and shelter for them. Let us do our duty 
that none may be turned away. One hundred needy applicants are 
begging us now. What are you doing? 

Committee, 

B. F. CORPENING 
B. L. HENI.EY 

J. T. Lewis 
W. F. Flack 
J. J. Lambright 
Daniel Walker 

After announcements adjourned to 9:30 tomorrow. 
Benediction, Elder W. F. McMahan. 



Minutes of the 



SECOND DAY— Morning Session. 

Friday, October 3, 19 13. 

The Association met at 9:30 A. m. 

Devotional exercises were conducted by Elder J.M. Walker 
in the use of Second Peter 1:9, prayer being offered by Elder 
J. B. Carpenter of the M. E. Church, and Elder H. R. Brad- 
shaw, State Missionary for Western North Carolina. 

The Association was called to order by the Moderator. 

Minutes of yesterday read and approved. 

Elder H. R. Bradshaw was officially recognized. Elder J. 
B. Carpenter Secretary of District Conference of the M. E. 
Church, and Elder Albert Sherrill, pastor Rutherfordton 
Circuit, were also recognized and the usual courtesies extended. 

Upon call of Moderator several additional Associational 
Church letters were handed in and their respective messengers 
present yesterday, enrolled. 

Elder R. H. Herring read 

REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS. 

"The field is the world." "The uttermost part of the earth" is the 
limit of our territory. To stop short in our efforts to preach the gospel 
to every creature, is to disobey the plain mandate of our Master, and to 
disregard his will and purpose as revealed in His work and word. Our 
Foreign Mission work is a part of the expression of those, who would, 
in loving and willing obediance do His holy will. 

What has been accomplished, compared with the small beginning a 
century ago, is even marvelous; but compared with that which remains 
to be done, we are only fairly beginning. 

Some of the results visible in China, Africa, Japan, Italy, Mexico, 
Brazil and Argentina, are 358 churches with 27,545 members, 990 out- 
stations, 275 missionaries, 567 native helpers, 267 schools with 7,783 
students. The last Conventional year there were 4,532 baptisms. 

The most cheering sign of the times is the note of confidence and 
triumph which runs through all the reports of the missionaries. Amid 
the devastation of war in Mexico our workers tell of progress and bright 
prospects for the future. In Brazil and China the progress of the work 
is great, and the opportunities wonderful. In Italy and Japan the long 
seige is beginning to tell and the outlook brightens. There is gratifying 



Grken River Baptist Association. 



success also in Argentina and Africa. The many faithful and efficient 
native preachers and woikers give new hope and courage. From all 
around the world, the call of God, voiced in the progress of the work 
and its great needs bids us go onward. 

The Board is this week sending to China three new missionaries from 
North Carolina. Others are ready, and scores are preparing to go. The 
number of baptisims for the year is the largest in the history of the work. 

It is exceedingly encouraging that self-support and self-propagation 
is rapidly growing on many of the fields. 

With all these inspiring signs of God's smiles and blessings upon the 
work, and with all the faithful efforts of the Board's Agents and Secreta- 
ries and the Layman's Missionary Movement, the response by our 
churches to the call is shamefully meager, and inadequate to the in 
creasing progress and needs, and out of all proportion to our abilit}'. 
Does not this combination of facts constitute a mighty call for heart 
searching humiliation and prayer on the part of all our people? Will 
not our pastors wrestle with this great business of our Saviour until their 
blood is hot and their hearts are consuming with the passion for souls, 
and become flaming evangels for Foreign Missions? Will not all our 
people enlist in their Lord's service in this his great age-long and world 
wide enterprise, and wipe out the stigma upon the fair name of the bride, 
the Lamb's wife? How can we call ourselves his and expect his con- 
tinued blessings and do not the things he says ? 

It becomes the duty of this Committee to again call attention to the 
special enterprise of the Foreign Mission Board known as the Judson 
Centennial Equipment Fund. The Southern Baptist Convention in May, 
191 2 Called upon our people to give one million, two hundred and fifty 
thousand dollars for the equipment of the work fostered b}^ the Foreign 
Mission Board. The Fund is to be distributed as follows: $250,000 for 
general equipment, such as churches, missionarie's homes, hospitals, etc.; 
$200,000 for publications; $800,000 for schools of all kinds. A period of 
three years was fixed as the time in which pledges are to be taken for 
this fund. The money is to be given in addition to the regular annual 
gifts to the Foreign Mission Board for the current expenses. 

The movement is called the Judson Centennial because it was launched 
in celebration of the hundredth anniversary of the sailing of Adoniram 
Judson, the first American Missionary. Its magnitude was fixed by the 
urgent need of for the equipment of our missionaries who represent us 
at the front. Nothing short of a large program like this could properly 
commemorate the missionary spirit of Judson and take care of the 
distressing needs which throb in all of our fields. The success of this 
movement will help Southern Baptists to find their place in the world 
wide evangelization, it will increase several fold the efficiency of the 
missionary force we now have and will go a long distance forward in the 



Minutes of thk 



effort to train a native leadership. What a goal — the voidest vision at 
home and the maximum of efficiency abroad ! 

The churches of our Association should have their share in this mighty 
movement. 

We urge that an effort be made to enlist all our members in the work 
of Foreign Missions and that we do something worthy of this cause and 
of the Lord whom we claim to follow and serve. To do this will mean 
a decided increase in interest an>l contributions. 

P'oreign Mission work in this Association to be on same basis as last 
year's apportionment. 

R. H. Hp:rring 
J. O. Pendergrass 
J. M. Egerton 

After discussion by Elders R. H. Herring, W. R. Bradshaw 
and Dr. R. T. V^ann, the latter having been officially recognized, 
the report was adopted. 

See table of pledges and apportionments, the same as last 
year. 

Elder L. G. L. Taylor read 

REPORT ON STATE MISSIONS. 

Those who invest in any enterprise have a right to know how the 
money they invest is being applied and what there is to show in the way 
of results. 

The State Mission Boird is composed of eighty members from the 
State at large and one representative from each of the Associations. To 
these brethren is committed the important and difficult task of appor- 
tioning the funds contributed for State Missions. 

Those receiving salaries are the Corresponding Secretary, the Sunday 
School Secretary, the Treasurer, the Corresponding Secretary of the 
Woman's work and the stenographers. 

The Corresponding Secretary and Treasurer of the Convention are 
elected by the Convention and the Corresponding Secretary of the 
Woman's Missionary Union is elected by the W. M. U. Convention. 
The others are elected by the Board of Missions. 

We speak of the West, the East, and the Central Sections of the State. 
We do this for the sake of convenience, and for the further reason that 
conditions differ in these several sections. 

In the West, development is our task. W^e are appropriating to that 
territory this year 16,470, including the salary and traveling expenses of 
Rev. W. R. Bradshaw, who gives his whole time to that section and it is 
but fair, therefore, that his salary should be charged up to the West. 



Green River Baptist Association. ii 

We are also giving to the West $1,500 for church building, making total 
appropriation to that section $7,970. 

In the Piedmont or Central section, great changes are taking place 
because of the industrial awakening. It is necessary for the Board to 
expend a considerable amount of money in this region during the 
transition period. We have appropriated to the Central part of the 
State this year $19,528 including amount appropriated to church build- 
ing. In the East is to be found real mission work, because in that 
portion of the State exists our greatest destitution. Not all the East is 
destitute, for the Chowan region has been called the "Baptist Eden of 
North Carolina," and yet Hyde County, with only twenty-three Baptists 
and Dare County, with a hundred and fifty Baptists, are both in the 
Chowan Association. There are eighteen counties in the East in which 
the destitution is great. These are Dare, Hyde, Beaufort, Pamlico, 
Carteret, Onslow, Jones, Craven, Pitt, Martin, Washington, Halifax, 
Edgecombe, Nash, Wilson, Greene, Lenoir, Johnston. We are appro- 
priating to the East (including church building) $20,210. 

Let us glance at the report of last \ear, as that gives an idea of the 
results that come from the expenditures we make: We had last year 150 
missionaries, who preached at 325 churches and out-stations. The 
missionaries preached 10,150 sermons, held 231 meetings, Baptized 1,607 
received 1,393 by letter. They reported 2,627 professions of faith, 20 
houses of worship being built and 12 houses finished. 

The contributions of these mission points were as follows: 

Paid on pastor's salaries $26,898.42 

Church building 24,434.67 

Objects of Convention . 23,223.14 

Total $74,686.23 

It is entirely proper for those who take stock in any enterprise to 
know how much is absorbed by expense. If the management of any 
business is believed to be extravagant, it is the duty of those having 
stock to demand an investigation, and require from those managing the 
business, a full statement. It is even more obligatory upon those who 
contribute to the Lord's cause to see that the funds they contribute are 
faithfully and wisely handled. 

Last year the Baptists of North Carolina contributed to State Missions 
$47,931.91. The amount charged np to State Missions for expense was 
$3,423.16, which is 7% per cent of the amount contributed. For Home 
and Foreign Missions combined we received $71,226.47. The expense 
borne by these two was $3,404.91, or 4^ per cent of the total amount 
contributed for these objects. A little calculation will show that six per 
cent covers the expense of administration. The budget of expenses 
includes salaries and traveling expenses of the Corresponding Secretary 
of the Convention and Corresponding Secretary of Woman's work, 



12 Minutes of the 



salaries of Treasurer, Recording Secretaries, Auditor and stenographers, 
office rent, postage and printing. The salaries of the Recording Secre- 
tary and Auditor, and the printing and distribution of the Minutes do 
not belong to the work of administration, and. therefore, should not be 
charged to the expense of administration. If these were deducted it 
would bring the expense account down to about 5j^ per cent. That is, 
of every dollar contributed to missions only 55^ cents is used for expense, 
leaving 94}^ cents to go direct to mission work. 

In supporting the work of State Missious, we are reaching China, by 
way of North Carolina, and at the same time we are bringing a great 
blessing to our own beloved State. 

Committee, 

L. G. L. Taylor 
C. E. HiLi. 
I. S. Williams 
W. F. McMahan 
Talmage Wise 

The report was spoken to by Elders R. H. Herring, D. J. 
Hunt, L. G. L. Taylor and W. R. Bradshaw and subsequently 
adopted. 

Prof. B. H. Bridges, County Superintendnet of Schools, 
and Brother J. N. Dobbins, of the Sandy Run Association, 
were recognized and welcomed. 

Information was received that Walnut Grove no longer 
exists as a church organization, and the name is dropped 
from the roll. 

Adjourned for dinner. 

Benediction, Dr. R. T. Vann. 

AFTERNOON SESSION. 

The Association re-assembled in the house at 1:45 p. m. 

Prayer was offered by Elder D. P. Loudermilk. 

Elder Edward Long presented the 

REPORT ON HOME MISSIONS. 

Ours is a republic in which every man may worship God according to 
the dictates of his own conscience, but when our fathers founded this 
republic it was their earnest desire that it should become a Christian 
nation. As yet their wishes have not materialized, for out of the 



Green River Baptist Association. 



92,000,000 and more in our great country only about 21,000.000 or 20 per 
cent, are members of any evangelical church. Out of the 31,000,000 
people within the bounds of the Southern Baptist Convention, less than 
1 1.000,000 or about 33 per cent are members of any evangelical church. 
In spite of the persistent efforts of consecrated Christians during the past 
generations, there remains yet niuch pioneer work to be done. Scores 
of communities in many states do not hear the gospel message in its 
simplicity and purity. There has come about in addition a new kind of 
pioneer work. This is to be found in the slums of our cities and some- 
times on the fashionable boulevards. With the old tasks unfinished and 
many new and more difficult ones being added there comes a more 
clarion call to Home Missions. 

Not only are there new fields to be occupied but the old ones must be 
better cultivated. There are more than 11,000 churches within the 
bounds of the Southern Baptist Convention that are Missionary Baptist 
in name but not in spirit for they give not one cent to missions. Many 
of these have no houses for worship, many have no Sunday Schools, 
many have only once a month preaching by a non-resident pastor. It 
necessarily follows that these churches are not positive factors in the 
Southern Baptist Convention. To reach and aid in the development of 
these churches is distinctively Home Mission work and the Home Board 
has been wisely instructed to take hold of this work and push it with all 
possible speed. Dr. Arch. C. Cree, with his office in Atlanta, Ga., 
together with state helpers, has been put in charge of this work and is 
endeavoring to enlist this great host of inert Baptists in the real work of 
the kingdom. Could these churches be brought into their own by the 
enlistment and other forces there would be a new impetus given to the 
Southern Baptist Convention such as it has never known. 

Three thousand unhoused churches in our Convention territory, with 
thousands of others in buildings that are inadequate to their needs, 
mutely appeal to us for a large and hearty support to the Home Mission 
Board in raising the Million Dollar Church Building and Loan Fund. 

In the Southwest, in Cuba and Panama, among the districts through- 
out the South, among the Indians, Negroes and foreigners, through 
evangelism, church building work and enlistment endeavor, our Home 
Mission Board is today doing the greatest work of all its fruitful history. 

The past year has been a good one for the Home Mission Board. It 
came to the end of the year free from debt and with a small balance to 
its credit. The visible results have been very gratifying. The 1300 
missionaries, only eighteen of whom gave all their time to evangelism, 
baptized last year — both white and black — 27.000 candidates, organized 
201 churches, built or improved 234 church houses, organized 754 Sunday 



14 MlNUTKvS OF THK 



.Schools. The twenty-nine mountain mission schools, with 142 teachers 
and 4,646 students, 75 of whom are preparing for the ministry, made 
gratifying reports. 

"No mission board in the world" says one authority, "has reported 
results one half as large as these." No Home or Domestic Mission Board 
in America, so far as we can find, has had more than one-third as large 
results, through several boards have expended four times as much in the 
work. 

The average gift per member for the past few years for this great cause 
has been about fifteen cents per year. This average is low because there 
are about one and a half million members within the bounds of the 
Southern Baptist Convention who give nothing for missions. North 
Carolina had 304 churches that gave nothing to any object; 547 that gave 
nothing to Foreign Missions; 496 that gave nothing to State Missions; 
523 that gave nothing to the Orphanage and 600 that gave nothing to 
Home Missions. These 173,000 non-contributing members make the 
average for North Carolina frightfully low. 

Because of the rapidly increasing population of the Southwest, the 
tidal wave of immigrants that is just beginning to pour into the South, 
the rapid growth of the cities of the Southwest, the new and complex 
social conditions, and the influence of the rapidly increasing wealth of 
the South, we need to enlarge our contributions to Home Missions. 

The Home Board is asking this year from the Baptists of the South 
$431,750. North Carolina is asked for 3^32,500. Surely we will raise 
this and more. 

Our Association gave last year to this object only $287.28 or an average 
of about s}4 cents per member. Certainly ours is as liberal a people as 
is to be found within the bounds of the Southern Baptist Convention. 
Let us then more than double our contributions to this worthy cause 
which would only put us on a par with other Baptists in the Southern 
Convention. 

We recommend that each church accept as its pledge for 1913-1914 the 
amount apportioned for 1912-1913. 

For "Home Field" tracts, etc. address. Home Mission Board of South- 
ern Baptist Convention, 1002-1027 Third National Bank Building, Atlanta, 

Faithfully submitted, 

Edward Long 
D. C. Nanney 
s G. C. Dixon 

J. H. Parton 
R. M. Ci.ark 

The report was discussed at some length by Elder Edward 



Green River Baptist Associatioint. 15 

Long, and adopted — See pledges and apportionments — same 
as last year. 

In the absence of report on Woman's Work expected from 
Elder W. L. Haynes, it was ordered that the same be written 
and forwarded to the Clerk in time for its insertion in this 
edition of the Annual Minutes. 

Dr. Vanu, on motion, discussed the subject with great force. 

No special object being before the bod}^ Brother B. B. Price 
spoke of the Laymen's Movement and Systematic Benevolence. 

This subject will have a place on the program in 1914 — 
brethren W. T. Morgan and B. B, Price, were appointed to 
write the report. 

Additional messengers arriving to-da}^ were assigned to 
their respective homes. 

Adjourned to 9:30, a. m. tomorrow. 

Benediction — Elder W. L. Haynes. 

THIRD DAY— Morning Session. 

Saturday, October 4. 191 3. 

The Association re-assembed at 9:30 this morning. 

Elder L. G. L. Taylor conducted the devotional exercises, 
using the nineteenth Psalm, and leading the prayer. 

The Association was called to order by the Moderator. 

The Minutes of yesterday were read by the Clerk and 
adopted. 

The call for additional Associational letters and messengers 
by the Moderator had no response. When the call was ex- 
tended to visiting brethern from other Associations, and other 
agencies of the State and Southern Baptist Conventions, none 
answered. 

Elder A. P. Sorrels read report on 

SABBATH SCHOOLS. 

Sabbath School work in North Carolina compares favorably with other 
states in the union. 24.9 per cent of the population are in Sabbath 



1 6 Minutes of the 



School. No other state exceeds this, except Utah, which has compulsory 
attendance among the Mormons. 

In our state the Sabbath School enrollment is 64 per cent as large as 
the church membership. Among the Baptist it is 75 per cent. 

The conditions of the work are hopeful. 

We emphasize the field work being done by Bro. E. L. Middleton and 
urge our churches to avail themselves of his institute work as opportuni- 
ty may afford. 

Teacher training is a very important feature of this work. Let us train 
teachers better. We advise the churches to organize classes for the 
Normal Study Course. This work has proven a splendid success where 
tried. 

Annual Enlistment Day can be made a great help. A suitable pro- 
gram well prepared and rendered with enthusiasm increases the number 
enrolled and intensifies the interest of the school. 

Our Aim — A school in every church. Branch or mission schools at 
points not yet reached. Increased attendance. Thorough Bible study. 
Reasonable heartfelt Christianity among all the people. 

Committee, 

A. P. SORRKLS 

W. M. Nannky 
A. H. LoWKRY 
Z. V. Morris 

C. J. FI.ACK 

After remarks b}^ Elders A. P. Sorrels, D. J. Hunt and 
Brother R. P. Green, the report was adopted. 

Elder Z. T. Whiteside presented the report on 
MINISTERIAL EDUCATION. 

Round Hill has one ministerial student, Wake Forest has seventy five 
while the number at the Baptist Theological Seminary is not known. 
We believe in Ministerial Education of the most thorough kind. 

The Board of Education will loan its indigent young men preparing 
for the ministry the means to pursue their course of study, but requires 
them to pay back the loan after they have finished their studies. Some 
of our most useful ministers have obtained an education by borrowing 
from this Board. Each church should give something to help increase 
the fund placed in the hands of this Board at Wake Forest. 

Some of the students at the Theological Seminary at Louisville, Ky. 
need a contribution from us. to assist them in completing the prescribed 
studies. This Seminary is one of the largest and most thorough Theo- 
logical Schools in the world. We should all feel proud to be permitted 



Green River Baptist Association. 17 

to contribute to the fund at the Seminary which will enable our preachers 
there to finish their course at this school of the prophets. 

Committee, 

Z. T. Whitesides 
R. P. Geer 
J. C. McDaniel 
J. B. Lawing 
R. B. Clark 

The report was amended by substituting the words, will 
^^ive $Q per month for the words, will loan in paragraph two of 
the report given above. 

After discussion by Dr. R. T. Vann and Elder D. J. Hunt 
the report as amended was adopted. 

A collection of $15.12 was given to assist Miss Susan Jordan 
through College, and Miss Hoover, a prospective missionary 
to China, and placed in the hands of Dr. R. T. Vann. 

Elder R. H. Herring read recommendations of 

TRUSTEES OF ROUND HILL ACADEMY. 

Recommendations for Trustees of Round Hill Academy, whose terms 
expire in 1913: Elder A. E. Brown, Elder R. H. Herring, and brethren 
B. B. Price, J. L. Taylor, and W. T. Morgan. We re-elected W. F. 
Flack to fill vacancy made by the death of Brother A. T. Bridges, and 
Brother M. L. Justice to fill term of Judge M. H. Justice, resigned. 

Committee, 

R. H. Herring 
R. P. Geer 
Wm. M. Nanney 

Elder Herring also presented the report of J. D. Morris 
Secretar}^ and Treasurer of Round Hill Academy, which 
follows: 

TREASURER'S REPORT. 

STATISTICAL. 

Number of teachers employed 6 

Number of pupils enrolled 165 

Number graduating students 8 



1 8 Minutes of the 



FINANCIAL. 

CREDITS. 

By tuition collected $2,352.71 $ 

By rents 266.60 

By Ads. in Catalogue 16.00 

By pay entertainments 72.80 

By refreshments sold 17-95 

By Home Mission Board . . 500.00 3,226.06 

DEBITS. 

To teacher's salaries ..... 2,618.14 

To printing 140.27 

To traveling expenses 24.20 

To postage, stationery, etc 8.59 

To repairs i5-07 

To rents 94 00 

To collecting tuition 30.00 

To furnishings for dormitory 12360 

To individual expenses 133-59 

To balance debits 3860 $ 3,22606 

J. U. Morris, Secretary and Treasurer, 

Round Hill Academy. 

Both of the above reports were adopted without discussion. 

Prof ly. Q. Hayiies, Principal, read a statement outHning the 
character of the work being done at Round Hill Academy 
during the present session, which was very encouraging. 
This statement was either not filed or has been inadvertently 
mislaid. 

The Association now adjourned for the noon repast with 
benediction by Prof. I^. Q. Haynes. 

EVENING SESSION. 

The Association re-assembled at two o'clock and was led in 
prayer by Elder J. W. P. Hill. 

Elder F. B. Rankin of the Presb3^terian Church was tendered 
the usual courtesies of the body. Elder J. W. P. Hill and 
Brother Thomas Harris, of the Sandy Run Association w^ere 
also formally recognized. 



Grken River Baptist Association. 



The report of the Chairman of the Board of Trustees of 
Round Hill Academy follows, though presented later in the 
evening. 

REPORT OF TRUSTEES, ROUND HILL ACADEMY. 

The present Session of Round Hill Academy is beginning most 
auspiciously considering the circumstances. The enrollment has reached 
about loo. Our lack of suitable dormitories for the boys is a great 
handicap to our growth and success. This must be remedied speedily, 
or we suffer irreparable loss. The debt on the school building has 
been reduced very little the past year, and until this be removed, we 
cannot make the necessary improvements. Our new principal, Prof. 
L. O. Haynes, and the four lady teachers are fitting admirably into the 
situation, and the work is moving on nobly. The faculty is unsurpassed 
by any in a school of like grade in the State. 

Rev. D. J. Hunt, the former principal, has been secured by the 
Trustees to solicit and collect funds to pay off the debt. This matter 
must be adjusted, and we appeal most earnestly to the members of the 
Association to respond promptly and liberally to his call and meet this 
crisis in our School's history. ' 

R. H. Herring, Chairman. 

The report was adopted. 

Elder A. P. Sorrels submitted the following: 

DIGEST OF LETTERS. 

We find that the churches represented made gains in 132 points, and 
losses in 107 points. The number of gains exceed those of the losses 25 
points. 

20 Churches report gains in Pastor's Salaries. 



12 


" losses 


" " " 


16 


" gains 


" Sunday School 


17 


" losses 


' 


12 


" gains 


' Minute Funds. 


26 


" losses 


i a it 


18 


" gains 


to State Missions. 


13 


" losses 


" " 


16 


" gains ' 


' Home " 


15 


" losses 


' 


24 


gains 


' Foreign " 


10 


" losses ' 


i n a 


23 


" gains 


' Orphanage. 


15 • 


• ' losses ' 


' 



20 Minutes of the 



Some letters came in too late to be included in this report. Several 
churches report same as last year. 

Harmony Grove is the Banner Church on points gained— she having 
gained on every point. The Committee should be in possession of all 
the letters on or before the first day of the Association. 

Committee, 

A. P. Sorrels 
H. C. Marley 

The report was discussed by Elder A. P. Sorrels, and 
adopted. 

The Committee on Time, Place, and Introductory Sermon 
reported as follows by the Chairman: 

We, your Committee on Time, Place, and Introductory Sermon beg 
leave to submit the following: 

Time- -Thursday before first S'mday in Oct.. 1914. 
PivACE—Pleasant Hill Baptist Church. 
Introductory Sermon — Elder G. G. O'Neill. 

Committee, 

J. H. Raburn 
Sam D. Lewis 
Ray Aruedge 

A motion to amend the report by adding the name of Elder 
Edward Long as Alternate was carried. 

The report as amended was adopted. 

Elder H. C. Marley read 

REPORT ON TEMPERANCE. 

The progress in temperance reform has been great. The traflfic has 
been outlawed. The liquor politician has been put out of business, and 
dram drinking discouraged until the dram drinker is ashamed of his 
habit. Public sentiment is strong against the crime of selling liquor 
and the courts are prosecuting such criminals and sending them to the 
roads 

Step by step the people of North Carolina have come to know that the 
manufacture and the sale of licfuor is all evil in itself and popular opinion 
ripened to the extent that the entire traffic is prohibited by law, and 
the people are no longer helpless; not only public sentiment but the 
criminal law of the State has come to the relief of the suffering people. 

Liquor is sold to a limited extent by bHnd tigers, but if all the good 



Green River Baptist Association. 21 

people of the State will be active in their communities that can be easily 
stamped out. Every member of every church in this Association should 
see to it that no blind tiger shall ply the trade in his community. 

Our duty is plain. What we have gained in temperance has but 
revealed to us our own power and laid on us a peculiar obligatiou to 
press on. As Baptists we have had no mean part in bringing about this 
glad day. But our co-operative work is not at an end. We need to be 
alert to know our rights and knowing them to assert them, and having 
asserted them to dare maintain them. 

We commend our faithful preachers, our press, and Sunday School 
workers for their good work in temperance reform and we feel assured that 
they will continue the education of our people in practical temperance. 

We commend those newspapers in North Carolina that refuse to carry 
liquor advertisements. 

We favor a strong national law protecting prohibition territory from 
the interstate commerce in liquors. 

We most emphatically disapprove the policy of our national goverment 
in granting liquor license in prohibition territory, and declare it to be 
an unholy alliance with anarchy and a bold disregard of the plain rights 
of a sovereign people. 

We commend the North Carolina Anti-Saloon League as worthy of 
our continued moral and financial support. 

We commend to our people co-operative work, local and general to 
secure the best enforcement of the prohibition law of the State. 

And finally, there must be no letting up of the agitation and education 
on the individual, social and financial ruin caused by intoxicating liquors, 
to the end that upon our good foundation we may go on to the final 
overthrow of this arch enemy of the human race. 

Committee, 

H. C. Marley 
J. C. GUFFY 

F. P. Morgan 
D. L. ShiTle 

The report was spoken to by Elders H. C. Marley, G. G. 
O'Neill, Dr. R. T. Vannaiid Bro. W. E. Johnson, and adopted. 

On motion, it was further ordered that a telegram be sent 
to Senator James M. Cannon now representing the 33d North 
Carolina Senatorial District in legislative session, Raleigh, 
N. C, saying, That the Green River Association, now in 
session and composed of more than 5000 Baptists, protests 
against any change in our present claim and delivery laws 
regarding the shipment of spirituous liquors — Elder Edward 



22 Minutes of the 



I^ong to write, and Elder R. H. Herring to send the telegram 
this evening. 

After remarks by Elder Edward Long and Bro. R. P. Geer 
a collection was secured of $13.10 to supplement the minute 
fund sent tip by the churches. 

Elder D. P. Lowdermilk read report on 
AGED MINISTER'S RELIEF. 

The object of this Board, located at Durham, N. C. is to give aid and 
reHef to needy Baptist Ministers of North CaroHna, and their widows. 

There are four regular meetings of the Board each year on the fourth 
Wednesda}/ in February, May, August and November. 

We had on the Board last year 35 beneficiaries. The number this year 
is not known, but we do know there is great need along this hue. 

There is increasing liberality on the part of the churches to this Board, 
but still nearley three-fifths of the churches of the State give absolutely 
nothing to this object. More than one-fourth of the Associations of the 
State contribute nothing to this work, while a number of those con- 
tributing give almost nothing. Four of the Associations' not contribut- 
ing to the work, have beneficiaries on the Board. 

Will not some earnest pastor or layman, at each Association as it shall 
soon meet, champion the cause of our aged ministers and their families, 
and see to it that his Association not only gives but gives liberally ? 

Committee, 

D. P. LOUDERMILK 

W. L. Walker 
G. W. Geer 
W. L. Bland 
W. H. Taylor 

After remarks by Elder D. P. Loudermilk the report was 
adopted. Same basis as last year. See pledges and appor- 
tionments. 

Bro. B. B. Price submitted Report on 
STATE OF RELIGION. 

We are sorry to report that we find from the Church Letters sent up 
from the churches to the Association that there were 123 baptisms less 
than those reported a year ago, and 35 less received by letter than 
reported last year making a total loss in these two particulars of 158. 

We received only 208 by baptism and 121 by letter. We feel that there 
is a great lack of deep Spirituality among our people. We are convinced 



Green River Baptist Association. 23 

that the greatest need of the present hour is prayer, and that faith which 
takes hold of God; and a burning desire of heart, a yearning of soul for 
the salvation of the unsaved. 

We need the power of the Holy Spirit Let pastors and members of 
all the churches of this Associatiou earnestly plead for this power during 
this entire year, and we will see a different report from our churches at 
our next annual meeting. Some of our churches did not receive a single 
member during the past year. 

Committee, 

B. B. Price 

W. O. JUSICE 

The report was adopted with out discussion. 

Dr. R. T. Vann in response to a motion which was adopted, 
prayed earnestly for more consecrated life and work in the 
bounds of the Green River during the ensuing year than ever 
seen or felt before in all the years of our past history. 

A. L. Rucker submitted the following which was adopted 
without discussion: 

HISTORY. 

The two churches — Armstrong and Cooper's Gap, made no response to 
your request a year ago. It is suggested that this request be thrown 
open, to every church that has not heretofore written some historical 
sketch of its rise and progress as a part of the Green River Association. 

A . L. RUCKER, 

Historian. 

Bro. W. C. Raburn presented the report on 
NOMINATIONS TO STATE AND SOUTHERN BAPTIST CONVEN- 
TIONS. 

We recommend the election of the following delegates: 
To Baptist State Convention— Elders R. H. Herring and A. P. Sorrels. 
To Southern Baptist Convention — Elders Edward Long and D. J. Hunt. 

Committee, 

W. C. Raburn 
W. L. Bland 
John Owens 
W. A. Harrill 

Adopted. 



24 Minutes of the 



It was ordered, that the Treasurer pay the Clerk ten dollars 
for his services and that the balance of the Minute Fund be 
s])ent in the printing and distribution of the Minutes of the 
present session. 

On motion, the Moderator was authorized to appoint the 
chairmen of the several committees for the next session of the 
Association and forward same to Clerk in time for publication 
in this edition of the Minutes. 

After announcements by the committee on religious exercises 
for tomorrow, the Association adjourned to meet with the 
Baptist Church at Pleasant Hill on Thursday before first 
Sunday in October, 1914. 

Elder D. J. Hunt, 



Moderator. 



A. L. RrcKER, 

Clerk. 



FIFTH DAY. 

Sunday, October 5 191 3. 
The Association was reconvened bv the Moderator at 10:45 

A. M. 

Prayer was offered by Elder E. V. Hudson. 

Elder D. J. Hunt read a part of Nehemiah 8. 

The opening of Sunday School Mass Meeting was announced. 
The speakers were Elders D. J. Hunt and W. B. Green. 
Prayer, Elder D. J. Hunt leading. 

Dr. R. T. Vann read fourth chapter of second Corinthians 
and preached from II Corinthians 4:18 — "While we look not 
at the things which are seen; for the things which are seen are 
temporal; but the things which are not seen are eternal. 

At the close of the sermon a thank offering of $16.53 was 
secured for State Missions. 

Benediction, Dr. R. T. Vann. 



Grken River Baptist Association. 25 

The Association was called to order by the Moderator long 
enough to extend the usual vote of thanks to Mount Vernon 
church and vicinity for unbounded hospitalities extended to 
messengers and visitors present during the 73rd session now 
closing. 

AFTERNOON. 

After a song service consisting of duets, quartetts, anthems 
and hymns, both old and new and a prayer service in which 
Brother R. P. Geer, and Elders Z. T. Whiteside and G. G. 
O'Neal participated, the latter preached the closing sermon 
from Romans 11:36, "For of him, and through him, and to 
him, are all things to whom be glory for ever, amen." 
Closing song — "Bless be the tie that binds." 
Final prayer and benediction by Elder G. G. O'Neill. 

RECESS APPOINTMENTS, FOR 1914. 

The Chairmen of the Committees named will please prepare and have 
ready reports on the subjects named on the opening day of our next 
Annual Session: 

Laymen's Missionary Movement Bro. W. T, Morgan 

Christian Education Bro. M. P. Flack 

Round Hill School Elder R. H. Herring 

Thomasville Orphanage Elder J. W. P. Hill 

Old Ministers Relief Bro. A. W. Gilliam 

Ministerial Support Bro. B. B. Price 

Ministerial Education Bro. W. F. Flack 

State of Religion Bro. J. C. Ledbetter 

State Missions Elder A. P. Sorrels 

Home Missions Elder D. J. Hunt 

Foreign Missions Elder Edward Long 

Womans Work Elder R. H. Herring 

Temperance Elder G. G. O'Neill 

Digest of Letters Elder A. P. Sorrels 

F. O. Lewis 
J. L. Taylor 

Auditing Committee to examine Treasurer's Report last 
year, same this year, Brethren A. L. Grayson and T. C. 
Smith. 



26 



Minutes of the 



WOMAN'S MISSIONARY SOCIETIES. 



The Annual Meeting of Woman's Missionary Societ'es of 
the Green River Association met in the school building near 
Mt. Vernon on Thursday Oct. 2nd at 2 p. m. 

After scripture reading, our esteemed ex-vice president, 
Sister A. L. Grayson led in prayer and made an excellent talk 
on Going Forward. 

Mrs. R. H. Herring told how the Society in Rutherfordton 
had raised $35.00 in one week, and Mrs. P. C. Rollins told 
how the Society of the same church did not raise money for 
State Missions. 

The question of a separate time and place from that of the 
Association for our annual meeting was discussed and adopted 
— the following being agreed upon for our next annual meeting : 

Time — Friday and Saturday before first Sunday- in Septem- 
ber, 1914. 

Place — Round Hill Church at Union Mills. 

Mrs. A. L. Grayson having resigned, Miss Clara Morris 
was elected vice-president. 

A rising and unanimous vote of thanks was tendered Mrs. 
Gra3\son by the societies, for services rendered by her for 
many 3^ears past. 

Mrs. J. L. Taylor, Secretary. 

FINANCIAL EXHIBIT, WOMAN'S MISSIONARY SOCIETIES. 



SOCIETIES 



PRESIDENTS 



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Marion 

Sun Reams 

Mt. Vernon... 

Sun Beams 

Mt. Creek 

Round Hill 

Rutherfordton 
Sun Beams 

Totals 



Mrs. R. C. Nanney. 
Miss Maggie Hudgins 
Mrs. N. E. Wells ... 
Miss Georgia Logan 
Mrs. W. A. Warlick 
Miss Clara Morris... 
Mrs. J. L. Taylor .... 
Mrs. R. H. Herring 



$14.^5 
20.00 

7-25 

5.00 
10.00 
35-00 

5.00 



6.00 

7-77 
5.80 
2.30 

5 00 
10.00 
10.00 

1. 00 



'11-95 
12.00 

11.45 

125 

800 

10.00 

25 00 

1. 00 



5.80 
2 30 
4.00 
8.35 



I97. 10 $47 87 |8o 65 $20.45 f59 50 $305.57 



57.50 



32.80 
97.27 
30.20 

5.85 
22.00 

40.35 

70.00 

7.00 



Green River Baptist Association. 



PLEDGES AND APPORTIONMENTS. 



CHURCHES 



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Armstrong 

Bethel 

Bethlehem 

Beulah 

Big Level 

Bills Creek 

Camp Creek 

Cane Creek 

Chapel Hill 

Cherry Spring 

Clear Creek 

Columbus 

Coopers Gap 

Dysartsville 

East Marion 

Eureka 

Glenwood 

Hall Town 

Harmony Grove . 
Hickory Grove ... 

Jesse's Grove 

Macedonia 

Marion 

Mill Spring 

Montford's Cove. 

Mt. Creek 

Mt. Pleasant... 

Mt. View 

Mt. Vernon 

Pepper's Creek ... 

Piney Knob 

Pleasant Grove ... 

Pleasant Hill 

Rock Spring 

Round Hill 

Round Knob 

Rutherfordton 

Silver Creek 

Stone Mt 

Sunny Vale 

Turkey Cove 

Whiteside Valley 

Woodlawn 

Zion Hill 

Old Fort 



$ I.OO 


$ 300 


$ 


$ 2.00 


$ 


2.UO 


15.00 


1050 


20.00 


9.45 


2. GO 


7.00 




9 00 
3.00 




2. CO 


2. GO 


3.0G 


5.00 


2.70 


3.00 


3.65 


3 60 


9.00 


5.50 


I.OO 


3.OG 


3 30 


6.00 


4.40 


2.00 




l.IO 


3,00 


4.65 


2.00 


5.00 


5.0G 


5.00 


15.40 


2 GO 


10. GO 




9.00 


11.00 


2.00 


5. GO 


2.20 


5.00 


10.75 


2.00 


10.00 


12.90 


II. OG 


9.50 




1-25 

5.00 
5.00 
3.00 


1.25 

1.50 

4.40 


3.00 
7.00 
3.00 
8.00 


3.30 
350 

4.40 

l.IO 




I.OO 


I.OO 




3.OG 
I.OO 


8.00 
300 


7.70 
440 


6.0G 

3.00 


11.60 
2.20 


3.00 


9.00 


5-5> 


9.00 

5.00 


IG.GO 
1.25 


2.00 


2.00 


2.20 


6.00 


3.80 


ic .01 


90.00 

TO.OO 


70.75 
2.75 


80.00 


S5.5O 

2.75 
I / 0(J 


2.0< 


10.00 




17.00 


17.10 


20.00 


5.00 


20.00 


34.10 


40.00 


28.50 


I.OO 






1 .UO 




I .00 


2.50 


165 


4.<=o 


2.75 


5.00 


30.00 


26.25 


40. CO 


19.20 


I. GO 


"^.OO 


2.75 
3-75 


4 00 

6. GO 


2.20 


2.00 


5.00 


6.60 


2.00 


10.00 


5-50 
1. 10 


22.00 


5.50 
1.75 


I.OO 


5 50 


500 


5.00 
10.00 


40.00 
105,00 


27.50 
55.00 


40. i 
120.00 


14.50 

IIG.OO 


I.OO 


f .10 




3.00 


2.75 


I.OO 






I.OO 






2.0G 




2.00 


2.20 




I.OO 








2.00 


3.0G 


3.20 


4.00 


4.80 


I.OO 


2.00 






2.20 


I.OO 


2.00 


1.25 


2.00 


1.30 


5.0G 


25.00 


II. 10 


18,00 


22.25 


$88.00 


$474.00 


$328,30 


I53900 


$454.25 



6.00 

56.95 

j8.oo 

3. GO 
14.70 

24-75 
17.70 

10.75 
32.40 
32.00 
24.95 
45.40 

8.80 
17.00 
17.80 
13.10 
32.30 
13.60 
36.50 

6.25 

16.00 

347.25 
27.50 
68.10 

127.60 

2.00 

11.90 

120.45 

T2.95 

23.35 
45.00 

14.35 

I 27. GO 

400.00 
7.85 
2.00 
6.20 
I.OO 

17.00 

5.20 

7.55 

8r.35 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



CHURCHES 





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Armstrong 

Bethel 

Bethlehem 

Beulah 

Big Ivcvel 

Bills Creek 

Camp Creek 

Cane Creek.. . 

Chapel Hill. 

Cherry Spring 

Clear Creek 

Columbus 

Coopers Gap 

Dysartsville 

East Marion 

Eureka 

Glenwood 

Hall Town 

Harmony Grove . 
Hickory Grove ... 

Jesse's Grove 

Macedonia 

Marion... 

Mill Spring 

Montford's Cove. 

Mt. Creek 

Mt. Pleasant 

Mt. Vernon 

Mt. View^ 

Old Fort 

Pepper's Creek . . 
Piney Knob 



Pleasant Grove 

Pleasant Hill 

Rock Spring 

Round Hill 

Rutherfordton 

Stone Mt 

Sunny Vale 

Zion Hill 

Turkey Cove 

Whiteside Valley .. 

Woodlawn 

Sandy Run & Polk 

Co. S. S. Assoc 

Cash Collection at 
Association 



3.00 
4.00 



3.00 
2.50 

5.00 
3.00 

8.00 

1-35 
1. 00 
2.00 
5.00 



■50 

5.00 



4.00 

11.80 
1. 00 

2.50 



2.20 
5.00 
4.00 
4.00 
32.25 



1. 00 
2.68 
1. 00 



3.00 
4.00 



3.00 
2 50 

5.00 
1.45 

2.00 

1-35 
1. 00 
2.00 
5.00 



2.00 

4.00 

rS-oo 
1. 12 

1.50 



2.75 
4-15 
4.00 
3.00 
40.00 



1. 00 
2.23 



7.15 
16.28 



$ 2.0CJ 
3.00 
2.50 

5.00 
9.00 
3.00 



.50 
2.00 
5.00 



■50 
5.00 



30.00 



3-50 



4.00 
5.00 
4.00 
3.00 
8.00 



303 
5.00 



70 



8.00 
4.00 

2.70 

3-35 
3.00 



4.00 

• 50 
2.00 
5.00 



• 50 
6.10 



2.25 

370 

20.00 

2.50 



2.20 
6.00 
4.00 
3.00 
2.86 



2.70 

1. 00 
3.83 
319 



$1.00 

■75 



2.30 
1. 00 



2.10 
1-45 



1.03 
1. 00 



$1.00 
r.oo 
1-45 

1. ro 

1.20 

.50 

1-25 

1. 00 
1.70 

1-25 
1-25 

.60 

.82 

1. 00 

.40 

2. so 

.60 

J. 00 

1. 00 

1. 00 
2.50 



4-25 

2.35 

•50 

2.00 

1. 00 

.90 
1.70 

l.IO 

4.20 
4.00 

1. 00 

.65 

•75 

•50 

1. 00 



14.10 



Totals 116.78 136 48 106.03 •7096.38 15.63 65.12 1. 00 1,00 539.12 



4.00 
18.75 
15-95 

II. 10 

20.55 
11.50 

1.25 
12.00 

8.15 

1.25 

11.25 

730 
3.82 
9.00 

20.40 

2.50 

.60 

2.50 

17.10 

8.75 

2.50 

12.70 

81.05 
2.12 

2.35 

11.50 

2.00 

1315 

21.05 

18.40 

16.20 

90.76 

4.00 

1. 00 

570 

•65 

3-75 

1 3- 30 

II. 19 

7.15 
30.38 



Respectfully Submitted, 

W. A. Harrili,, Treasurer, Green River Association. 

We approve this report, 

A. L. Grayson, "I . ,.^. ^ 
T.C.Smith. ' [Auditing Committee 



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R. P. OEER & SON 

DRY GOODS, NOTIONS, SHOES, 
CLOTHING, HATS AND CAPS. 
LADIES COAT SUITS. See us 
before buying. 

R, P. GEER & SON, Rutherfordton, N. G. 

The Rutherford Hardware Go. 

Hardware of All Kinds 

Stoves, Builders Supplies, Carpenter's Tools, Engine Fix- 
tures, in fact everything usually kept in Hardware stores 

Agent for the Ford nnd other Automobiles and supplies, oil, gasoline, 
etc, etc, etc. Repairing promptly done, and fair treatment guaranteed 
to all 

C. W. KEETER, Proprietor. 

McDaniel-Saunders Co. 

Successors to R. P. Geer & Son 
RUTHERFORDTON, N. C. 

DRY GOODS, NOTIONS, SHOES and CLOTHING 

We sell McCall Patterns and Publications. 

Subscriptions Taken for McCail's Magazine, only 50c per year. 

The Commercial Bank 

RUTHERFORDTON, N. C. 

JOHN C. MILLS, President COLLETT L. MILLER. Cashier 

R. R. HAYNES, Vice-President JNO. G. NICHOLS. Assistant Cashier 

CAPIT4L .... $25,000.00 

SURPLUS . - - - 2.500.00 

DEPOSITS .... 120.000.00 

ASSETS .... 165,000.00 

COLLECTIONS RECEIVE OUR SPECIAL ATTENTION 

Inquiries Promptly Answered W C SOI IflT YOUR RTNINFSS 

4 Per Cent Paid on Certificates of Deposit ^ *- OULILII lUUK DUDIIMC^O 



MISS BESSIE F. JOHNSON. B. A. 

LATIN. HISTORY 

HISS HALLIE M. NEAL 

GRADUATEIH MUSIC 
PIANO. VOICE 



MISS EDNA PREVATTE 

GRADUATE IN CXPRESSION 
PRIMARY, EXPRESSION 
REV. D. J. HUNT 
FIELD AGENT 



L. Q. HAYNES, M. A. Principal. 
MISS BERTHA L. CARROLL, B. A. La Principal 

Union Mills, n. c. 



Under the Control of the Green River Association and 

the Home Mission Board of the Southern 

Baptist Convention. 

The aim of the school is to train the young^ men and youug 
women of this and nearby associations for active Christian life. 

The development of character is given primary attention. 

To this end the trustees have employed college graduates 
of high moral character and who are specialists in the courses 
they teach. They have the interest of your young men and 
young women at heart and spare no efforts to help them in 
all their work. 

The cost is very low. We know of no other .school that 
gives the same at such a low ccst, 

The spring term opens December 30, 1913. The fall term 
of 1 9 14 opens the third week in August. 

You will do well to invstigate. This is the place for the 
young men and young women of the Green River Association. 

For further information and a catalog, write to either of 
the above named principals. 



MINUTES 

OF THE 

SEVENTY-FOURTH ANNUAL SESSION 

OF THE 

Green River 
Baptist Association 

HELD WITH 

Pleasant Hill Baptist Church 

Rutherford Co., N. C. 

Octobe:r i. 2, 3 *Rud 4, A. D. 1914 



I 






Next Session the church at Chapel Hill, three 

miles South of ^ ' sinning on Thursday before the 

first Sunday in O V* e hope to get all trains to stop 
within one-half m 



R. P. GBER St CO. 

DRY GOODS, NOTIONS, SHOES, CLOTHING 

HATS, CAPS, AND LADIES COAT SUITS 

See us before buying 

R. P. GEER & SON, Rutherfordton, N. G. 

WILLIAMS-ERWIN GO. 

Main Street, Rutherfordton, N. G. 

STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES 

Flour, Grain, Meats, FeedstufFs, Fruits, Vegetables 
Confections, Etc., Etc. 

Everything fresh and guaranteed true to name. Country 
Produce bought, sold and exchanged. 

Try us whether you wish to buy or sell. Satisfaction assured. 

HARRILL BROTHERS 

DEALERS IN 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 
CARRIAGES, BUGGIES, HORSES AND MULES 

W. A. HARRILL, Manager 

RUTHERFORDTON, N. G. 



McDaniel-S Go. 

Successors to } 
RUTHERFO^ 

DRY GOODS, NOTIONS, CLOTHING 

We sell McCall Pat ; ons 

Subscriptions Taken for McCar 50c per year. 




MINUTES 

OF THE 

SEVENTY-FOURTH ANNUAL SESSION 

OF THE 

Green River 
Baptist Association 

HELD WITH 

Pleasant Hill Baptist Church 

Rutherford Co., IS. C. 

October 1, 2, 3 and 4, A. D. 1914 




Next Session will be held with the church at Chapel Hill, three 
miles South of Marion, N. C, beginning on Thursday before the 
first Sunday in October, 1915. We hope to get all trains to stop 
within one-half mile of place. 

LOFTIN a CO., PRINTERS, GASTONIA. N. C. 



OFFICERS 

Bro. B. B. Price, Moderator Marion, N. C. 

Rev. J. W. P. H11.T., Clerk Vein Mountain, N. C. 

Bro. W. a. Harrei.!,, Treasurer Rutherfordton, N. C. 



ORDAINED MINISTERS 

Arlege, J. B Saluda, N. C. 

Denton, J. R. ... ...... Dysartsville, N. C, 

Harris, B. B Dysartsville, N. C. 

Haynes, W. L. - Gilkey, N. C. 

Herring, R. H Rutherfordton, N. C. 

Hunt, D. J Cliffside, N. C. 

Hill, J. W. P . . Vein Mountain, N. C. 

Laughter, B. C Bob, N. C. 

Loudermilk, D. P. . . . . . Marion, N. C. 

McHahan, W. F Sunny Vale, N. C. 

Moore, Wm. H Marion, N. C. 

Mashburn, A. B Nealsville, N. C. 

McDaniel, T. C . . . Cliffside, N. C. 

Sorrels, A. P ' ' . . . ',: . f . ; ', . Nebo, N. C. 

Taylor, L. G. L . . . . . . ". . . Union Mills, N. C. 

Weaver, G. H Nebo, N. C. 

Whitesides, Z. T Uree, N. C. 

LICENTIATES 

Sorrels, Clyde C Nebo, N. C. 

Simmons, Fletcher Nebo, N. C. 



Delegates 

The following list is the Delegation of the Association, but 
all were not present: 

Armstrong— By Letter. 

Bethei. — W. C. Raburn, F. P. Morgan, J. H. Morris. 

Bethi.ehem — I. S. Reel, James N. Gibson, and A. W. GilHan. 

Beulah — W. B. Chapman, WilHam Pack. 

Big Levei^— W. J. Wilson, Henry S. Smith, John Skiper. 

Bii.i.'s Creek— F. h. Flinn, W. C. Dalton, J. C. McDaniel, T. E. 
Flinn. 

Clear Creek — G. B. Woody, R. C. Burgin, Andy Mason. 

Camp Creek — A. Morehead, J. B. Condrey, Zeb Clements. 

Cane Creek— B. F. Jones, C. W. Searsy, J. A. Nelson, J. P. Wilson, 
J. P. Harris. 

Chapel Hill— B. G. Hensley, C. E Huffman, B. F. Corpening. 

Cherry Springs — Clarance Gilliam, William Silliam, Peter Vess. 

Columbus— J. L. Gilbert, H. W. Hill, L. L. Tallant. 

Cooper's Gap— T. N. Wilson, J. W. Biddy, C. B. Gibbs, Twitty 
Jackson. 

Dysartsville — L. G. Price, W. N. Laughridge, Z. V. Danes, W. H. 
Taylor. 

East Marion— G. C. Dixon, C. C. Barrs, V. Kendrick. 

Eureka— G. W. Whithside. 

Glenwood — A. P. Poteat, J. A. Bird. 

Green Hill — J. P. Jones, J. N. Jones. 

Hickory Grove— J. C. Stott, F. Pitman, A. T. Pitman, G. P. Green. 

Harmony Grove— J. F. Davis, C. F. Tyson, W. L. Lawing, E. S. 
Brown. 

Macedonia— S. F. Rhom, I. T. Wise. 

Marion— Rev. Wra. H. Moore, N. C. Jones, B. B. Price, A. R. 
Buffaloe, B. P. Davis. 

Mill Spring— F. Jackson, Wm. Splawn, N. B. Jackson, J. J. 
Lambright. 

Mount View— N, C. Burgess, D. C. Halford. 

Montfords Cove— J. W. Halford, E. S. Harris, L. M. Stott, F. V. 
Harris, C. A. Nichols. 

Mount Creek— J. I. Cash, J. S. Hampton, D. N. Grier, Coran 
Bridges. 

Mount Pleasant— W. E. Hudgins, B. B. Sercy, E. W. Hill. 

Mount Vernon— Z. V. Freeman, Wm. Bow, W. B. Wilson, G. H. 
Padgett, J. T. Lewis, R. H. Carswell, W. P. Crowder. 



Minutes of the 



Nebo— Rev. A. p. Sorrels, G. D. Taylor, J. L. Padgett. 

Old Fort— J. S. Bradley, Mrs. J. S. Bradley, Grady Gilbert. 

Pleasant Grove— W. N. Spangler, W. L. Bland, R. Ledbetter. 

Pea Ridge— V. B. Hyder, W. h. Gibbs. 

Pleasant Hill — D. D. Nanney, John Sane, C. C. Lovelace, J. 
Whitesides, John Mathis. 

Piedmont— W. R. White, J. L. Hodge, C. W. Hodge. 

Rock Spring— W. D. Williams, M. H. Whitesides. 

Round Hill— J. D. Morris, G. W. Morgan, F. J. Mauney, W. 
Barnes, W. R. Mauney, J. C. Alley. 

RuTHERFORDTON — J. L. Taylor, A. R. Yelton, R. P. Scruggs, H. 
Morgan, W. A. Harrill. 

Sunny Vale— W. D. McMahan, M. J. Padgett, T. J. Elliott. 

Silver Creek— E. A. Arledge, C. Arledge, W. J. Green. 

Whiteside Valley— Z. V. Taylor, C. H. Ruppe. 

WOODLAWN— D. R. Byrd, W. V. Wollifield. 

ZiON Hill— J. M. Pendergrass, H. J. Gasaway. 



Green River Baptist Association 



PROCEEDINGS 



Pleasant Hill Baptist Church, 
Rutherford County, N. C, Thursday, Oct. i, 19 14. 

The Sevent3'-fourth Animal Session of the Green River 
Baptist Association convened with this church at 11:00 this 
morning. 

Services began by singing "All Hail the Power of Jesus' 
Name." Praver was offered by Elder Wm. H. Moore. 

Rev. R. H. Herring introduces the ist Rev. W. F. Sinclair, 
pastor of Pleasant Hill and Piedmont Churches. 2nd, Wm. 
H. Moore, pastor of Marion Church. 

Elder G. G. O'Neill read Isa. 40. Prayer by Rev. A. P. 
Sorrels. Sermon by Rev. G. G. O'Neill. Text, Psalms 62:5 
"My Soul Wait Though only upon God, for my Expectation 
is from Him." 

On motion by Rev. R. H. Herring, B. B. Price was elected 
Moderator temporary. 

Letters deposited with Committee on Digest of Letters: 
A. P. Sorrels, F. O. Lewis, J. L. Taylor. 

Bro. W. M. Green was recognized for Recorder. Rev. A. 
W. McDanielof Bakersville was welcomed into the Association. 

In absence of Rev. Livingston Johnston, is elected to speak 
on State Missions this afternoon. 

Bro. W. M. Green is appointed to write report on Recorder. 

Address by Elder W. F. Sinclair. 

Adjourn to meet at 1:30 p. m. 

Elder R. H. Herring dismissing. 



Minutes of the 



THURSDAY— Afternoon Session. 

The Association met agreeable to adjournment, prayer being 
oifered by Elder A. W. McDaniel. 

Partial report of Committee on Digest of Letters to see if 
a quorum was present. 

Rev. R. H. Herring nominated Bro. B. B Price for 
Moderator, remarks by Bro. Price after which be was 
unanimously elected. 

Elder J. W. P. Hill was elected Clerk. 

Bro. W. A. Harrill was re-elected Treasurer. New churches 
called for, received four: Piedmont, Pea Ridge, Green Hill 
and Nebo. 

By motion the Moderator is to appoint all Committees. 

Committee on Order of Business: Rev. R. H. Herring, 
Rev. M. B. Hamrick, Bro. Richard Ledbetter. 

As the Association did not follow report we will omit it. 

Report on Biblical Recorder by Bro. W. M. Green. 

REPORT ON THE BIBLICAL RECORDER. 

The BibHcal Recorder is eighty years old. It has been so closely 
associated through all these years with every object of our Convention, 
that a history of our denomination in N. C, would contain very largely 
a history of the Biblical Recorder. For it has been a loyal supporter of 
every great achievement made by the Baptists of our State. 

And never in the past has it been more eflficient than it is to-dav. We 
are indeed fortunate in having for our editor Rev. Hight C. Moore, 
whom Dr. J. B. Gambrell of Texas declares "Is one of the softest and 
best editors in all the South." 

As its name implies it is distinctively Biblical and stands for the great 
doctrines of Salvation as taught in the Bible. 

We need the Recorder in our home because it brings us each week in- 
formation about the work of our denomination, gives us impulses for 
good, adds interest and enthusiasm to our religious life, sets up the 
Christian ideal in the home, helps in the development of the local 
church, and unites us as a denomination. 

It is the pastor's assistant and goes into the homes each week and 
stands for the same things the pastor stands for and has for its aim the 
ultimate evangelization of the whole world. 



Green River Baptist Association 



The Committee urges the pastors of this Association to help extend its 
circulation within its bounds. 

W. M. Green 
N. C. Jones 
J. D. Morris 

On motion to adopt, this report was discussed by Elders B. 
M. Hamrick, J. D. Moore, R. H. Herring and Brothers B. B. 
Price and W. M. Green, and adopted. 

State Missions Report read by Elder A. P. Sorrels: 

REPORT ON STATE HISSIONS. 

Jesus said, "Follow Me." This command applies to preaching the 
Gospel in our own State. 

The State Mission Board is organized to aid in both country and 
towns, in establishing and developing churches. 

When the Convention was organized and the work of State Missions 
was begun, we had no towns of any considerable size. Our strength 
was out in the country. This was the state of affairs after the war. In 
those days the country church was the center of the community life. 
The country pastor lived among his people. He was, as a rule, the best 
informed man in the community and was the social, intellectual and 
religious leader of his people. 

The weakest point in the country churches of the olden time was that 
they didn't know the grace of giving. The pastor was not dependent 
upon them for a support. But here, until this present day, is the fatal 
weakness of our country churches. 

The countr}' pastor of the olden time is gone, many of the churches 
that were strong numerically and financially have been weakened by the 
removal of a large percentage of their membership to some nearby 
town. As a consequence some of them are unable to have preaching if 
the support of the pastor depends upon the membership. 

Shall we allow these churches to die ? The policy of the Mission 
Board is to aid churches until they gain sufficient financial strength to 
stand alone, but it will not do to make that an invariable rule. 

It may be necessary to extend aid to some churches, with out hope 
that they will ever make large financial returns to the denomination. 

DIFFICULTIES IN THE WAY OF DEVELOPMENT. 

1. The chief obstacle is getting the churches to form compact fields. 

2. Another hindrance is once — a — month preaching. 

3. It is difficult to secure strong, well-equipped men for country fields. 



Minutes of the 



An earnest effort should be made to form compact fields. The State 
Boiird can be of service, too, by aiding, as a demonstration of what can 
be done. 

People who move from country to town find themselves in an alto- 
gether different invironment. Fresh from the old country church with 
its simple, and to them, — and soul-full worship, they do not feel at home 
in the town church with its more stately and elaborate forms of worship. 

In every growing town there are suburban residental sections. It is in 
the suburbs of our growing towns and cities; the State Mission Board is 
doing its chief v^'ork to-da3^ 

There are more cotton mill towns in North Carolina than in any other 
State in the Union, except Massachusetts. Most mill owners take a 
genuine interest in the welfare of their operatives, and, on the other 
hand, most operatives appreciate this interest on the part of the em- 
ployers. A wise missionary can do much to strengthen this relation, 
and such a missionary will find the mill owners, with very rare ex- 
ceptions, ready and willing to co operate with him in everything looking 
to the uplift of the community. 

Unconverted people do not attend evangelistic meetings in the week. 
How to reach the very ones for whose benefit these meetings are held is 
a vital question. Business and pleasure are the chief obstacles in the 
way of church attendance in the week. 

There are many things that cannot be expressed in cold type. The 
most important results of State Mission work are Spiritual, and cannot 
be tabulated. Not until the accounts are all in, and the books of Heaven 
are opened, can we know all that God has accomplished through the 
Agency of State Missions. 

There are in the State two thousand churches. At least half of them 
have been organized by missionaries of the Board. In some sections of 
the State there are too many churches. In these sections consolidation 
is needed far more than multiplication of organizations. It has always 
been the policy of the Board not to establish a church where one is not 
needed. The greater eflaciency of these mission churches is due, also, to 
their training. A printed form i.s furnished by the Board, upon which 
application must be made when aid is desired. Certain conditions are 
stipulated, which must be agreed to by the church in conference. The 
church must promise to pay a definite amount for the support of a pastor, 
and to take collections regularly for the objects of the Convention. The 
missionaries are required to make full reports at the end of each quarter, 
of sermons preached, number baptized, and money contributed during 
the quarter. In this way the churches are trained in systematic, 
regular and symmetrical benevolence. 

A. P. SORRETvS, 

For Committee. 



Green River Baptist Association 



After discussion by Rev. Wm. H. Moore, Elder G. G. 
O'Neill, on motion 5 minutes was extended to Rev. A. P. 
Sorrels to explain report, it was adopted, with the amendment 
made by Rev. R. H. Herring to raise State Missions 10 per 
cent over last year, (see table,) and that all Sunday Schools 
take a collection for State Missions on or as near the 3rd 
Sunday in October as can be handy arranged. 

Assigning Delegates to their homes. 

The Treasurer asked for all that had any money, to hand it 
over to him so he could make his report. 

Prayer by J. M. Moore. 

Adjourned to meet in the morning at 9:30 o'clock. 

FRIDAY — Morning Session. 

Association re-opened b}^ singing. Devotional exercise by 
Rev. A. W. McDaniel, scripture reading: John 14:21 "He 
that hath my Commandments and keepeth them he it is that 
loveth me shall be loved of my Father and I will love him 
and will manifest myself to him." 

Report of Clerk for Thursday was adopted. 

Report on Orphanage read by Elder J. W. P. Hill, and 
discussed by reader, Bro. Archibald Johnson and Rev. R. H. 
Herring, then adopted. 

ORPHANAGE REPORT. 

The care of the unfortunate is a natural and fundamental expression 
of Christianity. Jesus was in his ministry what he would have us be. 
He emphasized things fundamental and cast the program for all ages. 
He glorified childhood and so related his Gospel to the physical wants 
of life that we cannot hope to save the soul unless we also provide for 
the body. 

So far Orphanage work has been the principal form of our benevolence, 
largely because it has been showing the most tangible results. It has 
been said by some that it is necessary only to let the people know the 
needs of the Orphanage and they will be supplied. The coming year 
will show whether this is true or not. With only four hundred and 
thirty children we have fallen behind. 



lo Minutes of the 



Children are already being received at the Kennedy Home. Within 
a short time there will be more than fifty children there. The Miles 
Durham nursery for very shall children, at Thomasville, will be com- 
pleted before the winter months. If this is filled with children and we 
provide for those that are being received at the Kennedy Home, the 
current expenses must be increased lio.ooo over last year. It means 
that we must increase our contribution to this most worthy and needy 
cause at least 25 per cent. Will this Association not go on record 
favoring this additional increase ? 

Among North Carolina Baptist nothing has so enlisted men and women 
in the work of the Kingdom as the Orphanage work. It has been the 
agenc}' for the promotion of harmony, liberalit3' and consecration. 
Thus the larger work of the kingdom the little child is the leader. 

Since the reception of the first child,. Nov. 2, 1885, 15 16 have been 
enrolled and the present number is 430 (with about 500 by end of this 
year.) Average cost per child $107.64 a year. The health record of the 
children for the past year has been remarkable, there being no deaths 
and few cases of serious illness. 

Large and valuable additions are being made to the plant at Thomas- 
ville. A modern dairy barn has been completed. This department of 
our work along the various other industrial features are to be em- 
phasized. A splendid auditorium will be completed within a year. 
The erection of this important and greatly needed building was made 
possible by the bequest of the late Dr. S. W. Little of Davie County, 
whose honored name it will bear Three new school rooms have been 
added with improvements on the old school building. A tenth grade 
has been put in the school course for the purpose of giving those who 
leave us a better preparation for life's struggles. 

We would again urge and recommend: (i) That every Sunday 
School set aside one Sunday in each month as Orphanage day. (2) 
A club of Charity and Children in each Sunday School and an in- 
dividual copy to pastors and all homes that are not represented in the 
Sunday School. (3) A liberal Thanksgiving offering and the im- 
portance of a special WORK DAY, giving not less than one day's work 
to the Orphanage. We would suggest that a numV^er of the Churches of 
the Green River Association could better select a certain Sunday of each 
year for special service to the Orphanage. 

Finally brethren let us constantly keep in mind the appeal of the 
LARGER ORPHANAGE and remember as we save the child we do not 
only save the State but we save ourselves and in doing this we find our 
greatest happiness. 

Committee, 

J. W. P. HiLi. 
C. S. Brown 
W. C. Raburn 



Green River Baptist Association it 

Called for letters and welcomed all new Delegates. 
Bro. W. F. Flack was not present and report on Education 
was not read. 

On request Bro. J. D. Morris read the Treasurer's report of 
Round Hill School which was adopted. 

TREASURER'S REPORT. 

Report of J. D. Morris, Secretary and Treasurer of Round Hill 
Academy, for the school year ending May 6th, 1914. 

Number of teachers employed 5 

Number of students enrolled 127 

Number of graduates 6 

Total number of graduates from this school is 55 

FINANCIAL. 

CREDITS. 

By teachers salaries paid $2,562.50 $ 

Printing Catalogues 41.20 

Repairs 43 00 

Interest on school note . ... 1548 

House rent 72.00 

Incidental expenses , 279.98 

Total I3.014.16 

DEBITS. 

To tuition collected 11,833.50 

Back tuition collected 68.14 

Pay entertainments and refreshments 67.40 

Rents received 239.31 

Home Misjjion Board 500.00 

Advertising in Catalogue , 14.75 

Total $2,723.10 

To balance due 291.06 

Total 13,014.16 

Rev. R. H. Herring read report on Round Hill School. 

REPORT ON ROUND HILL ACADEHY. 

Round Hill Academy was organized by the Round Hill Church in 
1899, later it became the property of ttie Green River Association and is 
held and administered by a Board of Trustees, elected by this body, in 



12 Minutes of the 



connection with and under the supervision of the Home Mission Board 
of the Southern Baptist Convention, which has contributed generously 
to the equipment and running expenses. 

In the fifteen years of its existence its property has increased to the 
value of about ;^i8,ooo.oo, an increase of over a thousand dollars a year. 
The property consists of three buildings, a large two-story administration 
building, a dormitory for young men and one for young women. It has 
been necessary to rent another building for a dormitory for young women. 

The new dormitory for boys replaces the old make shift building, 
which had become so uncomfortable and delapidated as to render its 
further use impossible. Our young men were turning away from the 
school on account of the lack of a place to live, and the very life of the 
institution was imperiled forcing the management to build, in which 
enterprise the Home Board jointly engaged, assuming one half of the 
expense. 

This building, just completed, will accomodate about forty boys, and 
is a model of convenience, and will be the pride of the school and an 
untold blessing. 

Before undertaking to build it was necessarv to arrange for the old 
debt on the administration building. This was done, as far a*; possible, 
in a most diligent campaign last March, which resulted in cash and 
notes sufficient to cover all except about $500.00 and in the building 
of the dormitory it has been necessary to incur additional indebtedness 
to the amount of about $1500.00, leaving a total of $2000.00 not provided 
for. It is practically assured that the Round Hill and Rutherfordton 
Churches will take care of, at least, one half of this amount and it is 
most earnestly urged that some plan of action be decided upon at this 
session of the Association, to get this matter presented to the churches 
directly and the whole sum be paid during the coming year. 

The school, under the most able management, of Prof. L. Q. Hayues 
and the four splendid young women who are associated with him in 
teaching, is going grandly on its mission of Christian Education. The 
enrollment to date is eighty. Forty-two 3'oung ladies and thirty-eight 
young men. Under the circumstances this is a fine showing, for nearly 
all the students are in the high school department. The primary de- 
department has been dispensed with as it was found not to be self 
supporting and undesirable on account of irregularity of attendance and 
other existing conditions. 

The deportment of the student body is the very best and tnoral and 
religious influences over the young men and women are strong. 

This year the school has added a course of Home Economics and 
gives instruction in house work including cooking, sanitation, cleaning, 
sewing, decoration of the home and various other branches of house 
work. 



Green River Baptist Association 13 

The greatest need now is a common dining hall, which should be 
built as an annex to the young ladies' dormitory. This dormitory also 
needs to be remodeled. This would not cost much and will be practically 
all the building equipment the school needs now. 

A generous friend of the school, living at Union Mills, has promised 
to will frooo.oo to the endowment fund of the school as soon as the debt 
is paid. The Home Board will supplement this gift. Every dollar you 
give means two more will be given. 

When you consider the work being done, can you make a more telling 
investment for the kingdom? 

Rev. R. H. Herring, 

Chairman of Board of Trustees. 

After discussion by Elder R. H. Herring, Bros. Archibald 
Johnson, and L. Q. Haynes, the report was adopted. Bro. 
Haynes submitted the following Summary of Round Hill 
School. 

SUMMARY. 

Round Hill Academy was organized by the Round Hill Church in 
1899, and came under the supervision of the Home Board in 1900 being 
one of the first two in North Carolina to become a part of the school 
system of Southern Baptists, 

During the fifteen years of its existence its property has increased to 
the value of about $18,000, an increase of over a thousand dollars a 
yeaf . The school owns three buildings, a large two-story administration 
bnilding, a dormitory for young men, and one for young ladies. It is 
necessary to rent another building to serve as a dormitory for young 
ladies. There is a debt of about two thousand dollars on the school, 
incurred by the erection of the new dormitory for young men, which 
must be paid this year. 

The school has graduated fifty-four young men and women who are in 
the following professions: 

Physicians i 

Journalists i 

R. R. Superintendents i 

U. S. Navy i 

House Mistresses 9 

Now in College ...'•. 9 

Ministers 4 

Teachers 27 

Stenographers i 

The school has this year added a course of Home Economics to the 



14 Minutes of the 



work and gives instruction in house-work including cooking, sanitation, 
cleaning, serving, decoration of the home, and various other branches 
of house- work. 

Besides giving instruction in the regular literary course, the following 
branches are taught; Bible, Sunday School Pedagogy, Home Economics, 
and Agriculture. Christian education is our aim. 

A generous friend of the school, living in our village, has promised to 
give $1000 to the endowment fund of the school as soon as the debt is 
paid. The Home Board will supplement this gift. Every dollar you 
give means that two more will be given. A dollar invested in our school 
counts for more than many dollars invested in anything else. / 

Rev. R. H. Herring offered the following resolution: 

That the Delegates put themselves on record as to a move- 
ment directed b}^ the Trustees of Round Hill Academy to 
carry before the churches of this Association the debt of 
$2000, one-half of which Round Hill and Rutherfordton 
Churches are expected to pay and ask them to provide for 
the payment of the other $1000 in one or two years. 

Bro. L. Q. Haynes and Archibald Johnson made excellent 
talks on Christian Education. 

On motion Elder A. W. McDaniel was asked to read the 
report on Home Missions wrote by Rev. D. J. Hunt. 

Congregation was dismissed by Rev. W. Sinclair for one 
hour. 

FRIDAY— Afternoon Session. 

1:30 o'clock Association re-assembled in the house. 

Prayer by Elder J. W. Walker. 

Report on New Churches by Wm. H. Moore. 

REPORT ON NEW CHURCHES. 

The Committee on the admission of New Churches into the Green 
River Association recommend that the Nebo, Pea Ridge, Green Hill and 
Piedmont Churches be admitted to membership in the Green River 
Association according to their application. 

Wm. H. Moore 
G. G. O'Neili. 
J. L. Taylor 



Green River Baptist Association 15 

Report adopted, and the Delegates of the New Churches 
made welcome to seats among us. 

Elder A. W. McDaniel read report on Home Missions. 

REPORT ON HOME MISSIONS. 

Great and marvelous is the work God is doing through our Home 
Mission Board. 

The supreme work of this Board is to save the home land. 

Its function is to vigilantly observe the changing conditions and take 
the initiative in the solution of its great problems as they relate to our 
Baptist obligation and the coming of Christ's Kingdom on earth. The 
Board is a chosen Committee of men who should be wise in head and 
warm in heart. 

Whatever special form the work of this Board may have assumed, it 
has two key words which have dominated all its plans and policies. 
The first of these is EVANGELIZATION. The Home Board has been 
in all its history a soul-saving agency. More than 30,000 baptisms were 
reported by missionaries supported wholly or in part by our Home 
Mission Board, and more than 56,000 additions to Baptist churches. 
The past is glorious but larger tasks confront us. 

Of the 30,000,000 people in the Southern Baptist Convention to-day, 
22.000,000 are not Christians. Evangelistic effort is more successful in 
Southern Baptist territory than in any other part of the country but it is 
steadily becoming more difficult in our territory to win people to Christ 
or to hold those who have been won to lives of service without a 
program for training and strengthening the life which has been im- 
planted. True religion is attacked, they propose a religion or a closed 
Bible, as Roman Catholics do, or mutilated, as Christian Science, 
Russellism, and other destructive false faiths. 

The South is the last great stronghold and hope of the religion of the 
open Bible, and both from their peculiar doctrines and their numbers 
Baptists have the greatest opportunity and obligation to hold this great 
section for Jesus Christ and make it a center from which shall go out 
mighty forces of world redemption. The thought of Hamilton is 
applicable, "It is ours to be either the grave in which the hopes of the 
world shall be entombed, or the pillar of cloud that shall pilot the race 
onward." Which shall it be ? We have much to encourage us. 

The other key word is ORGANIZATION. Men and women must not 
only be saved, but they must be oaganized into a great working force for 
the saving of other men and women. Among Baptist people the 
evangelization has proceeded faster than compact effective organization. 
But this Board has done much to carry the purpose of the Southern 
Baptist Convention in its aim to "elicit, combine, and direct" the 



1 6 Minutes of the 



energies of the denomination. One of the most important factors the 
Board is now fostering in this line is its system of mission schools in our 
mountain section. By this means we are bringing into the active 
organized work of the denomination a large and most effective Baptist 
population which has hitherto been latent. Last year we had thirty- 
two schools and employed 156 teachers, enrolled 5,280 students, seventy- 
eight of whom were ministerial students; 300 conversions were reported 
among the students. The cost of teaching alone, not including ether 
expenses, was $62,035, of this amount the Home Board paid $19,500. 
Improvements cost $47,936; of this amount tlie Home Board paid, 
$14,761. This Board has been a God send to our own Round Hill. 
Without Its help we could but have failed. The Board is helping us in 
gifts amounting to more than $2,000 this year. If others think our 
children worth educating do we not concur in their opinion ? 

The work in the Southern States, among the negroes and the Indians 
and the Foreigners; in Cuba and in the Canal Zone is being pushed by 
our Board. 

The Department of Enlistment has served its first year with great 
success. Its distinctive mission is to the 10,000 non-co-operating and 
non-participating Baptist Churches in the South, and to more than 
3,000 barely participating and poorly co-operating churches. It has an 
important mission to thousands of co-operating churches where a 
majority of the members have no part in the missionary work. 

We have abundant reason to be encouraged. The growth in the last 
eleven years is convincing. Our receipts in 1904 were $127,850.56. In 
1914, I397.850. T2; Baptisms then, 8,017; this year, 30,861; total additions 
then, 17,288: this year, 56,747; then we had no Church Building Loan 
Fund, now we have launched our Million-Dollar Loan F'und. 

Our work is making rapid progress along all lines and to accomplish 
the task set before us let adopt the following policy laid down by our 
Board, They recommend: 

1. That our churches be encouraged to make a larger use of the 
splendid free Home Mission tracts issued by the Home Board, and to 
form study classes in the Board's new book, "Baptist Home Missions." 

2. That clubs of subscribers be gotten in the churches for THE 
HOME FIELD. It is an exceedingly distressing and unworthy situation 
that only one Baptist preacher in five in the South gets this magazine. 

3. We recommend that prayer be made in our chnrches for this great 
cause and for the saving and holding of the South for our Lord Jesus 
Christ, and that preachers be requested to preach frequently on Home 
Mission subjects. 

4. That in order to make effective and definite the obligations of the 
individual churches to take their full share of Home Mission work, 
this Association assume $425.00 as its share of the State apportionment, 



Green River Baptist Association 



and that the Executive Committee be authorized to apportion this 

amount fairly among the churches. 

Committee, 

D. J. Hunt 

A. W. McDaniel 

A. L. RUCKER 

J. L. Taylor 
This report was spoken to by Elder A. W. McDaniel, Rev. 
J. W. P. Hill and Bro. Archibald Johnson, and adopted. 

On motion business was waived and Elder J. W. Walker 
read report on Sunday Schools. 

REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS. 

We beUeve that our churches have not taken the interest in Sunday 
School Missions that they should. This work is not new. Since 1835 
Sunday School Agents or Secretaries have from time to time worked 
under instruction from the Convention. Since 1870 the following have 
served as Secretaries: N. B. Cobb, G. W, Green, John E. Ray, M. L. 
Kesler, B. W. Spillman, N. T. Johnson, Hight C. Moore, E. L. 
Middleton. . A part of this time this work was maintained entirely from 
State Mission funds. Since 1908 the Sunday School Mission fund has 
paid its own expenses with the help of the Sunday School Board at 
Nashville. God has blessed the enterprise. It has grown very rapidly. 
The number of Schools has greatly increased, the enrollment is growing 
also. We have 25,000 more people in our schools than any other state 
in the Southern Baptist Convention. 

To carry on this great work, we feel the need to greatly increase our 
contributions. 

We should have a vigorous campaign to interest more of our church 
members. There are about 250,000 Baptist in the State and only about 
85,000 are in Sunday School leaving 165,000 outside the schools. 

The attendance is very irregular. If 60 per cent is the average attend- 
ance, we have only about 50,000 members in regular attendance, or 
24 per cent of our membership to interest this 200,000 is a great task. 

Some recommendations: 

1. Let the pastors make freqent and earnest appeals to the members 
to attend. 

2. Let us have some special day, say Rally Day with appropriate 
program. 

3. Have organized classes where effective, 

4. Organize normal classes for the teachers. 

John M. Wai^ker 
John S. Bradley 
John M. Pendergrass 



Minutes of the 



After stirring talks by Elders J. W. Walker, R. H. 
Herring, A. W. McDaniel and Brethren B. B. Price, John 
Saine, J. P. Hyder, the report was adopted. 

Elder R. H. Herring read report on Woman's W^ork. 

REPORT ON WOMAN'S WORK. 

When we speak of Woman's work, we usually think of it as some 
very insignificant thing. The money is collected in such small sums, 
that we do not realize what the aggregate is. 

Within the last twenty-five years, the women of the Southern 
Baptist Convention, through the Societies have contributed nearly two 
and one-half million dollars. 

The money contributed does not represent the most important part of 
the work done. 

The influence of the women in arousing mission interest in the 
churches, the mission study classes conducted by them, and the training 
of the young people through the Sunbeam Societies, Young Women's 
Auxilliaries, and Royal Ambassadors, means more to the cause of Christ, 
than can be estimated in dollars and cents. 

Eternity alone will reveal its far reaching results. 

The work of distributing mission literature has been almost wholly 
given into the hands of the women. 

The majority of our churches have preaching only once a month, and 
the pastors cannot do the many things needed foy the upbuilding of the 
Kingdom. 

If there is no active Womans Missionary Society in the church a great 
deal of the work goes undone. 

We pastors who give such scant encouragement to the Woman's 
Missionary Society, do not realize what a force for good you are 
neglecting. 

The active members of a Womans Missionary Society are among the 
pastors very best helpers in all phases of church work. 

We would call especial attention to a new work the women of the 
Green River Association are andertaking. 

We have just built a new Boy's Dormitory, and are in debt several 
hundred dollars for it. Some of our women conceived the idea of the 
women of the churches furnishing the rooms. 

Several Societies have agreed to furnish a room each, but if the 
women of a church do not feel that they can do that much, they can 
give just as much as they can and it will be applied on the furnishing. 

A washstand and dresser can be bought for nine dollars and a quarter, 
and any church can give this, if some active Christian woman, who is 



Green River Baptist Association 19 

vitally interested in the development of our boys and girls, will take up 
the work. 

Our people do not realize what a good school we have at Round Hill, 
and what a grand work it is doing. If the}' did, we would not hear of 
so many of our boys and girls going to other schools. 

The women recommend that an active woman in each church, one who 
loves young people, and who is intensely interested in their mental and 
moral development, be appointed to use her influence with the young 
people who are going off to school to get them to go to Round Hill. 

If they do not know of the work the school is doing, let them visit 
the school when it is in session, and see for themselves. 

R. H. Herring 
W. A. HarrilIv 
W. F. Sinclair 

After speeches by Elders R. H. Herring, Wni. H. Moore, 
and Brother N. C. Jones, report was adopted. 

The Moderator made a strong appeal for more preachers 
to attend the Association and for the Delegates to remain 
until the close. 

The announcement was made that if any Delegates wishing 
the Association to make requests to Committee on Time and 
Place. 

Talks were made by .several for us to take a greater interest 
in our surrounding vicinity. 

After prayer by Rev. M. B. Hamrick the Association 
adjourned to meet Saturday October 3rd, at 9:30. 

SATURDAY— Morning Session. 

October 3rd, 1914. 
9:30 song. Prayer by Elder H. D. Harrill. Scripture read 
by M. B. Hamrick, Matt. 6:9-10 "After this manner therefore 
pray ye: Our Father which art in Heaven Hallowed be thy 
name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done in earth, as it is 
in Heaven." Song. 

Prayer by Rev. Wm. H. Moore. 

Motion by J. P. Hyder, that Clerk be authorized to insert 
in the Minutes a table of each object of all finances. Motion 
lost for a second. 



20 Minutes of the 



Bro. J. L. Tajdor read report on aged ministers relief Board. 
AGED MINISTERS RELIEF BOARD. 

We are sorry that we are not able to give you more definite information 
regarding the Board having charge of this work, it is located at D'Trham, 
meeting four times each year, on the fourth Wednesday of February^ 
May, August and November. 

The object of the Board is to help the aged Baptist Ministers and 
their widows. 

The last report we have gives the number helped by the Board 35, there 
may be more at this time. 

We are informed that year by year the churches are giving more of 
their money to this cause, and this is as it should be, for to a large 
extent they gave their best their all to the cause of Christ, and in return 
we dole out a pitiful sum to them, in njany cases we favor so small as to 
barely keep soul and body together. 

We learn again that % of the churches in this State and more than yl 
of the Association give not one cent to this work, and many that do 
contribute give almost nothing. 

We learn further that at least four of the Associations that give 
nothing, have aged ministers that are being helped by this Board. 

This Association gave last year $172.54. We recommend that we 
undertake to give $200.00 this year, and that each church make a special 
offering on the Sunday nearest Christmas. Thts Christmas offering is 
growing in favor with our church and is greatly increasing the funds. 

Committee, 

J. L. Taylor 

A. L. RUCKER 

After discussion by Elders M. B. Hamrick, A. P. Sorrels, 
J. W. P. Hill and Bros. B. B. Price and J. L. Taylor, report 
was adopted. Song. 

Report on Foreign Missions was read by Elder Wm. H. 
Moore. 

REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS. 

The work of Foreign Missions should enter deep into the heart of 
every Christian for Jesus Christ himself came to this world in obedience 
to the command of His Father to do the work of a Foreign Missionary, 
for he said, "That my Kingdom is not of this world, I came not to be 
ministered unto, but to minister." No man can say that he does not 
believe in Foreign Missions and yet claim to be an earnest, humble 
follower of the Son of God and observing the teachings of the Lord 
Jesus. Jesus not only came and did the work of a foreign missionary, 



Green River Baptist Association 21 

but he commissioned that ever}' Christian should take up and finish the 
work that he had begun, for he said, "I say unto you, go ye, therefore, 
into all the world and preach the gospel to every creature. There was 
never a time when Foreign Missions needed the prayers and the loyal 
financial support of every Christian more than at this time, because our 
opportunities are greater than ever before and because of the distressing 
conditions in the East brought about by the present war. Therefore, 
we earnestly urge that not only every church in the Green River 
Association, but that every member of these churches shall give their 
most loyal, spiritual and financial co-operation with our Foreign Mission 
Board of Richmond, Va. 

The amounts that we have been contributing thus far to this glorious 
work is really a reproach to us. It measures largely our estimation of 
Jesus Christ as a saviour to a lost world. We call on the brethern of the 
Green River Association that we quit ourselves like men, coming up to 
the help of the Lord against the mighty. We recommend that our 
contributions for foreign missions be increased not less than 15 cents per 
member for this year. We further recommend, that every church take 
up the study of the doctrine of tithing, and that each church will form 
a tithers' band, seeking to influence as many members to become 
identified with this work as it is possible, and that the churches will 
apportion the titheings among the different objects of benevolence 
fostered by our State Baptist Convention, and that they shall then make 
an offering to the Lord sufficiently large to pay the expenses of their 
own church work. 

Respectfully subnntted, 

Wm. H. Moork 

W. F. SlNCI^AlR 
B. F. CORPENING 

After stirring talks by Elders Wm. H. Moore, R. H. 
Herring, M. B. Hamrick, report was adopted. 

On motion Rev. Wm. H. Moore is elected to represent 
Foreign Missions to Board in the place of Rev. R. H. 
Herring. Please see report. 

Elder A. P. Sorrels read report on State of Churches. 
REPORT ON STATE OF CHURCHES. 

Report on Digest of Letters. 

W'e find 42 Churches represented by letter. 

Rev. W. F. McMahan's Field— Armstrong, vSunny Vale, Turkey Cove, 
and Clear Creek, baptized 14; number in S. S. 252; contributions $218.49. 

Rev. G. G. O'Neills Field— Bethel, Glenwood. Mount Creek, Rock 
Spring, baptized 16; number in S. S. 273; contributions $656.69. 



Minutes of the 



J. B. Arledge's Field — Big Level, Coopers Gap, Silver Creek, baptized 
14; number in S. S. 78; contributions $391.18. 

Rev. B. M. Hauirick's Field— Bills Creek, Camp Creek, Pleasant 
Grove, baptized 11; number in S. S. 153; contributions I528 90 

Rev. C W. Walker's Field — Cane Creek, baptized 5; number in S. S, 
119; Contributions I52. 88. 

Rev. G. H. Weaver's Field— Chapel Hill, baptized 3; number in S. S. 
66; contributions 1142.50. 

Rev. J, A. Davis' Field — Cherry Springs, Old Fort, Bethlehem (report 
from the letter not in), baptized 41; number in S. S. 142; contributions 
$537.76. 

Rev. B. B. Harris' Field — Dysartsville, East Marion, Macedonia, 
baptized 49; number in S. S. 96; contributions $348.68. 

For next year Dysartsville has called Rev. F. M. Paston, East Marion, 
Rev. S. D. Tipton; Macedonia, Rev, R. L. Limrick. 

Rev. Z. D. Whitesides' Field— Eureka, baptized none; none in S. S. ; 
contributions $49.50. 

Rev. C. F. Filmets Field — Hickory Grove, baptized none; number in 
S. S. 40; contributions I149.00. 

Rev. J. W. P. Hills F'ield — Harmony Grove, baptized 5; number in S. 
S. 78; contributions $183.94. 

Rev. J. M. Walkers Field— Mills Spring, Columbus, Pea Ridge, 
baptized 4; number in S. S. 104; contributions $286.63. 

Rev. M. M. Huntleys Field — Montfords Cove, Mount Pleasant, 
baptized 8; number in S. S. 80; contributions $240.94. 

Rev. W. H. Moore's Field — Vjaptized 8; number in S. S. 178; con- 
tributions $3692.38. 

Rev. R. H. Herring's Field— Round Hill. Mount Vernon, Ruther- 
fordton, baptized 28; number in S. S. 445; contributions $3153.97. 

Rev. W. F. Sinclair's Field— Pleasant Hill, Beulah, Piedmont, bap- 
tized 23; number in S. S. 81; contributions $475.73. 

Rev. W. L. Haynes Field — Piney Knob, Whiteside Valley, (report of 
the former not in) , number in S. S. 60; contributions $75.88, 

Rev. A. P. Sorrels Field — Woodlawn, Nebo, baptized 6; number in 
S. S. 67; contributions $350.41. 

Rev. D. P. Lowdermilks Field— Zion Hill, Hall Town, (report of the 
latter not in), baptized 3; number in S. S. 44; contributions $84.21. 

Rev. W. F. Arledge Field — Mt. View, baptized none; number in S. S. 
40; contributions $97.70. 

Rev, D. J. Hunt's Field — Green Hill, baptized 3; number in S. S. 52: 
contributions $564.34. 

We find $48.69 reported for Minutes. 

A. P. S0RREI.S 
J. D. Taylor 



Green River Baptist Association 



After discussions by Elders R. H, Herring, Wm. H. Moore, 
J. W. P. Hill, A. P. Sorrels, it was requested that the Com- 
mittee namely, Rev. R. H. Herring, J. D. Morris and A. L, 
Rucker have the report on State of Churches not later than 
the second day next year. 

Elder G. G. O'Neill read report on Prohibition, 

REPORT ON PROHIBITION. 

We rejoice to see the wave of Prohibition spreading and sentiment 
for it nationally crystallizing. Recently Virginia has voted State wide 
prohibition; a number of Counties have gone dry by local option, only 
about fourteen counties being left, and a campaign is on in Virginia. 

We have statutory prohibition in North Carolina and the sale of 
intoxicants is illegal. The great mass of our citizens are law abiding 
and believe in law enforcement. 

Our needs are; first, for officers who will enforce the law; second, for a 
state wide law, making the place of delivery the place of sale. (We 
have such a law in Rutherford Couuty.) 

Therefore be it resolved: first, that we will not support vy^ith our 
suffrage any candidate for the Legislature who will not favor such a bill 
when it shall be presented to that body. Second, That we will not vote 
for any candidate for office who will not pledge himself to law 
enforcement. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. G. O'Neill 

After discussions by Rev. G. G. O'Neill and others whose 
names we did not get, the report was adopted by a rising vote 
of men and women. 

Bro. B. B. Price read report on Ministerial Education. 

niNISTERIAL SUPPORT. 

When our fathers organized the Baptist State Convention they saw 
that to become a great people our churches must have strong and 
efficient leadership. At the same time Wake Forest College was or- 
ganized and set into operation, the main purpose of which was to 
educate these men and send them out prepared to do their best for God 
and for the Churches. The Board of Education is charged with this 
particular work. With our churches multiplying, many churches call- 
ing for more preaching, the Mission Board crying for men, we should 
rejoice to see many of our choice young men entering the ministry 
Surely the fields were never whiter, nor the need for skilled laborers 



24 Minutes of the 



greater. The «cry is for strong young men, skilled yeung men, godly 
young men to fill the ranks. The hour has come for the man of affairs 
in the ministry as well as for the man of affairs in business, men who 
can lead in thought, men who can lead in heart, men who will lead in 
the example in Bible giving are the men the churches are calling for to- 
day, except the churches that are already dead. 

It seems that it has been God's plan for two thousand years, to lay 
his hands upon the poor young men and call them into the ministry. 
The poor seem to be his chosen people. Very few of these young men 
are able to pay their way through Wake Forest College and the Southern 
Theological Seminary, so our Baptist people have provided Educational 
Boards to solicit funds to help educate these poor boys whom the' Lord 
has called, and that is one of the most important objects that our 
churches pledge themselves to support, and yet one that we are sorry to 
say, many churches in our Association do not contribute one cent to this. 
Association has received more money through the young men who have 
been aided by these Boards, than we pay to them. We should blush 
with shame to let other Associations pay the tuition of our boys.' 

There is no question that the money spent through this channel has 
brought as large and rich returns to the denomination and to the 
Kingdom as any money that we have spent in any place. 

We have one young man now at Round Hill who no doubt will want 
to go to Wake Forest. We have not got the number of Ministerial 
Students now at Wake Forest receiving aid from the Board, but they are 
nearly if not quite one hundred. There are also more men in the 
Seminary from North Carolina than atiy other State. This work finding 
men and training them for the work of the Kingdom comes nearer 
representing the work of Jesus during His earthly ministry than any- 
thing that we are doing. Can our churches afford to be indifferent to- 
wards it. We gave last year the pitiful sum of $35.94. Let us make 
the coming year this contribution large enough to pay the tuition of at 
least one of these young men who has been called of God to preach 
His gospel. 

Respectfully submitted. 

B. B, Price 

Owing to shortness of time report adopted and not discussed. 
Elder A, P. Sorrels read report on Time and Place. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON TIME AND PLACE. 

Report of Committee on Time, Place and Introductory Sermon : 
Time — Thursday before the first Sunday in October. 1915. 
Pi^ACE — Chapel Hill Church, three miles south of Marion, N. C. 



Green River Baptist Association 



Introductory Sermon — Rev. W. H. Moore. 
Alternate— Rev. R. H. Herring. 

Committee, 

Rev. a. p. Sorrels 
R. Ledbetter 
Ben F. Corpening 
P. S. — The Delegation requests the Aseociation to consider the change- 
ing the Time of the Association. 

Report was adopted. 

Report of Committee on Delegates to Southern Baptist 
Convention, to State Convention and to nominate two 
Trustees for Round Hill Academy. 

To Southern Baptist Convention — Wm. H. Moore. 
To State Convention— A. P. Sorrels. 

Trustees for Round Hill Academy— W. A. Harrill, M. P. Flack. 

Committee, 

J. L. Taylor 
W. B. Wilson 
J. P. Hyder 

Collection for Minutes fund. 

Motion that the Clerk be paid $io for his service. 

Executive Committee — Rev. R. H. Herring, W. A. 
Harrill, R. P. Green, Rev. W. N. Moore, B. B. Price. 

Auditing Committee to examine Treasurer's Report last 
year, same this year, Brethren A. L. Grayson and T. C. 
Smith. 

On motion, the Moderator was authorized to appoint the 
Chairmen of the several Committees for the next session of 
the Association and forward same to Clerk for publication in 
this edition of the Minutes. 

Elder J. W. P. Hill read the following resolution, Resolved: 
That we express our profound thanks to the good people of 
Pleasant Hill and vicinity for their gracious and generous 
hospitality during the session of the Association, adopted by 
a rising vote. 

B. B. Price, 
Moderator, Marion, N. C. 
Rev. J. W. P. Hill, 

Clerk, Vein Mountain, N. C. 



26 Minutes of the 



P. S. — After announcements by the Committee on Religious 
Exercises for tomorrow, and discussing if the time of the 
Association , could be changed or not, the Association ad- 
journed to meet with the Baptist Chlirch at Chapel Hill on 
Thursda}^ before first Sunday in October, 191 5. All Churches 
are requested to inform their Delegates as to changing the 
time of the Association. 

SUNDAY— Morning Session. 

, Services opened by singing. Invocation by Rev. J. W. 
P. Hill. 

As Elder H. D. Harrill was not present Elder R. H. 
Herring filled his place in the pulpit. 

Scripture 2 Cor. 9. Prayer by Rev. Herring. After sing- 
ing he read Prov. 11:24, "There is that scattereth, and yet 
increaseth; and there is that wnth holdeth more than is meet, 
but it tendeth to poverty." 

After the sermon a collection was taken for the Orphanage 
which amounted to $9.36. 

Adjourned one hour for dinner. 

SUNDAY— Afternoon Session. 

Singing, prayer. Scripture Romans 10. Singing. Text 
Gal. 6:9, "And let us not be weary in well doing: for in due 
season we shall reap if we faint not." 

Song "God be with you till we meet again." 

RECESS APPOINTMENTS, FOR 1915. 

The Chairman of the following Committees for the next session will 
please prepare their reports by the next Session. 

Christian Education Rev. G. G. O'Neill 

Round Hill School J. D. Morris 

Thomasville Qrplianage Rev. J. W. P. Hill 

Old Ministers Relief Miles P. Flack 

Ministerial Education Rev. W. F. Sinclair 

State Missions W, F. Morgan 

Home Missions Rev, Wm. H. Moore 

Foreign Missions Rev. R. H. Herring 

Womans Work Rev. Wm. H. Moore 

Temperance Rev. G. H. Weaver 

State of Churches Rev. A. P. Sorrels 



Green River Baptist Association 27 



WOMAN'S MISSIONARY SOCIETIES, 



The Annual Meeting of the Woman's Missionary Societies 
of the Green River Association was held with the Round Hill 
Church, Sept. 14th, 1914. 

Devotional Exercises conducted by Mrs, R. H. Herring. 
Opening song "All Hail the Power of Jesus Name,". Read- 
ing 54th Psalm and prayer. 

The Annual Address by Miss Clara Morris, our new^ Vice- 
President, was excellent. The discussion of Round Hill 
School by Prof. ly. Q. Haynes was very instructive and Miss 
Carroll's on same subject was inspiring. Solo by Miss Cook 
was very much enjoyed by all. 

After recess for lunch Mrs. A. L. Grayson spoke ably on 
State Missions, followed by Miss Johnson who read a specially 
helpful paper on the same subject. Duet by Jennie Smith 
and Nitia Scruggs. 

Misses Alda Grayson and Eunice Benton read well prepared 
papers on Foreign Missions. 

Mrs. John Wells spoke feelingl}^ on Home Missions em- 
phasizing the work in Cuba, Mountain Schools, Immigrant 
work and Personal Service. 

Miss Hud gins talk on Sunbeam work was very instructive 
and interesting. The Training School was discussed by Mrs. 
A. L. Grayson. 

Greetings was extended to visitors from Sandy Run Asso- 
ciation, response b}' Miss Mary Washburn. 

After deciding to meet with Rutherfordton Baptist Church 
Friday before first Sunday in Sept., 191 5, the meeting closed 
with benediction b}^ Prof. L. Q. Haynes. 

Mrs. J. ly. TAYI.OR, Secretary. 



2S 



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Oreen River Baptist Association 



•29 



PLEDGES AND APPORTIONiVlENTS 



CHURCHES. 



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Armstrong ._ 

Bethel 

Bethlehem 

Beulah 

Big Level 

Bills Creek 

Camp Creek 

Cane Creek 

Chapel Hill 

Cherry Springs... 

Clear Creek 

Columbus 

Coopers Gap 

Dysartsville 

East Marion 

Eureka 

Glenwood 

Green Hill 

Hickory Grove.... 
Harmony Grove.. 

Macedonia 

Marion 

Montfords Cove.. 
Mountain Creek.. 

Mill Spring 

Mount Pleasant- 
Mountain View .. 
Mount Vernon .... 

Nebo 

Old Fort 

Piney Knob 

Pleasant Grove... 

Pea Ridge 

Pleasant Hill 

Rock Spring 

Round Hill 

Rutherfordton ... 

Silver Creek 

Stone Mountain.. 

Sunny Vale ... 

Turkey Cove 

Whiteside Valley 

Piedmont 

Woodlawn 

Zion Hill 

Totals 



$ 1.25 


$ 3-30 


2.25 


16.50 


2.25 


7.70 


.25 


1. 00 


2.25 


2.20 


3-25 


4 02 


1-25 


330 


2.25 


1. 00 


2.25 


5-50 


2.25 


ir.oo 


2.25 


550 


2.25 


11.00 


•50 


T.50 


1.50 


5-50 


1.50 


5-50 


1. 00 


3-30 


3-25 


8.80 


1-25 


1.75 


■50 


r.oo 


3-25 


9.90 


2.25 


2.20 


10.25 


99.00 


1.50 


18.70 


5-25 


22.00 


2.25 


11.00 


1.25 


1. 00 


1.25 


2.75 


5.25 


33- 00 


1-25 


3-30 


5.25 


27.50 


1.25 


3-30 


2.25 


5.50 


1-25 


3-30 


2.25 


11.00 


1.25 


5-55 


5-25 


44.00 


10.25 


115.50 


f-25 


1.25 


r-25 


1. 00 


1. 00 


2.20 


1. 00 


l.IO 


2.25 


3.30 


1.25 


2.50 


1.25 
1-25 


2.20 


2.20 


$106.75 


f535-22 



13-65 

1. 00 

3-90 
4,68 
4.30 
1.50 
6.50 

1,00 
2.90 

15.90 
1.80 

1-95 
5-72 
■50 
4.81 
2.00 
1.50 
7.15 
2.86 

91.97 
22,20 

44.30 
3.57 
1.50 
2.15 

34.J0 
2.00 

14.45 
3-50 
3-75 
1.50 
1-35 
1-50 

35-75 

70.50 
1. 00 
1. 00 
1.00 
1. 00 
4- 25 
2.50 
2.00 
1.60 



$ 2.60 

26.00 

11. 70 

3-90 

6.50 

11.70 

7.80 

3.90 

6.50 

11.70 

6.50 

14.10 

3-90 
9.10 

3-90 

10.40 

7.80 

2.00 

6.50 

11.70 

7.80 

104.00 

26.00 

52.00 

13.00 

1.50 

5.20 

52.00 

2.00 

23.40 

5-20 

7.80 

3.00 

28.00 

6.50 

52.00 

156.00 

^3-90 
1.30 

2.60 
1. 00 

5.20 
2.50 

2.00 
2.60 





$ 7-15 


1 1 .82 


70.32 




21.05 




6.15 


3.30 


18.15 


6.38 


30.03 


5.50 


22. T5 


5.75 


14.40 


19-25 


40.00 


13.75 


40.70 


12.35 


29.40 


[I.80 


55.05 


4.30 


12.00 


5-50 


2355 


5-50 


22.12 


1.37 


16,57 


14.50 


39.16 


3.00 


10.00 


1.56 


11.06 


12.50 


44-50 


4-75 


19.86 


11937 


424.34 


17-50 


85.90 


35-60 


159-15 


3.50 


33-32 


1. 00 


6.25 


3 -40 


14.75 


24.00 


148.35 


3-75 


12.30 


27.80 


98.30 


2.70 


15.95 


8.25 


27.55 


1.25 


10.30 


6.85 


55-45 


2.25 


17.05 


18.30 


155-20 


137-50 


489.75 


3-50 


10.90 


1. 00 


5-55 


2.60 


9-40 


1. 00 


5-IO 


6.00 


21.00 


2.00 


10.75 


2.75 


10.20 


1-75 


9-30 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



CHURCHES 



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Bethel 

Bethlehem 

Beulah 

Big Level 

Bills Creek... 

Camp Creek 

Cane Creek 

Chapel Hill .... 

Cherry Spring? 

Clear Creek 

Columbus 

Coopers Gap 

Col. for Minutes . 

Dysartsville 

East Marion 

Eureka 

Glenwood 

Green Hill 

Hall Town 

Harmony Grove... 
Hickory Grove ..... 

Macedonia 

Marion 

Mill Spring... 

Montfords Cove... 
Mountain Creek... 
Mount Pleasant... 

Mount Vernon 

Mountain View ... 

Nebo 

Old Fort 

Piney Knob 

Pleasant Grove 

Pleasant Hill 

Pea Ridge 

Piedmont 

Rock Spring 

Round Hill 

Rutherfordton .... 
Stone Mountain... 

Sunny Vale — . 

Silver Creek 

Turkey Cove 

Whiteside Valley. 

Woodlawn 

Zion Hill 



3.00 
9.60 
5.00 

1-35 
2.02 

3.65 



5.00 



2.50 



6.00 



3.00 
300 

5.00 

2.00 

18.15 

1. 00 

3.00 

3.00 

10.00 

2 50 

15.00 

3.00 

5.00 



2.00 
3.00 



3-55 



Totals 



5-75 
4.00 

r-35 
3.60 



5.00 



1 2. 00 
2.50 



6.00 
3.00 
1.52 



3.00 

5.00 

2.00 

16.20 

•50 

3.00 

5.00 

10.00 

2 75 

2.25 



3.00 



905 
2.00 

1.38 
9.00 



6,00 
2.67 



5.00 

2 00 

22.00 



2.00 

8.50 

4.00 
20.00 

4.20 



2.00 
2. 



5.20 
550 



2.50 



4.40 
5.00 



3.00 
3.00 

4.00 

2.00 

26.00 

1. 00 

3.00 
3.00 



2-75 



5.00 



2.00 
3.00 



1-35 



2 25 
3.00 



2.00 



2.50 



1. 00 
3 00 



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5.00 



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1-55 



3.00 



$121.32 I98.57 $105.59 $90-55 $27.55 I57.93 I1.82 1503.3^5 



60 I 
50 



I 

1.35 

1. 00 

.60 

2.00 

.80 

.30 
1. 00 
2.00 

1.40 
1.00 

5.38 
1. 00 
1. 10 
•50 
1.20 

1 85 

•30 

1.70 

1. 00 

■75 
3.00 
1.20 

■98 

•50 

2.34 

.80 

.50 

1.50 

.70 
1.30 

.20 
1.20 
1.03 
3.00 
5.00 

1. 00 
2.00 

.45 
1. 00 

.90 
1. 00 



1.82 



$ 3^6o' 
37-25 
'3-15 
5.08. 
10.07 
26.75 
.80 

•30 

13.00 
2.00 

17.72 
9.60 

5-38 
1. 00 
5 5t> 
23 50 
6.87 
3-37 

1.70 

9.00 
12.75 

3 00. 
20,20 

9.88 

87-45 
3.00 

2.34 
12.70 

6.50 
25.00 

12.10 
46.30 

5-95 
1.20 
19.03 
3,00 
5.00 

7.00 

i3^89 

^■45 

4.20 

4-45 
1. 00 



W. A. HarriIvL, Treasurer, Green River Association. 
We approve this report, 

A. h. Grayson, 
T. C. Smith, 



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Thompson-Watkins Co. 

DRUGGISTS 

Rutherfordton, N. C. 

Careful and prompt attention given phone and 
mail orders. 



Dr. a. J. Whisnant 

DENTIST 

OFFICE PHONE 50 RESIDENCE PHONE 138 

RUTHERFORDTON, N. C. 



C. E. JUSTICE J. L. DOBBINS J. D. SIMPSON 

JUSTICE-DOBBINS CO. 

Heavy and Fancy Groceries 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 
We sell J. L Nisson Wagons 

RUTHERFORDTON, N. G. 

Your Teeth Need Attention 

First-class dental work at reasonable prices. 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED 

Dr. JUSTICE, Dentist 

Over Streetman's Drug Store 
MARIOIV. N. C. 



V - 



THE CITIZENS BANK 

OF RUTHERFORDTON. N. C. 

We solicit accounts of farmers, business men and private 
individuals. The character of our directors assures you 
of conservative management of your funds. 

K. J. CARPENTER, President A. L. GRAYSON, Cashier 

J. C. COWEN, V.-President C. B. WILSON, Asst. Cashier 

I Garry a Complete Line 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

One Price to Everybody 
J. D. BLANTON, Marion, N. G. 

Dr. T. B. TWITTY DRUG CO., Inc. 

THE REXALL STORE 
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN 

Drugs, Paints, Oils and Toilet Articles, School Books 
and Supplies, Field and Garden Seed. 

RUTHERFORDTON, N. G. 



H. L. CARPENTER 

One Price Variety Store 
RUTHERFORDTON, North Carolina 



Round Hill Academy 

UNION MILLS, Rutherford Co., N. C. 



FACULTY 

L. Q. HAYNES, M. A Principal 

MISS BERTHA L. CARROI.L, B. A Lady Principal 

MISS BESSIE F. JOHNSON, B. A History, Latin 

MISS EUNICE BENTON, B. A Intermediate Dept. 

MISS OZA L. COOKE Piano, Voice 



ROUND HILL ACADEMY was organized by the Round Hill Church 
in 1899, and came under the supervision of the Home Board in 
1900 being one of the first two in North Carolina to become a 
part of the school system of Southern Baptists. 

During the fifteen years of its existence its property has increased 
to the value of about |i8,ooo, an increase of over a thousand dollars a 
year. The school owns three buildings, a large two-story administra- 
tion building, a dormitory for young men, and one. for young ladies. 
It is necessary to rent another building to serve as a dormitory for 
young ladies. There is a debt of about two thousand dollars on the 
school, incurred by the erection of the new dormitory for young nier, 
which must be paid this year. 

The school has graduated fifty-four young men and women who are 
in the following professions: 

Physicians i 

Journalists i 

R. R. Superintendents i 

U. S. Navy i 

House Mistresses 9 

Now in College '9 

Ministers 4 

Teachers 27 

Stenographers i 

The school has this year added a course of Home Economics to the 
work and gives instruction in house-work including cooking, sanita- 
tion, cleaning, serving, decoration of the home, and various other 
branches of house-work. 

Besides giving instruction in the regular literary course, the follow- 
ing branches are taught: Bible, Sunday School Pedagogy, Home 
Economics, and Agriculture. Christian education is our aim. 

A generous friend of the school, living in our village, has promised 
to give $1000 to the endowment fund of the school as soon as the debt 
is paid. The Home Board will supplement this gift. Every dollar 
you give means that two more will be given. A dollar invested in our 
school counts for more than many dollars invested in anything else. 



MINUTES 

OF THE SEVENTY-FIFTH ANNUAL SESSION OF THE 

GREEN RIVER BAPTIST 
ASSOCIATION 

HELD WITH 

CHAPEL HILL BAPTIST CHURCH 

Mcdowell go. n. c. 

SEPT. 30 AND OCT. 1, 2, 3, A. D. 1915 




Next Session will be held with the Church at Columbus, Polk 
County, N. C, beginning on Thursday before the first Sunday in 
October, 1916. 



LOFTIN a CO.. PRINTERS, GASTONIA. N. C. 



OFFICERS 

Bro. B. B. Price, Moderator . Marion, N. C. 

REV. A. P. Sorrels, Clerk . . Nebo, N. C. Untitn^ 

Bro. W. a. Harreli., Treasurer Rutherfordton, N. C. 

ORDAINED MINISTERS 

Arledge, J. B Saluda, N. C. 

Denton, J. R Dysartsville, N. C. 

Harris, B. B Dysartsville, N. C. 

Haynes, W. L Gilkey, N. C. 

Laughter, B. C Bob, N. C. 

Loudermilk, D. P Marion, N. C. 

McMahan, W. F Sunny Vale, N. C. 

Moore, Wm, H Marion, N. C. 

Mashburn, A, B Nealsville, N. C. 

Sorrels, A. P Nebo, N. C. 

Simmons, Fletcher Nebo, N. C. 

Weaver, G. H. . . Benson, N. C. 

LICENTIATES 

Sorrels, Clyde C Wake Forest, N. C. 



PROCEEDINGS 



CHAPEL HILL BAPTIST CHURCH, M'DOWELL 
COUNTY, N. C, THURSDAY, SEPT. 30, 1915. 

The Seventy-Fifth Annual Session of the Green River 
Baptist Association convened with this church today at 
11.30 a. m. 

Rev. Wm. H. Moore read a message from Paul to preach- 
ers and churches. 

Rev. A. P. Sorrels led in prayer. 

The sermon was preached by Elder Wm. H. Moore, from 
Mark 8 : 34, "Whosoever will come after me, let him deny 
himself, and take up his Cross, and follow me." 

Theme, "The hindrance to Christ's Kingdom" — Selfish- 
ness. 

The climax was reached in church members failing to 
"Tithe." 

Read Matthew 23:23. 

Recess 40 minutes. 

Afternoon Session 

Brother B. B. Price, the former Moderator, called the 
Association to order. 

Prayer by Rev. H. C. Moore, editor of the Biblical Re- 
corder. He was formally welcomed. 

The following new pastors were introduced to the body, 
viz. : J. P. Bennett, of Old Fort ; W. F. Sinclair, of Pied- 
mont; G. A. Martin, of Rutherfordton. 

Then organized by electing B. B. Price Moderator; Elder 
A. P. Sorrels, Clerk, and W. A. Harrill, Treasurer. 

The Moderator appointed Elder H. C. Moore to write 
the report on Sunday Schools. 



Minutes of the 



REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS. 

The Sunday school is the church engaged in the study and teach- 
ing of the Word of God. 

The attendance should therefore include all church members, 
their families, and friends, and every available person in the con- 
gregation and community. 

The equipment of the school for its work should be all that is 
necessary — in the way of rooms, literature, blackboard, charts, and 
the like — for the best work. 

The instruction should be based upon the Bible studied in a regu- 
lar and systematic way from Sunday to Sunday, and from year to 
year, for the Sunday school is the great Bible school of the people. 

The organization of the school should be simple, easy-running, 
and effective, with a duty for every officer and an officer for every 
duty. 

The upbuilding of tjie school both in quantity and quality of work 
should be the constant aim and endeavor of every officer and 
teacher and pupil and friend of it. 

Work is required to keep the Sunday school going — earnest, con- 
stant, definite work; and the Sunday school furnishes a great field 
for the training of workers for usefulness in the church and com- 
munity. 

Yielding fruit for God is, after all, the highest accomplishment 
and the greatest goal set before the Sunday school. If it fails here, 
it fails disastrously; if it succeeds here, its success is beyond com- 
putation. 

We urge our churches to take a yet livelier interest in their Sun- 
day schools, building them up in every way possible and making 
them still greater agencies for good. 

We urge our Sunday school officers and teachers, present and 
prospective, to take the Convention Normal courses, enter individ- 
ually or in classes, and thus capacitate themselves for wider effi- 
ciency and usefulness. 

We urge that our Sunday schools co-operate with our State Sun- 
day school Secretary, Mr. E. L. Middleton, of Raleigh, in our State- 
wide work, and that each Sunday school make a liberal offering at 
least once a year to Sunday school missions. 

Elder G. G. O'Neil read report on Education as follows, 
Viz.: 

REPORT ON EDUCATION. 

At the last session of the Convention was created the Board of 
Education of the Baptist State Convention. Its function is hot only 



Green River Baptist Association 



to raise and distribute funds for the education of young ministers, 
but to foster and promote all our Baptist educational institutions. 

Thoughtful Baptists everywhere now regard Christian education 
as an important factor in the evangelization of the world. Train- 
ing is essential to effective service. 

The Baptists own and control in North Carolina thirteen high 
schools and four colleges — Mars Hill, Chowan, Meredith and Wake 
Forest. These represent in plant, equipment and endowment a 
million and a half dollars, and enroll annually about 3,800 students. 
The Baptists of the South own the Seminary at Louisville, worth 
one million, one hundred thousand dollars, enrolling over three 
hundred students. 

Four things are essential to the preservation and promotion of 
these institutions: 

First. Our schools must compete financially with the State 
schools. 

Second. Our scholastic standards must be equal to those in other 
institutions. 

This is the task of the Educational Board. Of the $15,000 set as 
the aim for this convential year more than $10,000 remains to be 
raised. The State Convention has asked the churches to adopt the 
plan of systematic personal giving, placing Christian education on 
our church budgets for regular collections as any other missionary 
enterprise. 

It is recommended that this Association raise $150.00 for Chris- 
tian Education. 

G. G. O'NEIL 
J. D. MORRIS 
D. C. BROWN 

Remarks by himself and Elder H. C. Moore. 
Report adopted. 

By request H. C. Moore spoke on Biblical Recorder, and 
was asked to write a report later, which he consented to do. 

REPORT ON BIBLICAL RECORDER. 

Every one of the sixty-four white Baptist associations in North 
Carolina has endorsed the Biblical Recorder. Your committee would 
quote brief extracts from the reports adopted by this and con- 
tiguous associations in the past. 

Our own Association — the Green River — says: "The churches 
whose members are readers of the Recorder are doing more for all 



MiNUTKS OF THE 



the objects of the Convention than those members who do not read 
it. We recommend that the people put the Recorder a little closer 
to their hearts and give it a place in every home." 

The Buncombe says: "We recommend that every Baptist take 
and read the Biblical Recorder." 

The Carolina says: "The information obtained from its pages is 
indispensable to the person who desires to keep up with the prog- 
ress of our great Baptist denomination. The Recorder should be 
a weekly visitor in every Baptist home in the State." 

The Sandy Run says: "It is one of the greatest powers for good 
now in the State, but not so great as it should be on account of the 
comparatively small patronage." 

The Kings Mountain says: "There are other excellent journals 
ably conducted and well edited, but without the power and influ- 
ence of this one, our forces would be in constant confusion, our 
glory would fade, our church zeal would slacken, and the spirit of 
the brotherhood of man could not so perfectly find its enjoyment 
in our civilization. We heartily commend the present management 
of this paper as worthy of the confidence of our people and we note 
with joy the ever-increasing influence and power of this paper for 
righteousness and truth." 

The Catawba River says: "If a Baptist home can have only one 
paper, that paper should be the Biblical Recorder. It has always 
been good, but never better than it is today. One number is often 
worth the cost of the year. It should be in every Baptist home in 
the State." 

The Avery says: "We earnestly request our pastors in this Asso- 
ciation to encourage and urge their members to become subscribers 
to and readers of our paper." 

The Roan Mountain says: "It is estimated that there are 75,000 
Baptist homes in the State, At least half of our Baptist families 
should read it and feel it to be a household necessity. This would 
enable the publishers to render even better service and add to the 
strength of denominational life beyond conception." 

The Yancey says: "The Biblical Recorder is the best paper 
printed in North Carolina, and should be read by every Baptist 
family in the State. We earnestly urge that every family in our 
denomination take and read the Biblical Recorder." 

H. C. MOORE 

The Moderator appointed Wm. H. Moore and G. A. Mar- 
tin committee on Order of Business. 



Green River Baptist Association 



Announcements of homes for the delegates by Bro. B. F. 
Corpening-, of Chapel Hill Church. 

At the request of the Clerk the Moderator introduced 
Fletcher Simmons to the Association, who later welcomed 
the delegates and visitors to the kind hospitality of Chapel 
Hill people. 

By motion adjourned to 9.45 a. m. tomorrow. 

Friday Morning 9.45 a. m. 

Devotional exercises by Elder J. P. Bennett, of Old Fort. 

Gladly welcomed Elder W. R. Bradshaw, of Hickory, 
representing State Missions. 

The Clerk read the report on State Missions, written by 
W. T. Morgan. 

STATE MISSIONS. 

Reports to the last State Convention from our Mission Fields 
were the best ever before submitted, showing: 2,469 baptisms, an 
increase over the year before of 332. 

1,836 received by letter, which was 327 more than last year. 

An increase in pastors' salaries of nearly $3,000.00. 

Nearly $3,000.00 more contributed for church buildings than the 
year before. 

An increase in contributions for benevolent objects of approxi- 
mately $3,500. 

And further showing that the 5,265 members of the churches 
composing the Green River Association contributed for this object 
the sum of $385.92, an average of a little more than seven cents 
per member. 

W. T. MORGAN 
J. H. RABROM 
W. A. HANITE 

Remarks by W. R. Bradshaw, J. M. Walker. 

A motion by G. G. O'Neil, seconded by G. A. Martin, to 
ask an advance of ten per cent, on last year's contributions 
to all the objects of the Convention. 

Carried unanimously. However some preferred letting 
the delegates make pledges. 



Minutes of the 



Elder G. A. Martin read report, written by Rev. J. W. P. 
Hill, on Orphanage. 

ORPHANAGE REPORT. 

Our Orphanage is the keystone in the arch of Christian service. 
If this stone is properly placed all the others in the arch will hold 
firm; if it is improperly placed the whole structure is in danger. 

Love for the Orphanage among our brethren is intense but not 
universal. The great need is to lay upon the heart of every church 
and Sunday school the Orphanage obligation. If this consumma- 
tion is ever reached th6 problem for ample support for the institu- 
tion will be solved. 

Owing to the large advance that has been made within the past 
year the Orphanage is heavily in debt. This brings the unpleasant 
necessity of making a large outlay for interest on borrowed money, 
which goes to banks instead of to the children. This ought not so 
to be. We are abundantly able to pay every dollar the institution 
owes this year, and if able, we ought to be willing. 

It is proposed to our people that the income of one day be sacredly 
set aside, at or near Thanksgiving Day, and devoted to the Or- 
phanage. If this would seize the hearts of our people, and every 
man, woman and child would enter heartily into this loving ser- 
vice, every dollar of debt would be wiped out, and the institution 
would be free from the bondage that now hampers its work and 
curtails its usefulness. 

We earnestly urge every member of the churches of this associa- 
tion to join this "work day" movement and give the proceeds of 
one day's labor or income to the Orphanage. We may do more but 
we should not do less. 

Every Sunday school ought to set aside one Sunday in each 
month as Orphanage day and give the members an opportunity to 
make a contribution to the Orphanage. Only a little over one-third 
of our Baptist Sunday schools are enrolled among this loyal band 
of monthly givers. 

Every Sunday school ought to take a club of Charity and Chil- 
dren and an individual copy for pastors and homes that are not 
represented in the Sunday school. The paper is the right arm of 
the institution, and aside from the information and inspiration it 
furnishes, produces a good dividend for the support of the Orphan- 
age. 

During its thirty years of continued growth the institution has 
sheltered and trained over 1,600 boys and girls, who are now out in 
the State as teachers, preachers, doctors, printers, farmers, busi- 



Grekn River Baptist Association 



ness men and fathers and mothers of happy homes. There are 9 
in various colleges and about a dozen in the denominational high 
schools. The present number is 500 — 450 at Thomasville, 50 at 
Kennedy Home — with an average cost of $113.28 per child of 31 
cents the day, aggregating an annual cost of $56,640.00. 

Our Orphanage has been enlarged and still the task looms before 
us as just begun. We urge every member of this association that 
they regard the Orphanage in larger terms as an opportunity un- 
parallelled. This waiting door stands too wide for "same as last 
year" contributions to ever satisfy any working body of Baptists. 

Your committee recommend: 

1. A liberal Thanksgiving offering emphasizing the importance 
of "WORK DAY," giving not less than one day's labor or income 
to the Orphanage. 

2. That every Sunday school will sacredly set apart the collec- 
tion of one Sunday in each mnoth for the support of the Orphan- 
age. 

3. That every Sunday school take a club of Charity and Chil- 
dren. 

J. W. P. HILL 

B. F. CORPENING 

W. C. MORRIS 

On motion to adopt, remarks were made by A. Johnson, 
G. A. Martin, J. H. Raburn, J. M. Walker, and N. C. Jones. 
Collection $9.33. 

Announcements of committees by Moderator. 

H. C. Moore read report on Biblical Recorder which was 
discussed yesterday. 

Recess 40 minutes. 

Afternoon Session. 

Prayer by C. E. Brewer of Meredith College. 

Formally welcomed C. E. Brewer and introduced him to 
the body. 

Called for church letters to be handed to the Clerk. 

Wm. H. Moore read report on Time, Place, and Preacher 
for introductory sermon. 

TIME AND PLACE 

We, your committee on Time and Place, and preachers for the 



Minutes of the 



meeting of the next session of the association recommend t.hat we 
meet on Thursday before the first Sunday in October, 1916, with the 
Columbus Church in Polk County, and that Rev. G. A. Martin preach 
the sermon at 11 a. m. 

WM. H. MOORE 
J. J. HAMBRIGHT 
C. C. LOVELACE 

Report adopted by a majority vote, viz.: 
Rev. Wm. H. Moore read report on Foreign Missions. 
Which report was adopted after remarks by Wm. H. Moore. 

REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS 

Our foreign mission work should be the effort upon the part of 
every Christian to carry out the last command of our Lord and 
Savior Jesus Christ. We ought to love the work that our Master 
came all the way from heaven to inaugurate, to such an extent that 
we would give to it our most earnest prayers and liberal contribu- 
tions. The challenge of the hour to all of our churches is the 
present call of our foreign mission work. The world conditions of 
today are giving tremendous emphasis to the fact that every man 
needs a simple New Testament religion. The non-Christian nations 
are awakening in a wonderful way and enquiring for the path of 
peace and the way of life. The doors of non-Christian nations are 
wide open. The people are more accessible than ever before. The 
harvest fields are ripe and we should thrust in the sickle and reap 
on a scale for the glory of our Lord and Master that will far trans- 
cend anything in the past. Jesus said, "Go ye into all the world 
and preach the gospel to every creature." That commission falls 
alike upon every believer. 

The Foreign Mission Board, located at Richmond, Va., composed 
of eighteen local members and eighteen State members represent- 
ing each State in co-operation with the Southern Baptist Conven- 
tion, is conducting work in Italy, Brazil, Mexico, Argentina, China, 
Japan and Africa. In these fields the missionaries reported last 
year 382 churches with 819 out-stations, 33,584 church members, 
442 Sunday schools with 23,959 scholars and 8,833 students in mis- 
sion schools, 384 of whom are in theological seminaries and train- 
ing schools preparing to preach the gospel to their own people. 
There are 300 missionaries on the fields, twenty of whom were sent 
out during the past year, and a total of 651 native workers. Not- 
withstanding the difficult conditions on many of the fields caused by 
the European war and the injury to the work in Mexico from 



Green River Baptist Association ii 

chaotic political conditions through that country, 5,190 baptisms 
were reported during the year. 

The distressing financial conditions throughout the South created 
by the war in Europe caused a falling off in contributions to for- 
eign missions last year. Some of the churches did not contribute 
as much as usual. This will make it more difficult for us to main- 
tain the work this year unless God's people meet the situation in 
a heroic spirit. The Convention in Houston asked for an appro- 
priation of $624,000 for foreign missions this year. Every dollar 
of this amount will be necessary to carry on the work successfully. 
The supreme task resting upon us is the raising of our apportion- 
ment as a minimum. We should not allow a less amount to enter 
into our consideration. It is our duty to do even more than we 
have been requested if possible. 

We therefore recommend: 

1. That we as an association honestly endeavor to raise for for- 
eign missions our full apportionment; that this amount be divided 
among the churches on an equitable basis; that we earnestly urge 
the churches to contribute the amount asked of them; that each 
church adopt a plan of systematic weekly, or monthly, payments 
and that the offerings for this cause be remitted regularly in order 
that the Board may save interest on money that they will have 
to borrow otherwise to carry on the work. 

2. That each pastor in this association appoint a committee in 
each of his churches to canvass the membership to secure a pledge 
to foreign missions to be paid weekly or monthly. 

3. That each pastor will appoint a committee in his churches 
to canvass the membership to secure subscriptions to the Foreign 
Mission Journal that our people may be more fully informed as to 
our world-wide work. 

WM. H. MOORE 
FLETCHER SIMMONS 
W. H. TAYLOR 

Rev. G. A. Martin read report on Woman's Work. After 
a good talk by him the report was adopted. 

REPORT ON WOMEN'S WORK. 

The work of a Christian is nothing more or less than the unseen 
Master at His old time occupation — "going about doing good." The 
ruling passion of his redemptive ministry was to do good to a needy 
world. In giving expression to this passion "He went about seek- 
ing to save that which was lost," and to train and send out those 



12 Minutes of the 



whom he saved, that they might save others. It is the mission of 
every saved soul to bring another lost soul to Christ for salvation. 
From the very first, women have been his most loyal and efficient 
servants. While he was tramping the hills of Gallilee and Judea 
they followed him, "and ministered to him of their substance." The 
first European convert to Christianity was the "seller of purple" at 
Philippi. "Honorable women not a few" gave their hearts to him 
in Asia Minor, the region now torn in the terrible world war. Their 
number in our own blessed, peaceful land is legion. May their 
number increase with the coming years. Their vision is broader 
than the horizon, and like their Master, to them, world missions is 
not foreign. His field was a whole lost race and their efforts are 
girdling the earth with the gospel of light and life. Every phase 
of our denominational life, at home and on the far-flung battle 
front receives stimulation and inspiration from the impact of our 
consecrated women. The best part of their work defies tabulation. 
It cannot be set down in figures. 

A few of the things upon which they are laying special stress 
now: 

1. A larger prayer life. 

2. More accurate information about the needs and possibilities of 
the mission fields. 

3. An enlarged area of personal service. The best methods of 
doing more effectively the work of saving and conserving the lost. 

4. The enlistment of the unenlisted women in our churches. In 
all of this they should have our heartiest support and fullest co- 
operation. 

They gave last year to the different objects to which they make 
contributions more than $300,000. Surely the time has passed for 
senseless and sinful opposition to a work so manifestly of God. 

Respectfully submitted 
G. A. MARTIN 
N. C. JONES 
W. C. MORRIS 

Committee 

Saturday Morning 10 a. m. 

Devotional exercises by Elder G. A. Martin. 

Read minutes of yesterday. 

The Moderator introduced Rev. M. B. Ridenhour, a min- 
ister of the M. E. Church, v^^ho has recently joined the 
Marion Baptist Church. 



Green River Baptist Association 13 

Elder J. P. Bennett read report on Prohibition. 

REPORT ON TEMPERANCE. 

The progress of the temperance movement in the last year since 
our last report is very encouraging. Many important victories have 
been won over the liquor forces. Since the States under the Webb- 
Kenyon law have been enabled to exercise their own police power 
and enforce their prohibitory statutes many have entered the ranks. 
Virginia, Washington, Oregon, Alabama, Arkansas, Idaho, Colorado, 
Iowa, and South Carolina are now lined up. More than 52,000,000 of 
the population of the United States now live under prohibition. 
More than 71 per cent, of the area of our country is prohibition 
territory. One-fourth of all the people who live in saloon territory 
live in the four largest cities of the United States, viz.: New York, 
Chicago, Philadelphia and St. Louis. There are fewer saloons in 
the whole Southland than in the city of Chicago. It looks very 
hopeful now for nation-wide prohibition to come. We believe that 
a great deal has been done by the Anti-Saloon League to bring about 
such a revolution in favor of temperance. Our people need to be 
educated more and a stronger public sentiment aroused so that 
the officers may have the strong support and co-operation of the 
citizenship in the execution of the laws and then we need officers, 
fearless and patriotic, who believe in law enforcement. 

Respectfully submitted 
J. P. BENNETT 
FRANK KEATER 

On motion the report was adopted after remarks by J. P. 
Bennett, John Sane, W. F. Sinclair, M. C. Blanton, B. B. 
Price. 

Reports on Round Hill School Ministerial Education, 
Etc., were read by J. D. Morris, A. P. Sorrels, J. E. Hoyle, 
W. F. Sinclair. 

After several good talks, there was a committee com- 
posed of Judge M. H. Justice, Brethren A. L. Grayson, J. 
D. Morris appointed to proportion the indebtedness on 
Round Hill School among the churches, and ask that they 
pay off the notes within two years. 

MINISTERIAL EDUCATION. 
Round Hill has one ministerial student. Seventy-five dollars will 



14 Minutes of the 



cover his expenses for the term of nine months. The ministerial 
student pays no tuition. The above sum does not cover the ex- 
pense of clothing and incidentals. Wake Forest has eighty-two 
ministerial students this year. 

The Board gives each ministerial student $9.00 per month. 

The College gives free tuition to the ministerial students. This 
gives the ministerial student approximately $130.00 per year. This, 
however, does not cover the incidental expenses. 

There are thirty-four students in the Seminary at Louisville from 
North Carolina. 

The expenses there are $190.00 per session of eight months. No 
charge is made for tuition; the student has only to provide for liv- 
ing expenses, books and incidentals. 

They have been aiding a large number of men from North Caro- 
lina, and have already arranged to assist quite a number next ses- 
sion. In order to furnish this aid they are dependent upon volun- 
tary contributions from individuals and churches in the State. 

North Carolina has fallen behind in contributions for this pur- 
pose for several years past, and they have provided for North Caro- 
lina students considerably more aid than the State has furnished 
the Seminary. 

We believe in ministerial education we say, yet we gave for the 
purpose last year less than one-half the amount needed to defray the 
expense of one student through high school at Round Hill for one 
term. Last year we gave $31.42. 

Brethren we should do better than this. Can we not give more 
for this great cause? 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. F. SINCLAIR 

Committee 



ROUND HILL SCHOOL, UNION MILLS, N. C. 

Round Hill Academy has entered very auspiciously upon its 
seventh year of work. The enrollment to date is 91, with seventy- 
one in the High School Department. There are 56 young ladies and 
35 young men. Of the student body eighty-four per cent, are church 
members. The school has an excellent type of young men and 
young women in its students. Order has almost reached the ideal 
state. Among the boarding students there are twenty-four young 
men, and thirty young women. The Senior class numbers thirteen. 

In addition to the regular literary work the school is giving in- 
struction in home economics and agriculture. The classes in Bible 
and Sunday School Pedagogy are large, the Bible class numbering 



Green River Baptist Association 15 

nineteen, and Sunday school Pedagogy class numbering twenty-six 
and representing sixteen churches. 

The improvements that have been made while inexpensive are 
very helpful. The girls' home was given a coat of paint inside be- 
fore the opening, the walks have all been sanded, about forty wagon 
loads of rubbish has been moved, and a wood house has been built 
at the boys' home. 

Our needs are many. The school does not have any place that 
can be used as a play ground. With only a few dollars we could 
grade courts for tennis and basket-ball. We need a more conven- 
ient water supply. We need a larger home for the girls. The 
school debt is burdening us, and we need that cleared. But more 
than all these needs combined we need a larger place in the life of 
the churches over the association. We need the loyal support of 
many good Baptist homes that are not conscious of the work we 
are doing. Their patronage and financial support would make of 
Round Hill Academy a new institution. 

J. E. HOYLE 



REPORT OF FINANCE COMMITTEE FOR ROUND HILL 
ACADEMY. 

September 23, 1915. 

The Treasurer's books show the following items: 
The J. D. Morris Dormitory, built last year, cost complete 

and furnished $4,160.39 

The Trustees made a campaign for the school and received 

in cash 2,227.80 

They have now notes for $2,025.00. About $1,000.00 of these are 
collectable. 

The books show an indebtedness as follows: 
The Citizens Bank & Trust Company of Rutherfordton, one 

note $1,546.00 

The Commercial Bank of Rutherfordton 1,000.00 

The First National Bank of Marlon, N. C 900.00 

The Bank of Old Fort, Old Fort, N. C 600.00 

Mr. W. G. Flack, Union Mills, N. C 500.00 

Messrs. Carpenter & Taylor 139.76 

Nanney & Morris 35.52 

Peoples Bank, Union Mills, N. C 950.00 

Total indebtedness $5,671.28 

This amount has to consider credits on assets the collectable 
notes listed above. 



1 6 Minutes of the 



The Treasurer's books show the following items paid since last 
report: 
To campaign for school paid others than Trustees who 

made no charge $ 47.60 

Interest paid on school notes 455.03 

School notes paid 2,145.22 

Printing and advertising 107.78 

Material for J. D. Morris Dormitory 2,207.30 

Freight paid on material 281.00 

Paint 132.79 

Putting on paint 75.00 

Furniture 151.15 

Traveling expenses, speakers 12.15 

Coal 70.34 

Tuning pianos 9.00 

Grass seed for lawn 5.00 

Labor and hauling 764.26 



Total paid $6,463.72 

Respectfully submitted, 
W. F. FLACK 
GOWER MORGAN 
F. P. FREEMAN 

Committee 



Treasurer's report of running expenses of Round Hill Academy 
for the year 1914-1915: 

Statistical Table. 

Number of teachers employed 6 

Number of pupils enrolled 90 

Number of graduates 6 

The total number of graduates to date 60 

Financial Table. 
Credits. 

By tuition collected $2,016.64 

By house rents collected 215.18 

By Home Mission Board 600.00 

By entertainment 15.00 

By damage fees collected 8.00 

By other credits 60.48 

Total credits $2,976.95 



Green River Baptist Association 17 

Debits. 

To teachers' salaries paid $2,679.23 

To house rents paid 30.00 

To balance due on last year expenses 126.81 

To collecting tuition 30.00 

To phone rents 9.00 

Incidental expenses 256.60 

Total debits $3,131.64 

To balance debits due $ 154.69 

J. D. MORRIS, Sec'y and Treas. 
Round Hill Academy 

The report on Home Missions, written, read, and spoken 
to by the Clerk was adopted. 

HOME MISSIONS. 

The work of missions has been so thoroughly written upon under 
the heads of State and Foreign Missions that it is only necessary 
to call attention to some distinctions under the head of Home Mis- 
sions. 

Between the State and foreign nations lies our sister States and 
Cuba. There are some mighty problems to solve in these Southern 
States and Cuba viewed from Christ's kind and standard of religion. 

Unity is of Christ. The world's religion is legion. Satan is the 
leader in division. The home board is trying to save this glorious 
South land to Jesus the Christ as Lord in religion. 

Evangelization among the foreign population, who are now here, 
and who, from the sign of the times, will soon flood this land with 
emigrants, is one part of the home board's work. 

Co-operation for development among the Negroes is another fea- 
ture of this work. 

Christian education among the white folks of this South land is 
a third item of work done by the Home Board. 

Oh, for an evangelization that will enthrone Christ in the hearts 
of these people as King to rule their lives. 

Oh, for a co-operation that will enable every race of people to 
understand their relationship to God and to each other. 

Oh, for an educated people, who will be able to stand firm and 
secure on the "Rock of Ages" and fight Satan and his army till he 
and they are vanquished. 

A. P. SORRELS, Chairman 
A. P. NANNEY 
JOHN SANE 



1 8 Minutes of the 



Rev. J. E. Hoyle read report on Sunday Schools, which 
was adopted after being discussed by J, E. Hoyle, John 
Sane, N. C. Jones, W. T. Morgan, John Hodge. 

Recess 45 minutes. 

Afternoon Session 

Appointment and announcement of various committees, 
boards, representatives, etc., viz. : 

Auditing Committee — A. L. Grayson, T. C. Smith. 

Trustees for Round Hill School — J. D. Morris, M. L. Jus- 
tice. 

Committee to Apportion the Debt on Round Hill School 
Among the Churches — Judge M. H. Justice, A. L. Gray- 
son, and J. D. Morris. 

Executive Committee — Rev. G. A. Martin, Chairman ; 
Rev. Wm. H. More, Bro. R. P. Geer, Bro. W. A. Harrill and 
W. T. Morgan. 

Delegate to Southern Baptist Convention — Rev. Wm. H. 
Moore. 

Delegates to Baptist State Convention — Rev. G. A. Mar- 
tin, Rev. A. P. Sorrels, Bro. W. T. Morgan and Bro. B. B. 
Price. 

The Clerk presented the resignation of A. L. Rucker, 
Historian, which was accepted. The appointment of his 
successor was left to the Moderator. 

A vote of thanks was tendered the Chapel Hill Church 
for their liberal hospitality in entertaining the Association. 

THANKS. 

We, the delegates and visitor sattending the Green River Baptist 
Association, wish to record our sincere gratitude for boundless 
hospitality and gracious entertainment accorded us by this church 
and sister churches co-operating with it. 

Also Brother B. F. Corpening very kindly thanked the 
people of Marion, Glenwood, and community around for 



Green River Baptist Association 19 

liberal and fraternal aid in caring for the delegates and 
visitors. 

Rev. F. L. Simmons thanked the Association for coming 
to Chapel Hill and invited it to come again. 

A collection of $6,15 was taken to supplement the minute 
fund. 

Rev. A. P. Sorrels read report of committee on State of 
Churches as follows, viz. : 

STATE OF CHURCHES. 

Your committee is unable to make a satisfactory report on the 
state of the churches. 

1st. We note that there were 209 baptisms. Twenty-four less 
than last year. Yet some of the church letters are not yet in. 

2nd. There is a small increase in gifts. 

3rd. There are a large number of names enrolled on the church 
books who are non-resident and non-contributing. 

4th. Many of the churches have pastors who do not live among 
the membership or even in the territory of the Association. 

A number of the pastors failed to attend the association, hence 
their churches will not get the information, inspiration, and en- 
thusiasm they would have gotten. 

6th. Among some of the churches there is a desire for a cheap 
ministry. 

7th. We advise them to look first for efficiency. Then give them 
a liberal, not extravagant, support. 

8th. We note with pleasure a number of promising young men 
in the pastorate. 

On motion to adopt talks were made by A. P. Sorrels, G. 
A. Martin, Wm. H. Moore. 

The church letters show 11 pastors who are out of the 
territory of this Association, and only 8 living in its bounds. 

Two of the 8 failed to attend and two of the non-resident 
pastors were present. Thanks to G. G. O'Neil and J. M. 
Walker for their presence. 

All pastors are urged to attend the meetings of the Asso- 
ciation. 



20 Minutes of the 



Churches are advised to co-operate in calling pastors, 
and insist that he locate among the people where he 
preaches. 

On motion of W. T, Morgan it was voted that the Clerk 
have ten dollars for his services. This amount to be taken 
out of the Minute Fund. 

All churches are urged to increase the amount for Min- 
utes. 

Some very important matter is left out for lack of funds 
to pay for printing CLERK. 

On motion adjourned to meet with the Columbus Bap- 
tist Church on Thursday before the first Sunday in October, 
1916, A. D. 

B. B. PRICE, Moderator 
Rev. A. P. SORRELS, Clerk 

Sunday Morning 11 a. m. 

Elder J. E. Hoyle preached a very able sermon. Subject : 
"Immigration." 

After which a collection for State Missions was taken, 
amounting to $6.55. 

CLERK 



Green River Baptist Association 



Z. T. WHITESIDE 

The death of Elder Z. T. Whiteside removes a useful and be- 
loved minister from the ranks of our brotherhood in the Green 
River and adjoining associations. A memorial tribute to this good 
man, written by Bro. A. L. Rucker, of Rutherfordton, appears below: 

Elder Zachary T. Whiteside was born in Rutherford County, N. 
C, December 12, 1846, and died at his home on Broad River, June 
11, 1915; aged sixty-eight years, five months, and thirty days. 

He served in the Confederate Army among the seventeen-year 
recruits. Returning from the army without visible means of sup- 
port he and elder brother entered Wofford College, S. C, graduat- 
ing with the class of 1877. 

He was converted early in life, and with his conversion came the 
call to the ministry. He was ordained to this office July 6, 1888, at 
Rock Spring Church by a presbytery consisting of Elders A. L. 
Stough, C. B. Justice, W. H. Logan, T. Bright, and others. Later 
he served as pastor of Rock Spring, Pleasant Grove, Whiteside Val- 
ley, and Eureka Churches, the last named being established by him 
and his friends, December 27, 1879. 

His position as an educator was little or no less famed than his 
work among the churches. An institute conductor in Polk and 
Rutherford Counties on several occasions, and principal of private 
or public schools of Valley Falls, New Prospect, Landrum, and 
Campton, South Carolina; and of Rutherfordton, Forest City, Eu- 
reka, Old Fort, Piedmont and others in North Carolina. 

He married Miss Sue Morgan of Rutherford County, N. C, July 
5, 1879; she died December 27, 1907. Three children survive: Mrs. 
M. B. Noland, Asheville, N. C; Mrs. Dr. Russell Walden, Landrum, 
S. C, and James W. Whiteside, Uree, N. C. 

With a normal weight of 200 pounds, he was a man of command- 
ing appearance; with the sympathies of a woman's heart, he wept 
with the sorrowing; and with a child-like faith, he loved his Lord 
and Master above all else. 



22 



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23 



PLEDGES AND APPORTIONMENTS 






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Armstrong 

Bethel 

Bethlehem 

Beulah 

Big Level 

Bills Creek 

Camp Creek 

Cane Creek 

Chapel Hill 

Cherry Springs ... 

Clear Creek 

Columbus 

Coopers Gap 

Dysartsville 

East Marion 

Eureka 

Gleuwood 

Green Hill 

Hall Town 

Hickory Grove 

Harmony Grove... 

Macedonia 

Marion 

Montfords Cove.... 
Mountain Creek .. 

Mill Spring 

Mount Pleasant... 
Mountain Vievv^... 

Mount Vernon 

Nebo 

Old Fort 

Piney Knob 

Pleasant Grove 

Pea Ridge 

Pleasant Hill 

Rock Spring 

Round Hill 

Rutherf ordton 

Silver Creek 

Stone Mountain... 

Sunny Vale 

Turkey Cove 

Whiteside Valley. 

Piedmont 

Woodlawn 

Zion Hill 



I-50 
2.50 
2.50 
•50 
2.50 
350 
1.50 
2.50 
2.50 
2.50 
2.50 
2.50 
1.00 
2.00 
1.50 
1. 00 
350 
I-50 
125 
1. 00 
450 
2.50 
10 50 
2.00 



■50 
•50 
.50 
•50 
50 
■25 
•50 
•50 
50 
I 50 
2.50 
1.25 
5.50 
11.00 
I 50 
I 50 
1.00 
1. 00 
2.50 
1.50 
1-25 
1.50 



$ 3.50 
18.00 
8.00 
1.50 
2.50 
4-50 
350 

1-25 

550 

12.00 
6.00 

12.00 
2.00 
6.00 
6.00 

3-50 

10.00 
2.00 

3.50 

1.50 

11.50 

2.50 

100 00 
20.00 
24 00 
12.00 

1 50 
3.00 

35- 00 
350 

30.00 
3.50 
6.00 
3-50 

12.00 

5 55 

48.00 

120.00 

1.50 

1.50 

2 50 
1.50 
3-50 
3.00 
2.50 
2.50 



2.00 
15.00 
6.00 
1.50 
4.00 
5.00 
450 
1.50 
6.50 
2.00 
3.00 
17.00 
2.00 
3.00 
6.00 
1. 00 
5.00 
2.00 
450 
1.50 
7-50 
3.00 
93.00 
25.00 
45- 00 
5-00 
1.50 
2 50 
3500 
3.50 
15.00 
4.00 
4.00 
2.00 
2.00 
1.50 
37.00 
75.00 
1.50 
1.50 
2.50 
1.50 
4.50 
3.00 
2.00 
2.00 



Totals $120.00 I591.80 $467.50 I796.25 $638.75 $2574.30 



$ 2.75 

28.00 

13.00 
4.00 
7.00 

12,00 
8.00 
4.00 
7.00 

12.00 
7.00 

15.00 
4.00 

10.00 
5.00 

10.50 
8.00 
2.50 
350 
6.50 

11.00 

8.00 

110.00 

27.00 

55 00 

14.00 
2.00 
550 

55 00 
5.00 

25.00 
550 
8.00 
3.50 

30.00 
6.50 

55.00 
160.00 
4.00 
1.50 
1.50 
150 
550 
3.00 
2.50 
3.00 



) 3-00 

15.00 

10.00 

3.00 

3.50 

7.00 

6.00 

6.00 

20.00 

14.00 

13.00 

14.00 

4.50 

6.00 

6.00 

2.00 

15.00 

3-50 

750 

2.00 

1350 

5-00 

125.00 

18.00 

36.00 

5.00 

2.00 

3.50 

25.00 

4.00 

30.00 

3.00 

8.50 

1.50 

7.00 

2.25 

20.00 

140.00 

4.00 

1.50 

3.00 

1.50 

7.00 

2.50 

3.00 

2.00 



12.75 
78.50 
39.50 
10.50 
19.50 
32.00 
23.50 
15-25 
41.50 
42.50 
3T.50 
60.50 
14.50 
27.00 
24.50 
18.00 
41.50 
11.50 
20.25 
12.50 
48.00 
21.00 

438.50 
92.00 

165.50 

38-50 

8.50 

16.00 

155-50 
17.25 

105.50 
17-50 
29.00 
12.00 
53.50 
17-05 

165.50 

506.00 
12.50 
7.50 
10.50 
7.00 
23.00 
13 00 
11.25 
11.00 



24 



Minutes of the 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



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Armstrong 

Bethel 

Bethlehem 

Beulah 

Big Level 

Camp Creek 

Chapel Hill 

Cherry Springs ... 

Clear Creek 

Columbus 

Coopers Gap 

Bills Creek 

Dysartsville 

Eureka 

Glenwood 

Green Hill 

Hall Town 

Harmony Grove... 

Hickory Grove 

Macedonia 

Marion 

Mill Springs 

Montfords Cove... 
Mountain Creek . 
Mount Pleasant... 

Mount Vernon 

Mountain View... 

Nebo 

Old Fort 

Piney Knob 

Pleasant Grove 

Pleasant Hill 

Pea Ridge 

Piedmont 

Rock Springs 

Round Hill 

Rutherfordton 

Zion Hill 

Col. for Minutes. 



6.23 

.85 

•50 

2.00 

2.10 

2 73 
11.00 

7.00 
1.50 
4.00 
1-56 
5.00 

8.50 
2.00 
5.10 
6 00 
2.00 

3.00 

405 

21,00 



2.00 

15.00 
1. 00 
550 

16.40 
1. 00 

12.50 
3.00 



6.G0 

1,00 
2.50 
3.20 
2.70 
1. 00 

[O.OO 

1.80 

4.00 

.50 

1. 00 

1. 00 
2.00 

3.00 

2.00 

3-00 
1.30 
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3-75 
1-35 
1. 00 
2.50 
2.55 



$ 

6,00 

3.88 

1. 00 


$ 


6.oo| 
4-25 
1. 00 


2.50 

2.00 




295 



11.70 


25.00 


5.00 




3-90 


4.30 


4.00 


2.40 




50 


5.00 


5.00 


1. 00 


.22 


2.00 






1.75 




2.00 


3.00 


4.95 


2.45 


•50 


24.90 


19.40 


4.00 


2.50 




20.00 


3-40 


1.70 


5-17 


5-17 


28.00 


6.85 


1. 00 


.90 


2.50 


2.00 


1.88 


1-50 







2.25 



•30 



3.00 

2.00 



3.00 



2.25 

1-25 

150 



$ .30$ 

r.oo 

1,00 

.60 

1. 00 

•45 
70 



2.30 
•25 
•50 

1-25 

50 

1.30 
1.20 
.40 
1. 00 
1. 00 

• 75 
3-00 

.90 

•50 
2.50 

.70 
1.60 

.60 

.80 
2.00 

.40 

.80 
2.10 

.60 
1.70 
1.20 
4.00 
5.00 

.80 
6^15 



.60 



2.59 



1. 00 



Totals $14952 $79.20 $114.23 $120.79 $i7^8o $51.15 I4.19 $56r.48 



•30 

25 23 

9.98 

4 10 

8 60 

10.70 

838 

51.40 

2 30 

22 25 

12.00 

15.65 
3.06 

16.30 
1.30 

12.22 
8.40 
6.10 

14.85 
8.75 
3.00 

14.85 

8.80 

88.89 

.70 

1.60 

12.10 

.80 

40.00 

8.00 
20.39 
56.95 

4^5o 
22.45 
11.63 

4.00 

5.00 
.80 

6.15 



Respectfully Submitted, 
W. A. HarrilIv, Treasurer Green River Association 
We approve above report, ^ 



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Round Hill Academy 

UNION MILLS, Rutherford Co., N. C. 



FACULTY 

REV. J. EDWIN HOYLE, B..A \ Principal 

MISS BERTHA L. CARROI.I., B. A Lady Principal 

MISS EUNICE BENTON, B. A. . . . . Latin, Mathematics 

MR. GORDON SCOGGIN Intermediate Department 

MISS OZA L. COOKE. Piano, Voice 



ROUND HILL ACADEMY was organized in 1889 to further 
Christian Education. The School owns three buildings; a 
large two-story administration building, a new dormitory for 
the young men, and one for the young ladies. It is necessary to 
rent another building for the young ladies. 

In addition to the regular literary work the school offers instruction 
in Home Economics, Agriculture,^ Sunday School Pedagogy, and 
Bible. The school has recently been elected a member of the system 
of schools fostered by the Baptist State Convention of N. C. It is 
owned and controlled by the Baptist Denomination. It is chartered 
and gives diplomas which are accepted by the leading colleges of the 
South. 

Expenses are as follows per quarter: 

Sixth Grade $4.50 

Seventh Grade . 5.00 

Eighth Grade 5.50 

Ninth Grade 5.50 

Tenth Grade 6.00 

Eleventh Grade 6.00 

Piano 5.50 

Voice 5.50 

Heat 1. 00 

Board, club plan per month, about . . 6.50 
Room, club plan per month 50 

Christian Education is our aim. We solicit your 
patronage, your financial support, your sympathy, and 
your prayers. 



MINUTES 

OF THE 

SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL SESSION 

OF THE 

Green River 
Baptist Association 

HELD WITH 

Columbus Baptist Church 

COLUMBUS, N. C. 
SEPTEMBER 28, 29 AND 30, AND OCT. 1, 1916 



OFFICERS 



Bro, B. B. Price, Moderator. Marion, N. C. 

Rev. G. a. Martin, Vice-Moderator Rutherfordton, N. C 

Rev. a. p. Sorrels, Clerk Union Mills, N. C. 

Bro. W. a. Harrell, Treasurer Rutherfordton, N. C. 



Next Session will be held with the Church at Round Hill, 
Rutherford County, N. C, beginning on Thursday before the First 
Sunday in October, 1917. 



OFFICERS 

Bro. B. B. Price, Moderator . Marion, N. C. 

Rev. G. a. Martin, Vice-Moderator Ruthertordton, N. C. 

Rev. a. p. Sorrels, Clerk Union Mills, N. C. 

Bro. W. a. Harrili., Treasurer Rutherfordton, N. C. 



ORDAINED MINISTERS 

Arledge, J. B Saluda, N. C. 

Champion, R. C R. F. D. 8. Landrum, S. C. 

Denton, J. R Dysartsville, N. C. 

Harris, B. B Dysartsville, N. C. 

Haynes, W. I, R. i, Union Mills, N. C. 

Hoyle, J. E Andrews, N. C. 

Laughter, B. C Mill Spring, N. C. 

Laudermilk, D. P Marion, N. C. 

Martin, G. A Rutherfordton, N. C. 

McHahan, W. F R. i, Old Fort, N. C 

Moore, Wm. H. Marion, N. C. 

Mashburn, A. B. . . Nealsville, N. C. 

Norville, C. T. S Old Fort. N. C. 

Sorrels, A. P. . Union Mills, N. C. 

Simmons Fletcher Nebo, N. C. 

Snipes, M. V Nebo, N. C. 

Weaver, G. H Benson, N. C. 



EXECUTIVE BOARD OF MISSIONS 

Rev. G. A. Martin, Chairman Rutherfordton, N. C. 

Rev. Wm. Moore Marion, N. C. 

Bro. A. L. Grayson . Rutherfordton, N. C. 

R. P. Geer Rutherfordton, N. C. 

W. A. Harrell Rutherfordton, N. C. 

J. D. Morris Union Mills, N. C. 

B. B. Price Marion, N. C. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES FOR ROUND HILL SCHOOL 

Rev. G. A. Martin. President Rutherfordton, N. C. 

J. D. Morris, Sec. & Treas Union Mills, N. C. 

W. F. Flack Union Mills, N. C. 

B. B. Price Marion, N. C. 

W. T. Morgan Marion, N. C. 

M. L. Justice Rutherfordton, N. C. 

W. A. Harrell Rutherfordton, N. C. 

J. L. Taylor Rutherfordton, N. C. 

M. P. Flack , Vein Mountain, N. C. 

Rev. A. E. Brown Asheville, N. C. 



MISSION REPRESENTATIVES 

Rev. G. A. Martin, Rutherfordton, N. C, State Missions 
Rev. Wm. H. Moore. Marion. N. C, Foreign Missions 
Rev. A, P. Sorrels, Union Mills, N. C, Home Missions 



Churches and Delegates Elected 

Armstrong — By Letter. 

Bethet.— A. D. Epley, W. C. Morris, M. C. Morgan, W. C. Raburn. 

Bethlehem — James M. Gibson, W.J. Condrey, Zeb Lackey. 

Bkulah — W. G. Wilkie, James Smith, James Page. 

Big Level — Roland Ruppe, Henry Smith, Grover Green. 

Bills Creek— Jno. F. Logan, Wm. M. Flynn. 

Camp Creek — W. B. GuflFey, J. B. Condrey, Eddie Morehead. 

Cane Creek— M. A. Searcy, J. P. Harris, B. E. Haynes, C. W. 
Searcy. 

Chapel Hill — Albert Poteet, C. B. Corpening, Ray Poteet. 

Cherry Springs— C. E. Gilliam, J. Y. Gilliam, N. S. Robertson. 

Clear Creek— G. B. Woody, L. M. Turner, N. Buchanan, Cecil 
Woody, 

Columbus— B. F. Green, J. R. Smith, J. T. Gilbert. 

Coopers Gap — Twitty Jackson, Robert Blanton, J. L. Jackson, J. 
W. Biddy. 

Clinchfield— Admitted by Leiter. 

Dysartsvillk— L. G. Price, J. D. Hogan. E. P. Denton, J. A. Daves. 

East Marion— By Letter. 

Glenwood — E. S. Brown, L. A. Rayburn. 

Greenhill — James A. Rucker, Adam G. Walker, Cebron Hyder. 

Mountain Creek— H. P. Rucker, A. F. Geer, J. P. Hyder, J. H. 
Keeter, W. G. Geer. 

Hall Town — George Hall. 

Harmony Grove— C. F. Dyson, J. S. Pyatt, J. A. Hensley. 

Hickory Grove— A. L. Pitman, J. C. Stott, A. L. Martin. 

Macedonia— Geo. F. Rhom, W. E. Watkins, T. C. McDaniel, Geo. 
E. Rhom 

Marion, First— Rev. Wm. H. Moore, B. B. Price, C. C. Lesenbee. 

Mill Spring— J. J. Lambright, J. H. Gibbs, W. F. Pack. 

Mt. Vernon— W. O. Justice, G. B. Padgett, E. H. Logan, W. W. 
Walker, W. B. Wilson, J. D. Logan 

Nebo— A. P. Sorrels. 

Old Fort— R. F. Hughes, R. S. Early, C. G. Vess. 

Pleasant Grove— W. H. Mclntvre,' M. C. Blanton, A. H. Lynch, 
H. B. Elliott. 

Pleasant Hill— C. C. Lovelace, D. C. Nanney, W. O. Taylor, W. 
W. Camp, W. L. McFadden. 

Pea Ridge— J. R. Philips, W. L. Gibbs. 

Piedmont— O. H. Hill, C. W. Hodge, E. P. White, J. L. Hodge. 

Pacolet— R. E. Hooker, Admitted at this Session. 

Rock Springs— W. E. Elliott, M. H. Whitesides. H. M. Whitesides. 

Round Hill— J. D. Morris, C. F. Keeter, Z. V. Morris, Harrison 
Nanney, Grady Nanney. 

Rutherfordton— H. T. Green, J. L. Taylor, M. L. Edwards, C. W. 
Keeter. W. A. Harrell, R. P. Geer, A. R. Yelton, G. A. Martin. 

Silver Creek— James Arledge, W. J. Green, Clem Williams. 

Whitesides Valley— G. Nanney, F. J. Shytle, O. H. Robertson. 

WooDLAWN— Letter. 

ZiON Hill— J. O. Pendergrass. M. J. Hall. 

Mountain View— N. C. Burgess, J. G. Jackson. 



PROCEEDINGS 



Columbus, Polk County, September 28, 191 6 

The Green River Baptist Association convened with the 
Columbus Baptist Church at 11:00 A. m. today. 

Prayer by Rev. G. G. O'Neill. 

Elder J. M. Walker introduced Elder G. A. Martin who 
preached the Introductory Sermon. Subject: "Ye Shall 
see greater things than these."" 

Recess one hour. 

THURSDAY— Afternoon Session 

Afternoon session began at 2:00 p. m. 

The following committee on digest of letters was an- 
nounced: J. M. Walker, W. A. Harrell, Wm. H. Moore. 

By motion the rules were suspended and the following 
officers were elected by rising vote: 

B. B. Price, Moderator. 

Rev. G. A. Martin, Vice-Moderator. 

Rev. A. P. Sorrels, Clerk. 

W. A. Harrell, Treasurer. 

Committee on order of business — Rev. G. A. Martin, 
Chairman, Rev. J. M. Walker and R. ?. Geer. 

Subject on Sunday Schools was read by Rev. C. T. S. 
Norville, as follows: 

REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS 

To say that the churches in our Association have not made con- 
siderable progress along on the lines of Sunday School work would not 
be giving them justice, but to say that they have done their full duty 
on this line of work is saying too much. 

The Minutes of last Association may show a gain or a loss Now the 
question comes are; we content with these losses and gains? Does it not 
stand to reason, judging from previous reports, that we need a pro- 
gressive campaign in otir Association in behalf of our Sunday Schools ? 
It is generally admitted that the success of the churches is dependent to 
a very large extent on the success of the Sunday School, and if this be 



Green River Baptist Association 



true, then to get a good worker enlisted in the Sunday School means 
lanother soldier for the cause of Christ and Christianity. 

How can we get in motion a campaign for better Sunday Schools? 
And is this not the time and place to give it a start ? To do this is to 
tnake better the conditions of our churches, our communities, our 
liomes, and prepare men and women to serve better and to live closer to 
•God. What we need is progress and not to be satisfied with what little 
we are doing. 

Stop a minute and realize what the Sunday School is. It has been 
said that "The Sunday School is the nursery of the church," and I 
believe it, and I think that if all our churches would report correctly, it 
would be proven that nine-tenths of all additions to our churches came 
to us from the Sunday Schools, The babes are born into Christ's 
Kingdom from the Sunday Schools. "The hand that rocks the <::radle 
rules the world." Then, Oh! Sunday School officers and teachers, 
what a wonderful opportunity is yours, and how great is the responsi- 
bility. It is through your hands that God shapes the destiny of 
nations. It is your hands that sustains churches, builds orphanages, 
ordains ministers, and sends them to all nations — preaching the Gospel 
to all creatures everywhere, and thus spreading the Gospel of God to 
enlighten the world, 

C. T. S. NORVILLK 
W. C. Raburn 

Remarks by R. P. Geer, John Hodge, J. h. Taylor, M. 
L. Edwards and others. The report was adopted. 

By motion received into the body Clinchfield Baptist 
Church. 

Recognized W. R. Beach representing the Biblical Re- 
corder. Also W. L. Poteat representing Christian Edu- 
cation. Welcomed C. T. S. Norville, pastor at Old Fort and 
M. M. Huntley of the Sandy Run Association. 

Rev. Roy Eewis returned from Florida and Bro. G. M. 
Hicks of North Spartanburg Association, S. C. 

Report on Biblical Recorder read by W. R. Beach. A 
lively discussion followed in which the following brethren 
participated. 

W. R. Beach, Wm. H. Moore, J. L. Taylor, J. P. Hider, 
F. E. Simmons, G. A. Martin and B. B. Price. 
REPORT ON BIBLICAL RECORDER 

The Biblical Recorder has been the organ of the Baptist State Con- 
vention for more than eight years and has sought to be true to its name 



Minutes o-f the 



and faithful to its every duty. The Recorder belongs to the Baptists off 
North Carolina and has a claim upon them that is peculiar to itself. 
While the Convention does not assume any financial obligation (the 
stock belonging ta more than one hundred Baptists in all parts of the 
state) it does name the editor and direct its policy. It is the only paper 
that is absolutely under the control of the Baptist State Convention. 

It is a medium of communication and a great unifying force in our 
denomination. It is the means by which we look upon the fields and 
know the needs in all phases of work at home and abroad. 

This is a reading age and the thought life of our people is determined 
by what they read. There is no way by which we can determine the 
evil effects of bad reading, or the good effects reading good literature. 

It has been found necessary on account of the increased price of 
paper and all other material that goes into the make up of a paper to 
make the price of the Recorder two ($2.00) dollars after Oct. 1st, in- 
stead of one dollar and fifty as it has been for several years. 

We want to urge the pastors and all the brethren and sisters who are 
now subscribers to make every effort possible to add great numbers to 
our subscription list which we find is not larger than it was five years 
ago notwithstanding the great increase in membership throughout the 
State. 

Adjourned until 7:30 p. m. 

THURSDAY— Night Session 

Report on Chri.stian Education by W. L. Poteat of Wake 
Forest as follows: 

CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

Christian Education may be defined as education under Christian 
auspices and Christian control. Two important considerations support it. 

First, religion is the supreme factor in human life. Inasmuch as 
education is the training of the young to lead wholesomely and 
efficiently the life of the race to which they belong, that education 
which does not provide positively for religion is partial and will in the 
end defeat itself. 

Second, the Kingdom of God is the supreme obligation of Christian 
churches. It commands all available resources and agencies. The 
training of the agents on whom the Kingdom must rely for its establish- 
ment and spread is as imperative as the service required of them is 
important. Christian education, therefore, stands alongside evangelism 
and missions on the program of the churches. 

Accordingly, the Baptists of North Carolina have founded and now 



Green River Baptist Association 



conduct 14 higti schools and three coll'eges, two for young women, 
Meredith and Chowan, and one for young men, Wake Forest. The 
aggregate valwe of this property is $1,500,000. The total nwmber of 
students in these Baptist Schools is 4.500. There are eighty ministerial 
students at Wake Forest, 72 of them asking aid. 26 at Louisville from 
North Carolina. And as it is manifest that the Baptists of the State 
h;ave assumed a large part of the burden of educating the young people 
•of the State, and while they recognize the State system of education 
and consider themselves as supplementing it, they insist that the State 
recognize the free service which they are rendering and permit no 
polic}' that would limit or impair that service. 

The Board of Education, with Dr. R. T. Vann as Secretary, is ap- 
pointed by the Baptist State Convention, and it asks all the churches of 
the Green River Association to place Christian Education in the list of 
objects to which they make regular contributions. 

The committee recommends that the churches of the Association con- 
tribute to Christian Education 2-5 of the amount contributed to State 
Missions. 

W. L. POTEAT 
C. T. S. Harrili. 
A. R. Yki.Ton 
Report wos adopted. 
Adjourned, 

FRIDAY— Morning Session 

Devotional exercises conducted by Rev. Roy Lewis. 

Scripture, Acts 17. Prayer by W, R. Bradshaw. 

Read and approved minutes of yesterday. 

Rev. G. A. Martin read order of business for the da}'^ 
which was adopted and followed. 

Welcomed W. R. Bradshaw, representing State Missions^ 
M. L. Kesler representing the Orphanage. 

The following report was read b}^ Rev. A. P. Sorrels on 
State Missions: 

REPORT ON STATE MISSIONS 

Did Jesus command State Mission work ? Have we Apostolic 
example? Does the Holy Spirit insist on its being done? To the first 
questions we answer "yes." State Missions is included in the Com- 
mission as recorded by Matthew, Mark and Luke. 

To the second question we answer "yes" the Apostles gave us 
examples of doing mission work in two ways, ist by emmigration. 
2nd by co-operation. When they left Jerusalem, because of persecution, 



Minutes of the' 



they preached and established churches wherever they located. Then? 
they took collections from these churches in the time of peace andS 
prosperity to aid in the establishing of The Kingdom elsewhere. 

To the third question we answer "j'es" The Holy Spirit's insistance^ 
as well as His assistance, is very noticable in the acts of the Apostles 
and in the epistles written by them. Let us obey the same command,, 
follow the Apostles examples and respond to the Holy Spirits call 
"Carolina for Jesus," 

A. P. S0RREI.S, Chairman Committee 

A- P. Sorrel in his talk urged a eollection or pledges to- 
help pay the indebtedness on the Nebo Church house. Rev. 
G. A. Martin waived this aside and called for Bro. Bradshaw 
to speak to the report. Bradshaw made a fine speech on 
State Missions. 

Rev. J. B. Arledge read report on Orphanage and called 
for Rev. M. L. Kesler to speak on the same. After Kesler's 
speech a collection was taken amounting to $16.07. 

Report on Orphanage as follow^s: 

REPORT ON THOMASVILLE ORPHANAGE 

The great Fatherhood of God has been thoroughly demonstrated in 
the birth life and development of this great institution. 

The cry of a child in the brink of the river Nile broke the heart of a 
heathen Prince. Moses wept and his life was saved and the children of 
Isreal was delivered from Egyptian bondage. 

Not since Christ glorified childhood, has the cry of the child been so 
well understood as it is to-day; the child is here, life was thrust upon 
him, he has rights that we must respect and when he cries for justice 
we must hear and heed. 

Somebody will hear his cry, if Christians do not the devil will; some- 
body must feed and clothe and train the child, if not his friends it will 
be done by his enemies; and he will then render full service to his 
benefactors. 

The Orphanage has sheltered and trained 1702 boys and girls in the 
31 years of its life but it has not been able to hold out the helping hand 
to all the homeless and needy ones who cried for admittance. 

Applications come in at the rate of fifty the month and not a tithe of 
this number can be received. 

The supreme need of the Orphanage is a larger current fund. Our 
present number is 500 with an average cost of $109.09 per child or 30 
cents the day aggregating a total annual cost of $54,545.00. Greater 
economy than this should not be practised but others ought to be ad- 



Green River Baptist Association 



mitted. Destitute children without the necessities of life and with no 
moral training in the world are rapidly passing into manhood and 
womanhood. They cannot be admitted until our current fund is 
sufficient to take care of them. 

Our Orphanage work is constantly being enlarged and still the task 
looms before us as just begun. The work at the Kennedy Home is 
moving along nicely. An excellent crop was made last year with a neat 
profit of $897.25 after paying the yearly rental of $2,000.00 to Mr. 
KeTinedy for the use of the place during his life time. The promise of 
the present crop is good. The most urgent need of the Kennedy Home 
is a suitable chapel for religious service. 

Your committee would again recommend: 

(i) A liberal Thanksgiving offering emphasizing the importance of 
setting apart the income of ONE DAY FOR THE ORPHANAGE by 
every man, woman and child the Association, at or near the Thanks- 
giving time. We urge our churches and pastors to press this work day 
plan with all their power. 

(2) By monthl}' contribution from every Sunday School in this 
Association. This plan not only does more for the cause but it trains 
our people in the grace of giving as perhaps nothing else can. 

(3) That every Sunday School take a club of CHARITY AND 
CHILDREN and keep in touch with our large growing family. 

With the constantly advanceing prices on nearly all of the staple 
articles of living we are running behind from month to month with 
our current expenses. Our present debt is $22,000 with some $12,000 in 
assets and our average daily expenses is $150.00. We are dependent 
upon a large Thanksgiving offering to give us the extra shove as we 
enter upon the winter months. 

The demand of the child upon us is just, it is made so by God; and 
then let us with open hearts and hands of service be loyal to his 
demands. For committee, 

J. B. Arledgr 
W. F. McMahan 
M. H. Hyder 

By motion received Pacolet Church into the Association. 
Recess one hour. 

FRIDAY — Afternoon Session 
Report on Time and Place announced b^^Rev. G. A. Martin. 
REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON TIME AND PLACE 

Time — Thursday before the first Sunday in October, 191 7. 
Pl.\CE— Round 'Hill Church, Union Mills, N. C. 
Introductory Sermon — Rev. G. G. O'Neill. 
Ai^ternaTE— C. T. S. Norville. 



lo Minutes of the 



By motion the Clerk was instructed to insert last year's 
apportionments as the goal for this year with the addition of 
a column for Christian Education, two-fifths the amount of 
State Missions. Rev. Wm. H. Moore spoke to the report on 
Home Missions, foUow^ed by G. G. O'Neill and R. P. Geer. 

Report as follows: 

REPORT ON HOME MISSIONS 

The work of the Home Mission Board is to advance the Kingdom of 
Jesus Christ among the people of our home land, Cuba and the Isle of 
Pines, and Panama. The Home Board officers are located in Atlanta, 
Ga., and in charge of Corresponding Secretary Dr. B. D. Gray, who is 
ably assisted by a Board of capable and consecrated men. The Board 
has employed 1409 workers in mountain schools, enlistment work, 
evangelism, and as missionaries. During the last conventional year 
these workers delivered 186,012 sermons and addresses. They held 828 
meetings and conferences. There were added to our churches by 
baptism 43,792, and by letter and otherwise 27,594, making a total 
number of additions to our churches through the work of the Home 
Mission Board 71,386. These workers also distributed 29.352 Bibles and 
Testaments. They organized 584 Sunday Schools, developed 100 
pastoral fields. Under the influence of these workers 167 churches were 
constituted, 321 houses of worship build and improved, and they had 
1386 volunteers for the ministry and missions. 

We have 34 mountain schools with 177 workers, and 5319 students, 
94 students being trained for the ministry. In these schools last year 
we had 339 additions to our churches by Baptism. This is one of the 
greatest departments of the Home Mission Board work, and should 
appeal especially to the heart of every Christian man and woman in 
this Association. 

The last conventional year of the Home Mission Board was the most 
fruitful of ,all the years of its existance. As an evangelizing agency the 
Home Mission Board's success outstrips that of all other Home Mission 
Boards in America. Our receipts from the States, including Evangelism, 
Total $370,590, while the total the year previous was $387,508, showing 
a falling off last year of $16,918, which together with the enlargement 
of our work brought the Home Board to the last Convention at 
Asheville, N. C, in debt $72,308. This is the debt of every Baptist 
within the bounds of the Southern Baptist Convention, therefore we 
appeal to the members of this Association that we, "Come up to the 
help of the Lord against the mighty." That we, "Study to show our- 
selves approved unto God, a workman that needeth not be ashamed." 



Green River Baptist Association 



We recommend that through our prayers of abounding faith, and an 
incease of not less than lo per cent in our contributions to Home 
Missions, that we strengthen and enlarge the work of the Home 
Mission Board. 

Wm. H. Moore 
J. L. Taylor 
Z. V. Morris 
Round Hill School: 

Four Trustees for Round Hill School were elected, viz 
Rev. G. A. Martin, Chairman, W. F. Flack, B. B. Price and 
W. T. Morgan. 

The committee to apportion the debt on Round Hill School 
reported as follows: 

We recommend that Rutherfordton, Round Hill and Marion try to 
raise an average of J3.00 per male member and that each of the other 
churches try to raise an average of $2.50 per male member. 

Judge M. H. Justice. Chairman 
A. L. Grayson 
J. D. Morris 

TREASURER'S REPORT 

Treasurer's report of running expenses of Round Hill Academy for 
the year 1915-1916. 

STATISTICAL TABLE 

Number of teachers employed . . 6 

Number of students enrolled 133 

Number of graduates 10 

Total Number of graduates to date 70 

credits 

By tuition collected . $2,355.47 

By checks Home Mission Board 

By house and phone rent . 

By heat bill 

Pay entertainments 

Economics department . 

Other credits 

Cash on deposit 

By balance credits 

Total credits . . . I3.581.07 

debits 

Teachers salaries f2,6io.oo 

Balance on last years expense 243.15 



700.00 


143.22 


3970 


67.50 


14.00 


6950 


153.88 


37.80 



12 Minutes of the 



House rent 36.00 

Collecting tuition . . 30.00 

Wood bill ........... 91. 17 

Stove coal , _ 66.00 

Printing 49.33 

Nanney and Morris rent 35 52 

Other expenses 45 '"^6 

Reading matter for Library 1256 

Cash deposited in Bank . 153 88 - 

Cash on incidentals 132.00 

Total debits . . .. , ... $3.505. 47 

J. D. Morris, Treasurer 

Recognized Rev. Elbert Jackson of the Sandy Run 
Association. 

Adjourned till 7:30 p. m. 

FRIDAY— Night Session 

Report on Woman's Work was read by Wm. H. Moore. 
Miss Clara Morris read a good paper on this subject. 

REPORT ON WOHAN'S WORK 

The Woman's Missionary Society has demonstrated its value as a 
factor in the evangelization of the world. The church has come to see 
that she had gone forth to conquest with one hand bound to her side. 
The call of her women from indifference and inactivity into a larger 
Christian service marks an era in her history. 243 new societies were 
reported organized in the State last year making a total of 1316 societies 
actually at work. In these societses were reported 600 tithes, 250 mission 
study classes, gifts amounting to $46,759.95. In the Green River are 16 
societies in 9 churches giving $293.26. 

Your committee earnestly urge that the pastors and delegates of the 
Association encourage the women to organize societies and mission study 
classes in every church for "It will be a great day for the efficiency and 
enlistment of our Southern Baptist forces when there is a Woman's 
Missionary Society in every Baptist Church." 

G. G. O'Neilt. 
E. H. Logan 

Remarks by Wm. H. Moore and G. A. Martin. 

Foreign Mission report and speech b}^ Rev. G. A. Martin: 



Green River Baptist Association 



REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS 

The Foreign Mission Board composed of eighteen local members and 
eighteen State members is located at Richmond, Va., and is addressing 
itself to the task of preaching the gospel to the uttermost part of the 
€arth, 

"God so loved the world that he gave his only begotten Son, that 
whosoever believeth on Him should not perish, but have everlasting 
life." "All power is givec unto me in Heaven and earth, Go ye there- 
fore and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, 
and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost; teaching them to observe all 
things whatsoever I have commanded you, and lo I am with you alway, 
even unto the end of the world." '*Look unto me all ye ends of the 
earth and be ye saved, for I am God and there is none else." There is 
no difference between the Jew and the Greek; for the same Lord over all 
is rich unto all that call upon him. For whosoever shall call upon the 
Lord shall be saved. How then shall they call upon Him in whom" they 
have not believed ? And how shall they believe on Him of whom they 
have not heard ? And how shall they hear without a preacher, and how 
shall they preach except ihey be sent?" If ye love me keep my 
commandments. If ye love me ye will keep my commandments. 

Our gifts to Foreign Missions is the measure of our loyalty to the 
Lord Jesus Christ. If we refuse to give to send the gospel of light and 
life tq save a lost w^orld we deny the Lordship of Jesus and limit his 
presence with us. "You go and I will go with you. You stay and you 
stay alone for I must go." 

Since the time of the Apostles there never has been such a loud and 
insistant world call. Never has there been such a world-wide obligation. 
The great nations of Europe are down in what must prove a death 
struggle to many of them. The rest of the world looks on with horror, 
helpless to render aid or separate them from the throat of each other. 
America must lift up the banner of Christ and lead them back to the 
Prince of Peace. 

The Board is doing work in China, Japan, Africa, Italy, Brazil, 
Argentina and Mexico. The doors are wide open to these white 
harvest fields and from all of them is heard with increasing clearness 
the Macedonian call "Come over and help us." Our God bids us arise 
and .go never fearing, promising to be with us both in Judea, and 
Samaria, and to the ends of the earth. 

Your committee would suggest that all pastors preach on the subject 
of Foreign Missions often, secure and distribute free tracts supplied by 
the Board for the asking amongst their members and our Mission 
Magazine now published by the Sunday School Board, Nashville, Tenn. 

Fraternally submitted, 

G. A. Martin. 
By motion adjourned. 



14 Minutes of the 



SATURDAY— MoRNmG Session 

Devotional exercises by Wm. H. Moore. 

Read and adopted record of yesterday. 

Announcements of Committees: 

Delegates to State Convention — J. L. Taylor, B. B. Price 
and J. D. Moiris. 

Southern Convention — J. M. Walker. 

Associational Member of State Missions — G. A, Martin, 
Rutherfordton, N. C. 

Associational Member of Foreign Missions — Wm. H, 
Moore, Marion, N. C. 

Associational Member of Home Missions — A. P. Sorrels, 
Union Mills, N. C. 

Roport on State of Churches read by F. L. Simmons. 

Report on digest of letters read by J. M. Walker. 

In discussing these reports Rev. J. M. Walker urged the 
payment of the debt on Round Hill School. Then insisted 
that the Trustees make no more large debts without first con- 
ferring with the Association and getting the approval of the 
same. Rev. A. P. Sorrels endorsed this position and insisted 
that the personnel of the Board of Trustees for Round Hill 
School and the Executive Board of Missions should be so 
changed that the same man would not serve on both. 

Rev. G. A. Martin and B. B. Price spoke in justification of 
the present arrangement. The sad part is most of the 
delegates had gone home. 

Reports adopted. 

REPORT ON STATE OF CHURCHES 

We find by comparing the missions as reported in the church letters 
with the apportionments of last year, first; that eight churches gave 
more than asked for; second, three gave what they were asked for; 
third, that thirty three stopped short of their apportionment. Some of 
which gave less than half of their apportionment. Why did so many 
churches fail to reach the goal ? We find an increase in number of 
baptisms. Also that thirteen churches excluded 57 members. 



Green River Baptist Association 



Some churches have what they call "a retired list." We think this a 
good plan. Those who will not work or attend church should not be 
counted with the workers. Most of the churches have Sunday Schools. 
Only a few have Mission Societies. Very few have mid-week prayer- 
meetings. We think the state of the churches is about normal. 

F. L. Simmons, Chairman Committee 
J. L. Taylor 

REPORT ON DIGEST OF LETTERS 

Your Committee is not able to make a full report on account of all 
the church letters not being in. We note that there has been 233 
baptisms this year. This is an increase of 24. We find that there has 
been a gain of over $2,000.00 in contributions. We urge the churches 
to enlarge greatly their contributions to Missions and Pastor's Salary. 

W. A. Harreli, 
W, H. Moore 
J. M. Walker 

Report on Temperance read by J. P. Arledge: 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON TEMPERANCE 

The Committee on Temperance begs to submit the following for your 
consideration: 

Temperance may be said to be right living. Conducting our habits in 
such a way as to strengthen our bodies and moral characters instead of 
tearing them down. Many intemperate things cause only the apparent 
wasting away of our physical bodies, others gnaw at the roots of onr 
morals, and the indulgence in one form will naturally and consequently 
result in the other. When we hear the subject of temperance spoken of, 
our first thought is to retain the traflSc and consumption of intoxicants. 
Why? Because the indulgence in intoxicants deals a direct and im- 
mediate blow to both the physical and moral natures, and the in- 
dulgence of intoxicants excels by far all the other forms of intemperance 
known to man. After looking about us we cannot but come to the one 
conclusion, that is, that to strike at the tap root of our intemperance we 
must have the whiskey traffic stopped entirely, because it is the history 
of the human race to indulge in intoxicants, and the boys of to-day 
have inherited from the race an inborn inclination and desire for strong 
drink, and it is a certainty that if they can't get it, then they cannot 
drink it. We need no high powered microscope to see the vast 
difference in our state as a whole and in our immediate communities 
since the prohibition election of 1908. No one can successfully say that 
prohibition is only a theory and cannot be made practical. 

We want to congratulate the mothers, wives, sisters and daughters of 
state and communities for the noble fight they made to stamp humanities 



1 6 Minutes of the 



greatest curse from the reach of their husbands, fathers, brothers and 
sons. To them we give the praise. 

Again we should be grateful to our Legislature for the untiring 
manner in which they have striven to bar the door against the 
admittance of whiskey into our state. At the last session of the 
General Assembly an act was passed to restrict the shipping of more 
than one quart to one person for a period of 15 days. This has been 
passed upon by our Supreme Court and declared constitutional. Hence, 
it follows, as a natural conclusion, that if we can restrict the receiving; 
of whiskey to an amount of one quart every 15 days, then we can re- 
strict it even further, until we cut it out entirely. Let this be our goal. 

The Lord does not compromise things, and our present system is a 
compromise with whiskey dealing. The great demon of destruction is 
still allowed to edge its way into our midst, even under all our steps 
toward prohibition and destruction goes on with the sanction of many 
Christians destroying the lives and morals of men. In order to save 
our young men we must remove the temptation from them. How ? 

The only remedy is to appeal to those who have the power to remove 
it. Let us as Christians and members of the Baptist Churches compos- 
ing the Green River Association, appoint a committee to draw up a 
petition and present it to be read in our General Assembly to meet in 
the year 1917, asking them to further restrict the admittance of whiskey 
into our state until instead of being allowed to receive a quart every 15 
days that they be not allowed to receive any at all. 

Signed, 

J. P. Arledge 
J. T. Gilbert 

A vote of thanks as follows was tendered to the Columbus 
Church. We, the delegates and visitors attending the Green 
River Association, wish to record our sincere gratitude for 
boundless hospitality and gracious entertainment accorded us 
by the chiirch and community entertaining us. 

COMMITTEE ON SU^D AY SCHOOLS 

Your Committee appointed to group the Association on Sunday 
School Institute work report as follows: 

First Group — Rev. J. M. Walker, Instructor, Columbus, Lynn, 
Hickory Grove, Mill Spring, Pea Ridge, Silver Creek, Mountain View, 
Coopers Gap, Cane Creek, Rock Springs, Big Level. 

Second Group — G. A. Martin, Instructor, Whitesides Valley, Bills 
Creek, Mount Pleasant, Stone Mountain, Montfords Cove, Piney Knob, 
Pleasant Grove, Green Hill, Mountain Creek, Piedmont, Pleasant Hill, 
Rutherfordton. 



Green River Baptist Association 



Third Group— G. G, O'Neill, Instructor, Mt. Vernon, Round Hill, 
Camp Creek, Dysartsville, Macedonia, Glenwood, Bethel, Zion Hill, 
Chapel Hill, Harmony Grove. 

Fourth Group — W. H. Moore, Instructor, Bethlehem, Cherry Springs, 
Old Fort. Clear Creek, Marion, East Marion, Clinchfield, Nebo, 
Halltown, Woodlawn, Turkey Cove, Armstrong, Sunny Vale. 

A. P. Sorrels, Chairman 
G. A. Martin 
J. D. Logan 
J. M. Gibson 
J. M. Walker 

REPORT ON MINISTERIAL EDUCATION 

One of the greatest Christian Statesmen of the present day. Dr. John 
R. Mott, "To secure able men for the Christian Ministry is an object of 
transcendent, urgent, and world-wide concern." 

This is the opinion of a man who has three times journeyed around 
the world and studied the needs of the churches in every land. 

In the business world to-day, the cry is for efficiency, and in our 
churches we need more efficient pastors and leaders — men who are 
called of God, filled with the Spirit, whose minds are well trained. 

One of the Primary objects of the Convention is the education of men 
called of God to the ministry. Many of the men who are answering the 
call are men of small means, and many of them come from the 
mountain section of our own state. 

At the Southern Baptist Convention the statement was made that if a 
circle of 150 miles were drawn around the city of Asheville it would in- 
clude the birth place of rriore than one half of the preachers of the 
Convention. 

We have in Wake Forest College about eighty ministerial students. 
Seventy of this number hope to get aid from the Board. 

At a recent meeting of the Board it was decided to help the young 
women who are preparing to enter the foreign fields. 

These with the students in the Seminary will run the number up to 
about one hundred men and women who are to receive aid. 

Only a few churches of the Green River Association contribute any 
thing to this object. 

The whole Association gives annually only about 135.00. 

We recommend that the Pastors and Sunday School Superintendents 
lay this matter before the churches and Sunday Schools and that at 
least one collection a year be taken for this worthy cause. 

John M. W^alker 

Resolved, that the pastors of the churches of The Green 
River Association be urged to visit the Round Hill School 



Minutes of the 



and spend at least one day and night with the school, faculty, 
and citizens at Union Mills, at least once in each Associational 
year. This resolution was introduced by A. P. Sorrels, and 
unanimously adopted. 

Rev. Roy Lewis preached on Saturday at 2:00 p. m. and 
Rev. A. P. Sorrels preached Sunday at 11:00 A. m. 
Adjourned. 

B. B. Price, Moderator 
A. P. Sorrels, Clerk 



Green River Baptist Association 19 



WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 



The third annual meeting of the Woman's Missionary 
Union (separate from the main Association) of the Green 
River Association met on September 22, 19 16, with Marion 
Baptist Church. 

Devotional services were conducted by Rev. W. H. Moore. 

A hearty welcome was extended to us by Mrs. B. B. Price, 
to which Mrs. N. R. Wells responded. 

A great address on "To-days Opportunity in Mission 
Work; In Foreign Lands, Our Homeland, In Our State," 
was delivered by Rev. W. H. Moore. 

Mrs. G. A. Martin talked to us about "Greater efficiency 
in our Societies; Our Missionary Magazines; Mission Study." 

The Sunbeam Band of Marion Baptist Church gave an 
interesting programme. 

Prayer by Miss Carroll. 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

Song, "Come Thou Almighty King." 

Prayer by Mr. B. B. Price. 

Then the reports of the work during the past year. These 
reports showed greater interest in our work. An increase of 
gifts (amounting to a little more than five hundred dollars 
($500). Great good accomplished thru Personal Service in 
the different communities. The sentiment was that we would 
make next year our best year yet. 

An interesting paper on Young Woman's Auxiliary Work 
was read by Miss Alda Taylor. 

Miss Alda Grayson told us of the work of the lyouisville 
Training School and the needs. 

Miss Carroll, our corresponding Secretary and Treasurer of 
State Executive Committee, showed us the need of the Junior 
organizations. The good it would be for the cause. She 
spoke to us of many helpful things. 

The following officers were elected: Superintendent, Miss 
Clara Morris; Assistant Supt., Mrs. W. T. Morgan; Y. W. 
A. Leader, Miss Fannie Justice; R. A. and S. B. Leader, 
Mrs. J. T. Robinson. 

Our next annual meeting to be held with Mount Vernon 
Baptist Church. Time of meeting to be decided later. 

Hymn, "Blest Be the Tie." Closing prayer by Miss Carroll. 



20 Minutes of the 



CONSTITUTION 



This Association shall be known as the Green River Baptist Associa- 
tion and shall be composed of Baj)tist Churches whose articles of Faith 
and Constitutions are in harmony with those of the Association. 

Each church shall be allowed a representation of two delegates, in 
addition to their regular ordained ministers, and every church of over 
fifty members shall be allowed one additional delegate for every fifty 
additional members. 

The primary objects of the Association shall be to encourage and 
support Wake Forest College, to educate young men called of God to 
the Ministry and approved by the churches to which they belong; to 
encourage education among the people of the State; to support the 
Gospel in the destitute portions of the Slate and of the Southern 
Baptist Convention, to send the Gospel to the Nations that have it not; 
to encourage the distribution and study of the Bible and a sound 
religious literature to assist Baptist Churches in the erection of houses 
of worship, to encourage the proper care of indigent orphan children 
and destitute and aged ministers of the Gospel, to encourage the organi- 
zation and support of Baptist Sunday-Schools; and to co-operate with 
the Baptist State Convention in all its departments of labor. 

The Association shall meet annually on Thursday before the first 
Sabbath in October. 

The officers of the Association shall be a Moderator, Clerk and 
Treasurer, who shall be elected by the Association and continue in 
office until their successors are elected. 

The Moderator shall preside or fill the chair, by calling some member 
of the body thereto, and enforce order in accordance with Mell's 
Parliamentary Practice. 

The Clerk shall record the proceedings, conduct the correspondence, 
and publish and distribute the Minutes. 

The Treasurer shall receive all funds contributed by the churches 
or individuals to the object of the Association, receipting the con- 
tributors for the same; and forward all contributions to their proper 
destination, and make a full report of all receipts and disbursements to 
the Association at its annual session, and on retiring from his office turn 
over to his successor all moneys, papers and books belonging thereto. 

There shall be appointed by the Association at each session a Board of 
Missions and Sunday Schools, consisting of one member from each 
church belonging to the Association and other brethren living in 
Rutherfordton or its immediate vicinity, five of whom shall constitute a 
quorum, which during the intervals between the meetings of the 
Associations, shall have charge of the various interests and objects 



Green River Baptist Association 21 

fostered by the Association, and shall encourage the churches to give 
liberally thereto, and shall make a full report of its work including 
such suggestions relative thereto as it may think advisabl-e to the 
Association at its annual sessions. 

The President, or in case of his d«ath or dis'qualificatiou, any three 
wiembers of the Board may call a meeting thereof. 

This Constitution may be changed or amended at any annual session 
by two-thirds of the representatives voting in the affirmative. 



ASSOCIATION COVENANT 

Article i. We believe in one only and true God, and that there are 
three Persons in the Godhead — the Father, the Son, and Holy Ghost, 
and these are one in Substance, and equal in power and glory. 

Article 2, We believe the Scriptures of Old and New Testaments are 
the Word of God, and the only rule of faith and practice. 

Article 3. We believe in the doctrine of original sin. 

Article 4. We believe in man's impotency to recover himself from 
the fallen state he is in by his own free will and ability. 

Article 5. We believe that sinners are justified in the sight of God 
only through the imputed righteousness of Jesus Christ. 

Article 6. We believe the saints shall preserve in grace, and that they 
never shall finally fall away. 

Article 7. We believe that Baptisms and the Lord's Supper are 
ordinances instituted by Christ and the true believers are the only 
proper subjects thereof. 

Article 8. We believe that immersion is the only Scriptural mode of 
baptism. 

Article 9. We believe that no person has a right to administer the 
ordinances but such as are regularly called and qualified thereto. 

Article 10. We believe in the resurrection of the dead, and a general 
judgment; that the punishment of the wicked shall be everlasting, and 
the joys of the righteous eternal. 

Article 11. We. the members of the Green River Baptist Association, 
agreeing to the above Articles of Faith, do, for and in behalf of the 
churches which we represent, covenant and agree and give ourselves up 
to each other in church and Christian fellowship, in order to keep up 
the unity of the spirit in the bonds of peace, and to assist each other in 
all matters of distress and to pray for each other's prosperity. 



22 Minutes of thk 



ORDER OF BUSINESS 

1. Fix time of meeting and adjournment, 

2. Call for messengers present without letters from their churches. 

3. Call for applications for membership in this body. 

4. Appoint committees on Preaching and Finance. 

5. Recognize, in their official capacity, any present who may repre- 
sent general denominational interests. 

6. Call for correspondents, renewing the call at the opening of each 
morning session. 

7. Appoint committees on State of Churches, State, Home and 
Foreign Missions, Sabbath Schools, Temperance, Education, Orphanage, 
Deceased Ministers, Aged Ministers, Nominations, State and Southern 
Conventions, Place and Introductory Sermon of next Session, Biblical 
Recorder, etc., urging reports as soon as possible. 

8. Miscellaneous business. 

9. Ordered: That this Association at this vSession (1894), appoint a 
suitable man as Historian, whose business it shall be to collect such 
facts as he may be able to do, in reference to our church and associa- 
tional history and report the same annually, until the same shall have 
been completed. 

10. Give an opportunity to present the claims of Foreign, Home 
and State Missions and Orphanage, with any other general interest 
supported by this body, 

11. Fix time and place of next meeting, and appoint the Intro- 
ductory preacher and alternate, also minister to preach the missionary 
sermon. 

12. Arrange general (or union) meetings. 

13. Appoint correspondents to other bodies. 

14. Call for reports of committees. 

15. Elect delegates to State and Southern Baptist Conventions. 

16. Elect Executive Board, provided for in Constitution. 

17. Arrange for printing, distributing minutes and paying Clerk. 

18. Adjourn. 

19. Elect Trustees for Round Hill School. ' 



PASTORS AND THEIR POSTOFFICES 

Arledge, J. B Saluda, N. C. 

Arledge, J. W Harris, N. C. 

Freeman, H. R Henderson, N. C. 

Hamrick, B. M Rutherfordton, N. C. 

Huntley, M. M Rutherfordton, N. C. 

Harrel, Y. D Ellenboro, N. C. 



Green River Baptist Association 23 

Linsey, W. G Campobello, S. C. 

Lowdermilk, D. P Marion, N. C. 

Limrick, R. L Ellenboro, N. C. 

Moore, Wra. H Marion, N. C. 

McMahan, W. F. R. i. Old Fort, N. C. 

Morris, W. A HendersonviUe, N. C. 

Martin, G. A Rutherfordton, N. C. 

Norville, C. T. S Old Fort, N. C, 

O'Neil, G. G Rutherfordton, N. C, 

Ruppe, J. T . Rutherfordton, N. C. 

Right, M. S. . . . Ellenboro, N. C. 

Shuford, M. A Harvard, N. C. 

Sorrels, A. P Union, Mills, N. C. 

Smith. J. H Chesnee, S. C. 

Simmons, F. L Nebo, N. C. 

Walker, J. M Columbus, N. C. 



TREASURER'S REPORT 

State Missions $117.96 

Home Missions 80.74 

Foreign Missions 103.80 

Orphanage 46.75 

Aged Ministers Relief 15.50 

Minute Fund 40.91 

Ministerial Education 4.90 

Sunday School Missions 2.03 

Totals 1412.62 

Respectfully Submitted, 

W. A. Harritx, Treasurer Green River Association 

We approve the above report, 

A.L.Grayson,"! . j.^. ^ 

T. C. Smith j ^"diting Committee 



24 



Minutes of the 






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PLEDGES AND APPORTIONMENTS 



CHURCHES 



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Armstrong 1$ 

Bethel | 

Bethlehem 

Beulah 

Big Level 

Bills Creek 

Camp Creek 

Cane Creek 

Chapel Hill 

Cherry Springs... 

Clear Creek 

Columbus 

Coopers Gap 

Clinchfield 

Dysartsville 

East Marion 

Glenwood 

Green Hill 

Hall Town ...; 

Hickory Grove 

Harmony Grove... 

Macedonia 

Marion 

Montfords Cove... 
Mountain Creek. 

Mill Spring 

Mount Pleasant... 
Mountain View.. 

Mount Vernon 

Nebo 

Old Fort 

Piney Knob 

Pl-easant Grove... 

Pea Ridge 

Pleasant Hill 

Piedmont 

Rock Spring 

Round Hill 

Rutherfordton ... 

Silver Creek 

Stone Mountain . 

Sunny Vale 

Turkey Cove 

Whiteside Valley 

Woodlawn 

Zion Hill 



1.50 I 
2.50 
2.50 
•50 
2.50 

350 
1.50 
2.50 
2.50 
2.50 
2.50 
2.50 
1. 00 
1. 00 
2.00 
1.50 
3-50 
1.50 
125 
1. 00 
450 
2.50 
10.50 
2.00 

550 
2.50 

I 50 
1.50 
5 50 

1-25 

5-50 
1.50 
2.50 
1.50 
2.50 
1.50 
1-25 
5 50 
11.00 
I -50 
I 50 
1. 00 
1. 00 
2.50 
1.25 
1.50 



3.50$ 

18.00 
8.00 
1.50 
2.50 
4.40 
3 50 
125 
550 

12.00 
6.00 

12.00 
2.00 
1. 00 
6.00 
6.00 

10.00 
2.00 
350 
1.50 

11.50 

2.50 

100.00 

20.00 

24.00 

12.00 
1.50 
3.00 

35 00 
350 

30.00 
3.60 
6.00 
3- 50 

12.00 
3.00 

5-55 
48.00 
120.00 
1.50 
1.50 
2.50 
1-50 
350 
2.50 
2.50 



1.40$ 

7.20 

3.20 

.60 
1,00 
1.80 
1.40 

.50 
2.20 
4.80 
2.40 
4.80 

.80 

.60 
2.40 
2.40 
4.00 

.80 
1.40 

.60 
4.60 
1. 00 
40.00' 
8.00 
9.60 
4.80! 

.60 

1.20 

14.00 

1.40 

12.00 

1.40 

2.40 

1.40 

4.80 

1.20 

2.20 

19.20 

48.00 

.60 

.60 
1. 00 

.60 
1.40 
1. 00 
1,00 



Totals $r2o.oo $570.20122830 $473.00 I769.75 $635-75 $2797.00 



2.00 
15.00 
6.00 
1.50 
4.00 
5.00 
4.50 
1.50 
6.50 
2.00 
3.00 
17.00 
2.00 
1. 00 
3.00 
6.00 
5.00 
2.00 
4.50 
1-50 
7-50 
3.00 
93.00 
25 00 
45 00 
5 00 
1.50 
2.50 
3500 
3-50 
15.00 
4.00 
4.00 
2.00 
2.00 
3 00 
1.50 
37.00 
75.00 
1.50 
1.50 
2.50 
1.50 
450 
2.00 
2.00 



% 2.75 

28.00 

13.00 

4.00 

7.00 

12.00 

8.00 

4.00 

7.00 

12.00 

7.00 

15.00 

4.00 

2.00 

10.00 

5 00 

8.00 

2.50 

3-50 

6.50 

11.00 

8.00 

[lO.OO 

27.00 

5500 

14.00 
2.00 

5.50 
5500 

5.00 
25.00 

5 50 
8.00 
3.50 
30.00 
3.00 
6.50 
55 00 
160.00 
4.00 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
550 
2.50 
3.00 



% 300 

15.00 

10.00 

3.00 

3-50 

7.00 

6.00 

6.00 

20.00 

14.00 

13.00 

14.00 

4.50 
3.00 
6.00 
6.00 

15.00 
350 
7.50 
2.00 

13.50 

500 

125.00 

18 00 

36 00 
5.00 
2.00 
350 

25.00 
4.00 

30.00 
3.00 
8.50 
1.50 
7.00 
2.50 
2.25 

20.00 
140.00 
4.00 
1.50 
3.00 
1.50 
7.00 
3.00 
2.00 



14J5 

85.70 

42.70 

11.10 

20.50 

33-70 

24.90 

1575 

43-70 

4730 

33 90 

65 30 

14.30 

8.60 

29.40 

26.90 

45.50 

12.30 

21.65 

13.10 

52.60 

22.00 

478.50 

100.00 

175.10 

43.30 

9.10 

17.20 

169.50 

18.05 

117.50 

18.90 

31.40 

13.40 

58.30 

14.20 

19.25 

184.70 

55400 

13.10 

8.10 

11.50 

7.60 

24.40 

12.25 

12.00 



Eureka combined with Rock Springs 



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MODEL BARBER SHOP 

C V. INAlNrNEY 
UNION MILLS, N.C. 

Agent for Asheville Steam Laundry 

PROTECTION 

Fire Insurance in the most reliable companies 

W. F. FLACK, Agent 
Union Mills, N. C, 

UNION MILLS, N. G. 

Call and get my prices on fancy groceries. 
Will exchange for country produce at best 
market prices. 

J. L. BARNES 

UNION MILLS, N. C. 

I am located at depot and can give best prices on 
general merchandise and exchange for your produce. 
See my samples of made to order clothing. 

FLACK BROTHERS 

AT VEIN MOUNTAIN 

Will treat you right on merchandise and produce 
If you die, we make a specialty on burial fixtures 



Union Mills, N. C. 

UNDER THE CONTROL OF THE GREEN RIVER ASSOCIATION 

AND THE HOME MISSION BOARD OF THE 

SOUTHERN BAPTIST CONVENTION 

The aim of the school is to train the young men and 
young women of this and nearby Associations for active 
Christian life. ^ The development of character is given 
primary attention. To this end the Trustees have em- 
ployed college graduates of high moral character and who 
are specialists in the courses they teach. They have the 
interest of your young men ^nd young women at heart 
and spare no efforts to help them in all their work. 

The cost is very low. We know of no other school that 
gives the same at such a low cost. 

The Spring Term opens Jan. 2, 1917 

The Fall Term of 1917 opens the third week 
in August 

You will do well to investigate. This is the place for 
the young men and young women of the Green River 
Association. 

For further information and a catalog, write to either 

J. E. HOYLE, Principal or 

MISS EUNICE BENTON, Lady Principal 



Ak; 



MINUTES 

OF THE 

SEVENTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL SESSION 

OF THE 

GREEN RIVER 
BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

HELD WITH 

ROUND HILL BAPTIST CHURCH 

UNION MILLS, N. C. 

OCTOBER 4, 5, 6 and 7, 1917 



OFFICERS 



]UDGn M. U. JVSriCE, Moderator . . . . Rutherfordton, N. C. 

REV. G. A. MARTIN, Vice-Moderator Marion, N. C. 

REV. A. P. SORRELS, Clerk Union Mills, N. C. 

BRO, M. H. JONES, Treasurer . Rutherfordton, N. C. 



Next Session will be held with the Church at Piedmont, Ruth- 
erford County, N. C, beginning on Thursday before the First 
Sunday, in October, 1918. 



MINUTES 

OF THE 

SEVENTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL SESSION 

OF THE 

GREEN RIVER 
BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

HELD WITH 

ROUND HILL BAPTIST CHURCH 

UNION MILLS, N. C. 

OCTOBER 4, 5, 6 and 7, 1917 



OFFICERS 



JUDGE M. H. JUSTICE, Moderator . . . . . Rutherfordton, N. C. 
REV. G. A. MARTIN, Vice-Moderator , ... . . . Marion, N. C. 

REV. A. P. SORRELS, Clerk Union Mills, N. C. 

BRO. M. H. JONES, Treasurer . . . ... . Rutherfordton, N. C. 



Next Session will be held with the Church at Piedmont, Ruth- 
erford County, N, C, beginning on Thursday before the First 
Sunday, in October, 1918. , 



LIST OF ORDAINED MINISTERS. 

Resident Pastor, marked, "R. P." Non-resident Pastors, marked, 
"N. P." 

R. P. Eld. Arledge, J. B Saluda, N. C. 

R. P. Eld. Arledge, T. W Harris, N. C. 

Eld. Denton, J. R Dysartsville, N. C. 

R. P. Eld. Drake, T. A Nebo, N. C. 

N. P. Eld. Freeman, H. R Fruitland, N. C. 

N. P. Eld. Hamrick, B. M Rutherf ordton, N. C. 

N. P. Eld. Huntley, M. M Rutherf ordton, N. C. 

N. P. Eld. Huntley, F. J Bear Wallow, N. C. 

Eld. Haynes, W. L Uree, N. C. 

R. P. Eld. Hodge, J. L Rutherfordton, N. C. 

N. P. Eld. Harrill, Z. D Ellenboro, N. C. 

N. P. Eld. Linsey, W. G Gampo Bello, N. C. 

Eld. Laughter, B. C Mills Spring, N. C. 

N. P. Eld. Lumes, A. P Landrum, N. C. 

R. P. Eld. Lowdermilk, D. P Marion, N. C. 

N. P. Eld. Limrick, R. L Ellendoro, N. C. 

R. P. Eld. McKaughan, J. A. Rutherfordton, N. C. 

N. P. Eld. McDaniel, T. C Cliffside, N. C. 

R. P. Eld. Martin, G. A Marion, N. C. 

R. P. Eld. McMahan, W. F Old Fort, N. C. 

Eld. Mashburn, A. B Nealsville, N. C. 

N. P. Eld. Morris, W. A Hendersonville, N. C. 

R. P. Eld. Norville, C. T. S Rutherfordton, N. C. 

N. P. Eld. Nanney, Grady Cliffside, N. C. 

N. P. Eld. O'Neal, G. G Rutherfordton, N. C. 

N. P. Eld. Ruppe, J. T Rutherfordton, N. C. 

R. P. Eld. Sorrels, A. P Union Mills, N. C. 

N. P. Eld. Smith, J. H Cherokee, S. C. 

R. P. Eld. Simmons, F. L Nebo, N. G. 

Eld. Snypes, M. V Nebo. N. C. 

N. P. Eld. Synclair, Joe Rutherfordton, N. C. 

Eld. Weaver, G. H Nebo, N. C. 

N. P. Eld. Walker, J. M Campobello, N. C. 

N. P. Eld. Wright, N. L Rutherfordton, N. C. 

EXECUTIVE BOARD OF MISSIONS. 

Elder G. A. Martin, Chairman Marion, N. C. 

Elder J. A. McKaughan Rutherfordton, N. C. 

Bro. R. P. Geer Rutherfordton, N. C. 

Bro. W. A. Harrills Rutherfordton, N. C. 

Bro. J. D. Morris Union Mills, N. C. 

Bro. B. B. Price Marion, N. C. 

Bro. R. Ledbetter Uree, N. C. 

TRUSTEES ROUND HILL SCHOOL 

G. A. Martin, Chairman Marion, N. C. 

J. D. Morris, Secretary .Union Mills, N. C. 

A complete list of trustees will be furnished the secretary when 
the churches report. 



CHURCHES AND DELEGATES NAMED. 

Bethel — J. D. Mashburn, W. C. Raburn, M. C. Morgan, J. H. Morris. 

Bethlehem — Bruce Parker, John Lail, James M. Gibson, Alford T. 
Gibson. 

Beulah — R. P. Pitman, John Culbreth. 

Big Level — W. J. Wilson, O. L. Wilson, Grover Green. 

Bills Creek— J. C. McDaniel, W. M. Flynn, J. T. Jackson. 

Camp Creek — Eddie Morehead, Zolan Clements, Glen Barnes. 

Cane Creek — B. E. Hanes, R. B. Biddy, C. W. Searcy, J. T. Harris. 

Chapel Hill— Charles Poteat, John Greer, Albert Poteat, Earnest 
Corpening. 

Cherry Spring — Clarence Gilliam, Stanley Robertson, James Gil- 
liam, J. W. Ross. 

Clear Creek— G. B. Woody, Melvin Patton, Lee Quinn, W. D. Long. 

Columbus— J. T. Gilbert, N. T. Mills, H. W. Hill. 

Coopers Gap — J. W. Biddy, J. L. Jackson, J. R. Blanton, R. L. Blan- 
ton. 

Clinchfield— J. P.^Rumfelt, T. E. Poteat. 

Dysartsville — L. G. Price, W. N. Laughridge, R. P. Sisk, P. C. Smaw- 
ley. 

East Marion — R. E. Lowdermilk, T. D. Flack, G. C. Dickson. 

Glenwood — E. S. Brown, Otto Marlow. 

Green Hill — J. A. Rucker, J. P. Jones, J. M. McGinnis. 

Hall Town — 

Harmony Grove — ^W. W. Huskins, J. A. Hensley, F. O. Simmons. 

Hickory Grove — Landram McEntire, Walter Powell, J. C. Stott. 

Macedonia — J. A. Gallion, B. T. Gallion, J. T. Wise, H. S. Taylor. 

Marion — J. A. Ruth, B. B. Price, W. T. Morgan, W. L. Furgeson. 

Mill Spring — Frank Jackson, Lawson Walker, N. Champion. 

Monfords Cove— J. W. Halford, J. A. Wilkerson, L. D. Hemphill, S. 
R. Hall, E. Parker. 

Mt. Creek— M. B. Flack, A. F. Geer, L. Johnson, J. W. McDaniel. 

Mt. Vernon — G. E. Morgan, F. O. Lewis, C. J. Ross, Craton Wells, 
Grady Freeman. 

Mt. View— D. J. Hallford, H. H. McCraine, H. D. Jackson. 

Mt. Pleasant— E. W. Hill, J. T. Bland. 

Nebo — G. D. Tailor, J. M. Tyler, T. E. Stone. 

Old Fort— J. S. Bradley, R. F. Hughes, J. B. Nicholes. 

Piney Knob — M. R. Camp, J. D. Bland, E. H. Melton, P. L. Hensley. 

Pleasant Hill— D. C. Nanney, F. J. Harton, Will Taylor, W. J. Tay- 
lor,- Robert Davis. 

Pleasant Grove— H. B. Elliott, A. H. Lynch, R. Ledbetter, M. C. 
Blanton. 

Pearidge — H. W. Russell, Collett Fowler, V. B. Hyder, 

Piedmont— E. P. White, J. T. Hill, W. M. Griswold, J. H. Rollins. 

Packolet — 

Rock Spring — G. W. Whiteside, J. A. Lattimore, Knox Williams. 

Round Hill — W. M. Nanney, J. W. Nanney, J. L. Barnes, J. C. Alley, 
John Bates, W. S. Freeman, C. J. Flack. 

Rutherfordton — R. P. Geer, J. L. Taylor, M. L. Edwards, M. H. Jus- 
tice, H. P. Green, A. D. Smith, C. W. Keeter, Oliver Hill 

Stone Mountain — 

Silver Creek — ^Vance Thompson, Monroe Sane, Rese Arledge. 

Sunny Vail — 

Turkey Cove — 

Whiteside Valley — F. L. Shitle, Giulford Nanney, J. A. Frady. 

Woodlawn— Wade Hollifleld, J. R. Baxter, Harve Huskins. 

Zion Hill— J .M. Pendergrass, T. W. Pendergrass. 



Minutes of the 



PROCEEDINGS 



Union Mills, N. C, Oct. 4, 1917. 

The Green River Baptist Association convened v^ith the 
Round Hill Baptist church at eleven a. m. today. 

The annual sermon wsls preached by Rev. G. G. O'Neal. 
Subject, "The Powder and Work of God." The speaker 
show^ed clearly that God's power and w^ork reaches its cli- 
max in the saving of man through Jesus "The Christ." 

The former moderator being absent Rev. G. A. Martin, 
pastor of the Marion church, and vice moderator of the 
association, called the meeting to order. 

Rev. A. P. Sorrels, the former clerk, called the role of del- 
egates reported on the letters from the churches. Tv^enty- 
eight churches were found represented. Votes for modera- 
tor, clerk, and treasurer were taken by ballot, without nomi- 
nations. When the votes were counted, Judge M. H. Jus- 
tice received a majority for moderator; Rev. A. P. Sorrels 
received a majority for clerk, and M. H. Jones received a 
majority for treasurer. It was understood that the one 
receiving next highest would be vice moderator. In this 
way Rev. G. A. Martin was elected. Rev. G. A. Martin in- 
troduced T. A. Drake and J. A. McKaughan, new pastors. 

Welcomed C. J. Thompson representing "Biblical Re- 
corder," C. C. Smith representing ministerial relief, I. M. 
Mercer representing Orphanage and State Missions. Rec- 
ognized C. J. Woodson of Kings Mountain Association, G. 
B. Pruitt, M. M. Huntly, B. M. Hamrick, J. M. Walker of 
the Sandy Run Association. Announced committee on pro- 
gram, viz.: G. A. Martin, J. A. McKaughan. Recess, one 
hour. 

2 P. M.— AFTERNOON SESSION 

Prayer by C. J. Woodson. Report on Ministerial Relief 
was read by F. L. Simmons. Remarks were made by G. C. 
Smith, G. A. Martin, B. M. Hamrick, F.L. Simmons, G. G. 
O'Neal, and John Smith. On motion the report was adopted. 



Green River Baptist Association 



REPORT ON MINISTERIAL RELIEF. 

Aged ministerial relief fund is one phase of our denominational 
work that has been greatly neglected in the Green River Associa- 
tion, and in the State at large. 

We find no record of report on this object in last year's minutes. 
But we find in the financial table of our 1916 minutes that this As- 
sociation paid the frivolous sum of $75.66 to this object. The aver- 
age amount per church from these figures is only $1.58. 

There are 36 beneficiaries in the State. This number received 
$4,300. Thus making his yearly support a fraction over $100.00 per 
year. 

1st. We urge that the amount pledged for ministerial relief be 
increased at least ten per cent. 

2nd. That each pastor in the Green River Association preach 
a special sermon on this subject which is so greatly neglected. 

3rd. That the Sunday School one day during the year take a 
special collection for ministerial relief. 

REV. F. L. SIMMONS 
REV. W. A. HARRILL 
REV. R. LEDBETTER 

M. L. Edwards read report on Orphanage. On motion 
to adopt said report, remarks were made by I. M. Mercer, 
G. A. Martin, and M. L. Edwards. A collection for the 
Orphanage was taken and amounted to $12.15. 

REPORT ON THOMASVILLE ORPHANAGE. 

On November 11, 1885, the doors of Thomasville Orphanage were 
first opened for the reception of orphan children. For the past 
thirty-two years this wonderful institution has been a great bless- 
ing to the orphan children of North Carolina. This institution, 
within this time, has cared for, trained, educated and fitted for 
life's work and for the discharge of their mission in the world, 
17,094 children. 

There are at this time, about 510 children in the home who are 
being cared for, trained and educated largely by the free-will of- 
ferings of the Baptist people of North Carolina. 

The good accomplished by this institution cannot be measured 
in dollars and cents, for that which it accomplishes is more val- 
uable than silver and gold. It is, and has been for these many 
years serving those who would otherwise be lost to themselves and 
to the State, making great men and women of them. They would 
otherwise be dwarfed and their lives be a matter of insignificance 
and failure. But the great good of this institution can be wonder- 
fully augmented if we, the Baptist people of North Carolina will 
but see, realize and fully appreciate its needs, and then in a he- 
roic, Shristian like manner discharge our duty in meeting and 
relieving these needs. 

About fifty applicants per month are turned away from this in- 
stitution for the want of room and for the lack of funds and equip- 
ment with which to take care of them. Many of these precious 
little ones are just as worthy and just as capable as those who are 
received. Those who are turned away are the precious jewels, and 



Minutes of the 



the beautiful flowers which the poet referred to when he wrote 
these lines: 

"Full many a gem of purest ray serene, 
The dark unfathomed caves of ocean bear 
Full many a flower is born to blush unseen 
And waste its sweetness on the desert air." 

It has been the custom of the orphanage to receive children be- 
tween the ages of tow and twelve years, and to dismiss them 
whenever they are properly prepared to flght the battles of life. 
And it has been the purpose of this institution at all times to fully 
equip those going out from it for lifes' work, and to win in the 
conflict. What a pity therefore, that this institution is not able 
to receive all who knock with anxious hearts at its doors. It 
should be the earnest desire of every Baptist to fully appreciate 
and understand the great good which this institution is doing, and 
to more abundantly provide for its needs. Let us therefore, pur- 
pose in our hearts that this institution shall not lack for anything 
which may be necessary to enable it to accomplish its full pur- 
pose. 

The cost per year of supporting one child in the home has been 
about $110.00, but is now perhaps $135.00. 

The institution at this time, is in need of a chapel for religious 
services at the Kennedy Home, which is located in Lenoir County. 
It is also in need of a more up-to-date printing press to be used in 
the printing department, from which we receive Charity and Cihl- 
dren, one of the nicest and best little papers published in North 
Carolina. 

It also needs additional books for its library. And a swimming 
pool is not only desired, but is a necessity for the use of the chil- 
dren. And last but not least, additional accommodations and more 
commodious ones should be provided, enabling the institution to 
receive greater numbers, and thereby extend its work and accom- 
plish more for humanity and for the kingdom. 

Are we, the people of the Green River Baptist Association, do- 
ing our full duty to meet the needs of the orphanage? This is a 
personal question for each and every church, and for each and every 
Baptist in this association. 

Those in charge of the home report the greatest success of the 
institution during the past year. The health of the children has 
been exceedingly good. Not a single death has occurred within 
its walls. No epidemics of a serious nature have spread amongst 
the children. In fact, the past year has b en a successful one. The 
indebtedness of the institution has been removed. But the cost 
of living and the other expenses in connection with the institution 
have increased wonderfully, and to meet this additional expense 
more money must be raised. If the other demands above recited 
are to be met, a much larger sum than has heretofore been con- 
tributed, must be set apart by the Baptist people of North Caro- 
lina for this institution. 

Out of about two thousand Sunday Schools in North Carolina, 
only about seven hundred contribute to Thomasville Orphanage. 
This is a sad state of affairs to exist, and how to meet this condi- 
tion and to overcome it, is one of the problems that might well be 
discussed by this association. It is true, however, that a major 



Green River Baptist Association 



part of the contributions received by the orphanage come from the 
Sunday Schools. 

An examination of the Minutes of the Green River Baptist As- 
sociation do not show the increase in contributions to Thomasville 
Orphanage which we would like to see. 

In 1907, the contributions of this association for the orphanage 
amounted to $418.96. Five years later, in 1912, we find the con- 
tribution to the orphanage amounted to only $417.96. In 1916, four 
years later, the Minutes show the contributions to the orphanage 
amounted to only $635.75. 

We therefore, most earnestly recommend that every church in 
the Green River Association have an all-year Sunday School. And 
where Sunday Schools are not conducted, that a special effort be 
made to have one organized, and each church impressed with the 
importance of maintaining its Sunday School for the entire year, 
for it is a matter of record that the contributions to the orphanage 
largely come from the Sunday Schools. 

We also recommend that each Sunday School set apart the col- 
lection of one Sunday in each month for the orphanage. And that 
any church which should not have a Sunday School, have regular 
and stated times for taking orphanage collections. 

We also recommend that Thanksgiving Day be made Orphanage 
Day where the people will attend a Thanksgiving service, and 
that a special collection be taken on this day for the orphanage. 
And that the Sunday coming nearest to Thanksgiving Day be set 
apart as Orphanage Day by the churches where Thanksgiving ser- 
vices will not be had on Thanksgiving Day, and that the people 
be urged at these Thanksgiving services, to contribute at least one 
days' wages, or the income of one day, to the orphanage. 

We further recommend, that the pastors and Sunday School su- 
perintendents on Orphanage Day, call to the attention of the Sun- 
day Schools and churches the fact that the collection for that day 
is for the orphanage; and that they briefly state a few of the needs 
of the orphanage and the importance of a liberal contribution. 

Charity and Children being the official organ of Thomasville Or- 
phanage, and one of the sources of revenue of this institution; and 
one of the means by which the children are trained and taught, 
and at the same time made to earn something for themselves and 
the institution, we therefore, recommend that every Sunday School 
have a Charity and Children Club so that this most valuable little 
paper may be read by the Baptist children and they benefited, and 
the institution helped thereby. And that the ministers of the as- 
sociation supplying churches where no Sunday Schools exist, be 
urged to solicit subscriptions from time to time for this paper. 
_ In conclusion, your committee would impress upon the associa- 
tion the very important truth that money invested in the upbuild- 
ing, training and development of the children of our country is 
the best use to which the same can be put. 

It has been said, "That those who love us and are helped by us, 
will remember us when forget-me-nots are withered. And by help- 
ing others, we carve our names on hearts, and not on marble." 

"It is what we have wrought into character during life that we 
can take away with us." No greater opportunity is afforded to 
build character, up-lift humanity and develop Christ's kingdom, 
than by helping the orphan children. 



Minutes of the 



"Humanity is the crowning of history and the realization of 
poetry. The free and living bond which unites all nature to that 
God Who created it for Himself." 

Respectfully submitted, 
M. L. EDWARDS, Chairman 
J. L. TAYLOR 
T. M. HEMPHILL 

Committee. 

This report was amended by appointing M. L. Edwards, chair- 
man of a committee composed of the superintendent of each Sun- 
day School, to make up a car load (more or less) of such things 
as they need or can use at the orphanage, and ship it to Thomas- 
ville. CLERK. 

The moderator announced committees on the different ob- 
jects. Their names will appear on the reports. By mo- 
tion, adjourned. 

NIGHT SESSION. 7 :30 P. M. 

Rev. T. A. Drake led the Association in prayer. Rev. 
G. A. Martin introduced Professor Warlick, principal of 
Round Hill School, who made a few remarks about said 
school. 

Rev. J. M. Walker read report on State Missions. Re- 
marks were made by I. M. Mercer of Thomasville, to the 
edification and delight of all present. Short talks by C. J. 
Woodson, J. M. Walker, and G. A. Martin. Report was 
adopted by rising vote. 

REPORT ON STATE MISSIONS. 

The primary object of State missions is to plant a church in 
reach of every family in the State. In most of its territory it has 
succeeded wonderfully well. With the exception of the new towns 
that spring up over night around our manufacturing centers there 
are but few sections where there is a real need of a new Baptist 
church in this great section of country. That is not so true of the 
East. In that end of the State there are vast reaches of unoccu- 
pied territory, rich in agricultural possibilities, destined to be the 
greatest trucking section on all the Atlantic Seaboard. In this 
end we must still build church houses for years to come. 

The task in the Piedmont belt and our own great section is not 
so much one of evangelization as enlightenment that will enlist the 
great numbers of saved men and women in the work of giving the 
Gospel to all the world. We had last year a reported membership 
of 277,837 divided amongst 2,143 churches who gave $234,262.96 to 
Convention objects. This was a gain of more than $26,000 over 
last year, for which we thank God and take courage. But lest we 
be over-elated let us hasten to remind you that that is but an 84 
cents per capita contribution for Kingdom work. The 5,000 mem- 
bers of the Green River association gave last year $13,561 to all 



Green River Baptist Association 



objects, less than 30 cents per capita, and less than one cent a 
year for State missions. It is the opinion of your committee that 
we need to stress missions till this state of affairs is changed to 
something more worthy of blood-bought, Spirit-born heirs of God. 
We do not be'iieve that He can say to us, "Well done, good and 
faithful servant," when 3,819 members contribute only $5,324, the 
other $8,237 being contributed by less than 1,160 members. 3,819 
members contributed the princely sum of $144 to State missions 
last year. We recommend an increase this year. 

G. A. MARTIN, Chairman 

T. A. DRAKE 

C. F. KEETER 

Committee. 

By motion adjourned. 

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5, 9:30 A. M. 

Rev. M. M. Huntley conducted devotional exercises, by 
reading Scripture and calling on Rev. A. P. Sorrels for 
prayer. 

The clerk read record of yesterday's proceedings. By 
motion it was adopted. 

Report of committee on order of business for the day v^as 
received. First on the report, ''Sunday Schools." W. T. 
Morgan v^rote on this subject and M. L. Edv^ards read the 
report. An amendment, adding last year's grouping of 
churches for Sunday School institute v\^ork w^as made v^ith 
some changes. Talks v^ere made by M. L. Edv^^ards, and 
G. B. Pruitt. By motion the report v^as adopted. 

SUNDAY SCHOOL REPORT. 

Tlie importance of tlie Sunday School work should be weighed 
certainly by no lighter scale than our love for our own, and our 
neighbor's children, and our concern in their salvation, and nothing 
else can take the place of the Sunday School, and the hearts, and 
the actual presence, where it is possible to attend, of every man, 
woman and child, in it. 

Great progress is being made throughout the State, generally. 

In 1897 there were 914 Sunday Schools in the State with an en- 
rolled membership of 66,046. In 1916 there were 2,123 schools with 
an enrollment of 221,148. 

For ten years the average increase in enrollment in the state has 
been about 10,000. 

In our association, according to reports from 37 churches in 
1916, the enrollment was smaller, by 380 than in the 36 churches 
reporting in 1915. 

While throughout the state there is a wide awake and growing 
enthusiasm along all progressive lines of the work, teacher training, 
improved buildings and equipment, a religious census to reach the 
people, the grading of the schools, the organization of home depart- 



lo Minutes of the 



ments, buying workers' libraries and evangelistic campaigns to 
reach the lost, in our association we do not seem to be keeping 
pace with the rest of the States. Some features of the work is, 
of course, more difficult in rural districts, such as most of our 
churches occupy. But can we afford to fall below the average? 
Upon an average, throughout the State, there are 80 in Sunday 
School for every 100 church members. In our association it ap- 
pears, from reports of 1915 and 1916, that we have only about half 
the number in Sunday School that we have n church members. In 

1915, 36 of our 4 6churches reported on Sunday Schools, and in 

1916, 37 of our 47 churches reported, and these reports showed 
fewer baptisms from the Sunday schools in 1916 than was shown 
in 1915. 

We would not sound a note of discouragement, but we must open 
our eyes to the truth. Only 134 baptisms from an enrollment in our 
Sunday schools of 2,794 — mostly children we may well blush to 
have to confess — was our report last year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. T. MORGAN 

Other members of the committee failed to sign and I have lost 
their names. 

This report was amended by inserting last year's grouping of 
the churches for institute work. 

First Group — J, M. Walker, instructor; Columbus, Lyon, Hickory 
Grove, Mill Spring, Pearidge, Silver Creek, Mountain View, Coop- 
er's Gap, Rock Spring, Big Level. 

Second Group — J. A. McKaughan, instructor; Whiteside Valley, 
Bills Greek, Mount Pleasant, Stone Mountain, Montford's Cove, 
Piney Knob, Pleasant Grove, Green Hill, Mountain Creek, iPedmont, 
Pleasant Hill, Rutherfordton, Mt. eVrnon, Round Hill, Camp Creek. 

Third Group — G. G. O'Neil and A. P. Sorrels, managers; Dysarts- 
ville, MaceTionia, Harmony Grove, Glenwood, Chapel Hill, Bethel, 
Zion Hill, Montfords Cove, Bethlehem, Cherry Springs, Old Fort. 

Fourth Group — G. A. Martin, instructor; Marion, Clear Creek, 
Sunny Vale, Turkey Cove, Woodlawn, Hall Town, Nebo, Clinchfield, 
East Marion. A. P. SORELS, Clerk. 

Second on the program, "Home Missions." 

Rev. J. M. Walker read this report, and made a good 

speech on Home Missions. He was followed by G. A. 

Matirn and J. A. McKaughan. 

By motion the report was adopted. 

HOME MISSION REPORT. 

Our Home Mission Board at Atlanta, Georgia, has the distinction 
of reporting yearly more converts and baptisms through the work 
of its missionaries than have ever been reported by another Home 
Mission oBard in America, though several of these expend more 
money than our oBard does. 

Our Board last year reported 37,724 baptisms, 22,945 of which 
were creditable directly to Home Missions, while the rest were 
creditable to co-operative agencies. Last year the total receipts 



Green River Baptist Association ii 



costs were $22,638, or only 4.7 per cent. This suggests great econ- 
omy in administration. While we applaud a wise economy, we 
must not forget that efficiency in secular business has nearly al- 
ways required considerably larger administrative costs than this. 

Our Board must not only wisely expend money; it mtist aid in 
nurturing and instructing the sources of its supply, which are 
among nearly 3,000,000 aBptists, most of whom belong to churches 
with only once-a-month preaching by absentee pastors. To do this 
service with any real effectiveness will necessitate some expens. 
W would encourage our Board in incurring expenses required for 
efficiency. 

The great world war is a challenge to every moral and spiritual 
resource in America. Hundreds of thousands of homes will expe- 
rience a new soul-hunger, a new sense of need, in the giving of 
their sons to fight in the nation's armies for justice and democracy. 
The American farmer must feed the world. The farmer's church, 
already in need of inspiration and new methods that it may serve 
a new rural world, must be the center from which the farmer shall 
gain added understanding and courage to do his part for God and 
for country. Southern Baptists must do their full share to save and 
to serve the religious needs of our American boys in the camps, 
and to protect them from the foul birds of prey that gather in the 
wake of every army. 

Realizing that new and heavier burdens must in this crisis be 
borne by Baptists of the South in the Home Mission Field, the 
Southern Baptist Convention at New Orleans instructed the Board 
to pursue its work on the basis of an apportionment of $505,193, 
and the annual meeting of the Board in June planned the year's 
work on that basis. It is the first time Southern Baptists have un- 
dertaken to raise half a million for Home Missions, but the abound- 
ing needs and opportunities call for it. Our aBptists people are 
prosperous. They can enjoy their prosperity without moral de- 
terioration only by serving God and country and men with their 
substance. aPtriotism and true religion call us to a large support 
of Home Missions. 

In Evangelism and Church Building and Enlistment, in Cuba and 
Panama and the Southern Highlands, among Foreigners and Ne- 
groes and Indians, through co-operative missions in such needy 
States as New Mexico and Arkansas and Oklahoma and Louisiana 
and Florida, in cities and towns and country-side, our Board has 
a great work, and the pressing needs which grow out of the war 
are in addition. 

We recommend — 

1. That earnest prayer be made for the work of the Home Mis- 
sion Board and that our pastors be asked to preach at least once 
during the year upon Home Missions. 

2. That this Association accept its apportionment for Home 
Missions as suggested by our State body, and that we apportion 
this amount among our churches, (through the executive commit- 
tee or a special committee) and publish the apportionment in our 
minutes. 

3. That our churches be encouraged to form mission study 
classes in "Baptist Missions in the South" and "Country Church 
in the South," the two unusually popular mission study books of 
the Home Board. Also that our churches should order and make 



12 Minutes of the 



a larger use of the full and interesting lot of tracts about each 
phase of the work of the Board. The tracts are free on applica- 
tion. The books are, each, cloth 60 cents, paper 40 cents. All or- 
ders for literature or books should be directed to Publicity De- 
partment, Baptist Home Mission Board, Atlanta, Georgia. 

Respectfur.y submitted, 
JOHN M. WALKER 
A. H. NANNEY 
R. P. GEER 

Third on the order of business, ''Foreign Missions." 
This report was read by J. A. McKaughan. Addresses 

were made by him and R. P. Geer. By motion the report 

was adopted. 

FOREIGN MISSIONS. 

We should be profoundly greatful to God for his rich blessings 
upon our Foreign Mission work, both on the fields of labor and in 
the churches at hme. 

Notwithstanding the fact of the unexampled chaos into which 
the world has been thrown by the terrible war, and the unsettled 
social, economic, political and religious conditions which this world 
catastrophy brought about, our Southern Baptist won the greatest 
victory in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and sixteen, for 
Foreign Missions in our noble history. 

Achievements. 

The record of the wonderful achievements on our Foreign fields 
is full of inspiration and encouragement, and should lead us to 
deeper consecration to Foreign Missions, and to make larger gifts 
for the enlargement of the work and the evangelization of the 
world. The rich blessings of God have been bestowed upon the 
faithful workers on the several Foreign Mission fields. The statis- 
tics show that during the Conventional year, from May 1, 1916, 
to April 30, 1917, the greatest results have been realized in the long 
history of the Foreign Mission Board; 6,347 converts have been 
baptized, and a number of new churches have been organized. The 
work of education and the publication has been greatly blessed. 

The saving work of the Gospel and the Holy Spirit attends every 
increased effort of Southern Baptist to proclaim the Gospel to the 
unsaved nations, and put them under obligation to put forth every 
effort to evangelize the world. 

Finances. 

The Board received last year $749,140.52, including the amount 
paid on the debt, which was $180,000, for its general work, and in- 
cluding the work of the Judson Centenial a total of $961,970.48. 

It may be a matter of special interest to us to know that 90 7-lOc 
of every dollar given to Foreign Missions actually reached the 
missionaries on the foreign fields, and 9 3-lOc were required to 
meet all home expenses. Thus we see that the Foreign Mission 
Board renders account of its stewardship and practices the very 
best business methods in the management of the money entrusted 



Green Riner Baptist Association 13 



to it. No business firm could do such a large business, on such 
a large territory, on less expense. 

Needs of the Work. 

The work of Foreign Missions has great and absolute needs. It 
is a fact that the Foreign Mission Board can not successfully meet 
the conditions and needs of the work on the foreign fields already 
entered unless there is an increase in gifts to oFreign Missions. 
This is a time of Baptist opportunity. In many ways God is call- 
ing on Southern Baptist to make a great advance in Foreign Mis- 
sion work. We have done well in the past, but world conditions 
are opening up to us the greatest opportunity we as Baptist have 
ever faced. The day in which we live is the greatest in human 
history for the cause of Christ. A new era of democracy and 
brotherhood seems close at hand. With the growth of democracy 
and freedom, which the present world conditions promise, the 
Baptist have an opportunity through wise leadership and the con- 
secration of themselves and their means to establish the truthful- 
ness of their cause — the Lordship of Jesus Christ among the na- 
tions of the world. These conditions should call the hosts of our 
Baptist Zion to their knees in earnest prayer, and to greater sac- 
rifice and service, inspired as we are with the hope that the king- 
doms of this world are to become the kingdom of Christ our Savior 
and Lord. 

Recommendations. 

Your Committee earnestly recommends: 

First — That the pastor of each church preach a sermon on For- 
eign Missions during the year. 

Second— That our churches make use of the many free tracts 
which can be secured from the Foreign Mission oBard, Richmond, 
Va., for the small cost of a postal card. 

Third — In order to save interest, which amounts to quite a sum, 
we earnestly urge every church to send its contribution regularly 
each month for Foreign Mission to Walters Durham, Raleigh, N. 
C. And we recommend the Every Member Canvass, and weekly 
contributions as the Bible plan of giving. 

Respectfully submitted, 
J. A. McKAUGHAN 
C. E. MORGAN 
J. A. RUCKER 

Committee. 

Gladly welcomed D. J. Hunt, former principal of Round 
Hill School, now pastor of Clififside feaptist church. Also 
R. T. Vann, representing Christian schools. 

By motion, at its request, granted a letter of dismission 
to the Armstrong church to unite with the Yancy County 
Association. 

Mrs. A. L. Grayson presented a file of minutes dating 
back to its fifth annual meeting. By motion said file of 
associational minutes were thankfully received. They con- 



14 Minutes of the 



tain very important matter for history. The Association 
decided to send this file of minutes to Wake Forest College 
for safe keeping and future reference. 

A committee on obituaries, whose names will appear on 
their report, were appointed. 

OBITUARY. 

Deacon A. L. Grayson was born July 7th, 1849, and died August 
12th, 1917. 

He was a son of Rev. Joseph C. Grayson and was brought up un- 
der the best Christian influences. At an early age he became a 
member of the Baptist church. When he went to live at Ruth- 
erfordton he removed his membership to the Rutherfordton Baptist 
church of which he was a consistent and active member and dea- 
con till his death. 

He came to Rutherfordton in his early manhood, about 1870. Bro. 
Grayson was for a long time treasurer of his church and was also 
for many years treasurer of the Association. He was an active ' 
business man. He was postmaster for one term under President 
Cleveland. He was treasurer of the Masonic lodge, and secretary 
and treasurer of Citizen's Building and Loan Association for many 
years. 

Up till the time of his death, in fact he was treasurer of more 
things than any man the writer ever knew. He was cashier of the 
Citizen's Bank of Rutherfordton from the date of its organization 
until its reorganization a few years ago. And in all these respon- 
sible positions requiring the handling of finances his accounts al- 
ways balanced to a cent. Nobody ever lost a penny on his account. 
Nobody ever questioned his integrity or accuracy. The writer knew 
him intimately for more than forty years and lived a neighbor to 
him all these years, and if he ever did a willful wrong or lost his 
temper in all that time his friends and neighbors never knew it. 
His entire life was a bright example of industry and piety. His 
religion was his guide throughout his daily life. His pastor relied 
on him and he never failed him. His church and Sunday School 
were close to his heart and he was a constant attendant at each. 

After a long and useful life he has entered into rest, leaving his 
wife and daughters the heritage of a well spent life. 

ELD. J. A. McKAUGHAN 
JUDGE M. H. JUSTICE. 

Report of committee nomination executive board of mis- 
sions was read by C. F. Keeter. 
By motion, adjourned for dinner. 

AFTERNOON SESSION, 2 P. M. 

Prayer by Rev. H. D. Harrill of Sandy Run Association. 
One of the former faithful and successful pastors of this 
Association. 



Green River Baptist Association 15 



Announced a committee to nominate the executive Board 
of Missions, and a representative for each mission. 

Welcomed Joe Sinclair, and Z. Wall of Sandy Run As- 
sociation. Also Dr. Buchanan of Mitchel county. 

A collection was taken for minutes. Fro the amount, see 
treasurer's report. 

Report on Christian Education was read by G. G. O'Neal. 

J. D. Morris read report on Round Hill School. A. C. 
Warlick and G. A. Martin spoke on the Round Hill School 
report. 

R. T. Vann spoke on Christian Education. A subscrip- 
tion was taken for the Round Hill School and turned over 
to J. D. Morris for collection. Adjourned. 

FRIDAY NIGHT, 8 O'CLOCK P. M. 

The Round Hill School gave a musical concert. 

SATURDAY 9:30 A. M. 

Scripture reading by J. A. McKaughan. Prayer by J. L. 
Taylor. Read and adopted record of yesterday. 

By motion instructed the delegates from each church to 
elect one member of their church to serve on the board of 
trustees of Round Hill School. Resumed the discussion 
of the Round Hill School according to agreement yesterday. 

The financial condition of the school was thoroughly dis- 
cussed, by G. A. Martin, G. G. O'Neal, M. H. Justice, and 
J. A. McKaughan. The school was shown to be much in 
debt. The churches last year did not report any money 
collected on the apportioned plan as given in last year's 
minutes. The trustee in each church is asked to make an 
earnest effort in an every member canvass of his church to 
collect money enough to pay their proportional part of the 
debt on the school, and to attend the meetings of the trus- 
tees if possible. The school must be freed from debt or we 
will lose it. 

REPORT ON ROUND HILL ACADEMY. 

StatisticaL 

Number of teachers employed 5 

Number of pupils enrolled 82 

Number of graduating students 6 

Total number of graduates to date 76 



i6 Minutes of the 



Debits. 

To teachers' salaries, paid $1,885.00 

To printing 45.60 

To house and phone rents 80.00 

To cash for wood 70 00 

To mattresses, chairs and stove 69.80 

To incidental expenses 343.02 

To Cash to Nanney & Morris 191.71 

To cash to Miller Hardware Co 13.95 

To Rev. J. E. Hagle campaigning, etc 49.97 

To traveling expenses of speaker 5.00 

Total $2,754.05 

Credits. 

By balance on hand from last year $ 37.80 

By tuition collected 1,596.82 

By cash from Home Mission Board 700.00 

By cash from pay entertainments 29.00 

By rents and other credits * 268.60 

Total $2,754.03 

J. D. MORRIS, Sec. and Treas. 

Round Hill Academy. 

REPORT ON EDUCATION. 

Our educational work has been recently organized. Instead of 
having several departments, like "Ministerial Education," "Schools," 
Colleges," we have consolidated under one head, namely: "Chris- 
tian Education," with Dr. R. T. Vann as secretary. 

We own in North Carolina fourteen high schools and three col- 
leges with an aggregate value of $1,600,000. 

We are part owners in the Louisville Seminary, and the Woman's 
Training School there. From which schools go out every year 
some four thousand students for service in the kingdom. 

Other denominations have long been awake to the wisdom and 
value of Christian training for their young people and are press- 
ing this work. In view of this and our great need for training 
among our people, the convention at its last session requested 
every Baptist church in making up its contributions to raise if 
possible two-fifths as much for Christian education as it raises 
for State Missions. 

Your committee recommends that this association project its ed- 
ucational work on the two-fifths basis. 

G. G. O'NEILL 
F. O. LEWIS 
A. C. WARLICK 

Recognized J. T. Beaty, Presbyterian minister. 

On motion, voted to ask the churches to try to raise their 
contributions for missions, orphanage, ministerial relief, 
and Christian education ten per cent. 



Green River Baptist Association 17 



x\dopted report on Woman's Work as read by Prof. Ross 
Hill. Also adopted paper read by Miss .Clara Morris, pres- 
ident of W. M. U. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON WOMAN'S WORK 

Your Committee on Woman's Work beg leave to report: 

In the beginning, woman was created a lielp meet for man, but 
as the years rolled on, that fact was lost sight of, and she began 
to be regarded as a slave or a play thing. 

With the advent of Christianity, her place as equal of man was 
restored, but still her value as a helper was overlooked. 

Not until recent times has her worth been recognized, and that 
she is doing her share in the activities of the world. 

In the religious world she has, by her methods proved a valuable 
leader. She has shown us how systematic giving solves the ques- 
tion of our finances, how by mission study classes, and her monthly 
ihisionary meetings interest in missions is deepened, and by train- 
ing the young people how the work is to be continued. 

She has gathered up the fragments of money and time, and shown 
what a mighty factor little things can become. 

Now, however, she is getting a vision of larger things, and begins 
to see that if so much can be accomplished by small things, how 
much more can be done with large things. 

Miss Heck said after the first few years' work in Woman's Mis- 
sionary Societies that when the North Carolina women gave ten 
thousand dollars in one year to missions, she thought she would be 
ready to die. She lived to see the amount grow to over fifty thou- 
sand dollars a year, and the work keeps growing. 

One of the most notable things undertaken by the women is the 
Training School in Louisville. It began in a few rooms with very 
poor equipment, but it has grown so much that the call to Arise and 
Build became imperative. At first the plans were for a house cost- 
ing seventy-five thousand dollars to be paid in three years. 

When the architect drew his plans it was found that nothing less 
than offe hundred and fifty thousand dollars would be required to 
put up adequate buildings. 

Those have the mattter in charge, brought the message to the 
women assembled in annual meeting at Asheville. 

Thy were almost afraid to report so great an increase in ex- 
pense, but the women, without any debate, simply voted to build, 
and said, "We will each do our part" and the building will be 
erected. 

It was arranged to pay for it in three years, raising fifty thousand 
a year. When the delegates took the report to their respective 
States, and it was handed down to the local societies, the response 
was so generous and prompt, that soo nthe thought came, "Why not 
raise it all in one year and open the school session free from debt?" 

That has been done, and as soon as the building is finished the 
money will all have been raised. It has all been done so quietly 
that very few except those engaged in the work knew anything 
about it. 

Of what the women have giivein to missions I will not speak for 
it is an old story. 



1 8 Minutes of the 



Our pastors have learned on whom to depend when there is spe- 
cial work to be done. 

The comparatively new work of "Personal Service," new in name 
only, has been undertaken with characteristic zeal and earnest- 
ness. 

This seems peculiarly adapted to women, for the tender, tactful 
sympathy need to open the hearts of the poor and sick, belong 
naturally to women. 

Let us obey the injunction of PauU "Help those women wno la- 
bored with me in the oGspel," and let our women feel that we stand 
shoulder to shoulder with them in all good works. 

We recommend that an effort be made to organize a society in 
each church and a Baptist woman be urged to assist in the work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. R. HILL. 

WOMAN'S WORK. 

The Woman's Missionary Society has nobly applied itself to the 
task of helping to establish God's Kingdom in the hearts of men. 

The aim of the Woman's Missionary Union: a study of methods; 
a desire for better methods, for enlisting other women and for 
the graded system of the Woman's Missionary Union organization; 
the maintenance of the full graded system in 216 churches in 13 
States; more Bible and mission study classes; a deeper spirituality; 
larger prayer life; larger society contributions through increasing 
membership; more organizations; better programs; more leaders in 
societies and associations; women learning to do through study 
and efficiency; increased interest in young people and unenlisted 
women; more subscriptions to missionary magazines; new organi- 
zations in uncultivated fields; and a deeper conception of Christian 
stewardship. With these aims in mind we go forward in the work 
of the Master. 

In 29 years the Woman's Missionary Union has given for the 
missionary objects, $4,570,066.04. Last year for the missionary ob- 
jects, $501,812.70. Standard of Excellence Societies, $4,879. Num- 
ber of missionary societies, 15,840. Number of new missionary so- 
cieties, 2,878. Leaflets and pamphlets distributed, 362,633. 

Last quarter (June, July, and August), the Woman's Missionary 
Union of North Carolina gave more than $15,000. 

$150,000 for the new training school building is one of the great- 
est things we have undertaken. North Carolina has already paid 
more than $500 above her proportional part. 

The aim this year for the Church Building Loan Fund is $11,000. 
In 16 States alone over 2,100 societies are a result. The net gain 
last year being over 1,000; over 600 among the young people. 

In 15 States 2,900 mission study classes, 840 of them being among 
the young folks. 

In the Green River Association there are 18 societies in eleven 
churches, giving this year $485. It is good to know that, personal 
service is becoming a vital part of the work in all the States. 

We ask for your co-operation in the organization of a woman's 
missionary society and organizations for the young peple in each 
church. This wil help wnderfully to enlist and train workers for 
the Kingdom of oGd. CLARA MORRIS. 



Green River Baptist Association 19 



An inconlplete report on the digest of letters and state of 
churches was read by Rev. A. P. Sorrels and adopted. 

COMMITTEE ON DIGEST OF LETTERS AND STATE OF 
CHURCHES 

Report of Committee on Digest of Letters and State of Churches 
submit this incomplete report. We find reported on pastors' sala- 
ries $5,270.60. An increase of $103.78. Minute fund $34.55. A de- 
crease of $13.85. State Missions $474.28. A decrease of $20.19. 
Home Missions $387.75. A decrease of $57.52. Foreign Missions 
$467.98. A decrease of $110.69. Orphanages $580.01. An increase 
of $37.55. 

We seriously ask the question, "What is the state of the 
churches?" Are we pressing onward to better things? Or drifting 
with the worldly tide. We note dissatisfaction, disagreement, and 
at times sliarp contention among the workers. Some over empha- 
size the educational work, others only do evangelistic work. They 
try to put a premium on ignorance as if the Holy Spirit could only 
use the untrained and uneducated mind in doing the Lord's work. 
Questionable pleasures are participated in by many church mem- 
bers to the neglect of spiritual worship and character building. 
Discipline in the churches is almost a thing of the past. At times 
when exercised, selfishness instead of love is the dominating force. 
However ,we believe the churches, like Peter, have the prayers of 
Jesus in their behalf "that their faith fail not" while in Satan's 
sifter. 

A. P. SORRELS 

T. R. FLACK 

M. H. JONES 

Committee. 

Report of committee on time, place, and preacher was 
read by A. P. Sorrels and by motion was adopted. 

COMMITTEE ON TIME AND PLACE 

Report of Committee on Time and Place, and Preacher, submit 
the following report: 

Time of meeting Thursday before the first Sunday in October, 
1918. 

Place Piedmont Church, three miles southwest of Rutherfodton. 
Annual sermon by J. A. McKaughan; alternate, M. M. Huntley. 

R. LEDBETTER 
J. C. McDANIEL 
W. A. HARRILL 

Committee. 
Recess one hour. 

SATURDAY AFTERNOON 2 O'CLOCK 

Prof. A. C. Warlick read report on periodicals, which was 
adopted. 



20 MiNUTKS OF THE 



REPORT ON PERIODICALS AND BIBLICAL RECORDER. 

In this day of magazines, newspapers, yellow journals and floods 
of trashy publications entering our homes through the mails, we 
are forced to make a selection in order to have suitable reading 
matter. There is no doubt in our minds that in this present age 
of national conflict we are prone to neglect the religious literature 
just because it does not give an account of some party scandal 
or an account of the unearthing of some German plot. We should 
keep abreast with the times but there is another side of life that 
needs cultivating. Bacon tells us that reading maketh a full man, 
and Richard Baxter in The Christian Directory tells us that "It is 
not the reading of many books which is necessary to make a man 
wise or good, but the well reading of a few, could he be sure to have 
the best. And it is not possible to read over many on the same 
subject in great deal of loss of precious time." In all of these 
publications how are we to select the best? The answer is to 
read the publications of our Sunday School Board, The Biblical 
Recorder, The Foreign Mission Journal, Home Field, and Charity 
and Children. Christ has said go into all the world and preach 
the Gospel; but how shall we go unless we know where to go and 
how are we to know where unless we read these publications. 

When you meet one who is deeply interested in any cause you 
may be sure that that one has been reading and thinking as a re- 
sult of the reading on that subject. Knowledge of any subject 
breeds interest in that subject. That being the case we can readily 
see why we are not more interested in our Master's business — 
we do not know enough about it. Your committee urges that these 
publications be given flrst place in all of the homes in this associa- 
tion. 

A. C. WARLICK 
M. L. EDWARDS 
-D. C. NANNEY 

The two reports, "Periodicals" and "Biblical Recorder" are com- 
bined into this one report. — (Clerk). 

Rev. G. A. Martin spoke in the interest of the B. Y. P. U. 
work. 

A resolution to appoint a committee to group the churches 
into pastorates was adopted. On motion of Rev. G. A. Mar- 
tin, A. P. Sorrels was made chairman of said committee. 
RESOLUTIONS ON CO-OPERATIONS OF CHURCHES IN FORM- 
ING PASTORATES. 

Whereas there is great need of securing the co-operation of the 
churches of this Association in grouping churches into pastorates, 
and locating pastors in the pastorates thus formed, therefore re- 
solve: 

That a Co-operative Committee of seven wise judicious brethren, 
who are not deacons, be appointed by the moderator, who will co- 
operate with the churches through their deacons, and so far as 
possible group the churches into pastorates ,and aid the pastorates 
thus formed in securing and locating a pastor on the field, who will 
give his v/hole time to the work and developmant of the pastorate. 



Green River Baptist Association st 



The moderator appointed the following committee : Elder 
A. P. Sorrels, chairman; J, A. McKaughan, G. A, Martin, 
J. B. Arledge, F. L. Simmons, W. F. McMahan, John 
Hodge, 

Board of trustees for Round Hill School elected by the 
delegates, viz. : Camp Creek, J. C Guffie ; Piedmont, E. P, 
White; Mt. Creek, PI. P. Rucker ; Rock Spring, John Lat- 
timore ; Bethel, E. G. Goforth ; Bills Creek, William Flynn ; 
Pea Ridge, Romeo Philips ; Pleasant Hill, C. C. Lovelace ; 
Pleasant Grove, R. Ledbetter ; Harmony Grove, Joe Hens- 
ley ; ; Dysartsville, W. H. Taylor; Clear Creek, W. D. Long; 
Zion Hill, J. M. Pendergrass ; Old Fort, John H. Bradley. 

All the other churches which have not a member on the 
board of trustees for R. H, S. are asked to take this matter 
up in conference and elect one of their most active mem- 
bers to serve on this board, and report the name to A. P. 
Sorrels as soon as they vv^ell can. 

The following chairmen of committees were appointed 
to write and report on the following topics at the 1918 ses- 
sion : 

State Missions— J. A. McKaughan, Rutherfordton, N. G 

Home Missions — G. A. Martin, Marion, N. C. 

Foreign Missions— G. G. O'Neal, Rutherfordton, N. C. 

Sunday Schools — H. P. Rucker, Gilkey, N. C. 

Christian Education — W. Ross Hill, Rutherfordton, N. C. 

Round Hill School— A. C. Warlick, Union Mills, N. C. 

Orphanage — B. B. Price, Marion, N. C. 

Ministerial Relief— M. L. Edwards, Rutherfordton, N. G 

B. Y. P. U. Work— Frank Freeman, Rutherfordton, N. C. 

Woman's Work — W. T. Morgan — Marion, N. C. 

State of Churches and Digest of Letters — M. H. Jones, 
Rutherfordton, N. C. 

Pastoral Fields— A. P. Sorrels, Union Mills, N. C. 

Obituaries — J. P. Jones, Rutherfordton, N. C. 

In lieu of a written report on Obituaries this year we in- 
sert the verbal statement of the chairman of the commit- 
tee memorial remembrance of William M. Blanton, of Ma- 
rion. Once moderator of the Association ; for about forty 
years a faithful successful teacher in the Marion Sunday 
school. 

Adin L. Rucker, clerk of the Association for some twenty 



22 Minutes of the 



to thirty years; always faithful, accurate and self-sacrific- 
ing-. Lean of flesh but strong in mind. 

M. H. JUSTICE, Chairman Committee 

R. P. GEER 

J. D. MORRIS 

REV. BEN HARRIS 

F. O. LEWIS 

H. P, RUCKER 

The moderator appointed the following deleg"ates to the 
Southern Baptist Convention, viz. : Elder G. A. Martin^ 
Elder J, A. McKaughan, Bro. W. T. Morgan. The mod- 
erator also appointed the following delegates to the Baptist 
State Convention, viz. : Elder J. A. McKaughan, Bro. M. L/ 
Edwards, Elder A. P. Sorrels, Bro. B. B. Price, and Elder 
G. A. Martin, 

The clerk read the treasurer's report which was adopted. 

A rising vote of thanks was extended to the Round Hill 
church and community, for their kind, generous, and abun- 
dant hospitality during the meeting of the Association. The 
table of apportionments is left out to save $3.50 in the cost 
of printing. 

See last year's financial table, add 10 per cent., collect the 
money monthly. 

By actual count there were 475 people in the house Sat- 
urday and many others outside who could not get in for 
lack of room. 

By motion adjourned to meet at Piedmont on Thursday 
before the first Sunday in October, 1918. 

JUDGE M. H. JUSTICE, Moderator 
ELDER A. P. SORRELS, Clerk 



SUNDAY MORNING, 11 O'CLOCK 1 

Sermon by G. G. O'Neal. ; ' ' 

SUNDAY 2 P. M. 

Sermon by A. P. Sorrels. 

P. S. — On Saturday a collection was taken for minutes 
and Clerk amounting to $4.75. 

A. P. SORRELS, Clerk. 



Green River Baptist Association 23 



Woman'a Missionary Union, 

The fourth annual meeting- of the Woman's Missionary 
meeting (separate from the Association) of the Green River 
Association met on September 22, 1917, with Mt. Vernon 
church. Devotional service was conducted by Rev, J. A, 
McKaughan. Mrs. J. B. Wells in very appropriate words 
welcomed the Union to Mt. Vernon. To which Mrs. War- 
lick responded. 

State Missions, benefit and obligation, were discussed by 
Mrs. Grayson and Mrs, Wells. 

An excellent paper on "The relation of the Green River 
Association to Round Hill School" was read by Miss Ben- 
ton. Following this paper a report was made by the Ruth- 
erfordton Society on work done on the administration build- 
ing of Round Hill School. After discussion all the delegates 
pledged their societies to help pay the expense. Miss Es- 
telle Logan read a paper on our Training School. Mrs. 
Grayson made a splendid talk, "Present Day Activities of 
our Foreign Fields." After singing "America," adjourned 
for dinner. 

Afternoon session opened with prayer by Miss Clara 
Morris. Our Superintendent, Mrs. Ashworth, read a paper 
on the "Missionary Library." After which it was decided 
to have a library in our Union, 

Mrs. Rollins read a paper on, "Keeping the Girls Inter- 
ested," prepared by Miss Alda Taylor. 

"Missions for College Girls," by Miss Alda Grayson. 

After vocal solo by Miss Cardin of Round Hill School, 
which was very much appreciated, report of superintendent 
and delegates. These showed great interest in the work. 
The Union would like to record the gift of thirty dollars 
through the Mt. Vernon society of Mrs. Brusilla Walker, 
deceased. 

The following officers were elected, viz. : Superintendent, 
Miss Clara Morris ; Assistant Superintendent, Miss Alda 
Grayson ; Secretary, Mrs. J. L. Taylor ; Mrs. G. A. Martin, 
Y. W. C. A. leader. 

The Union expressed hearty thanks for the cordial wel- 
come and co-operation of Mt. Vernon, and enjoyed the din- 
ner, which was excellent and abundant. 

The next annual meeting with Mt. Creek Church, Sat- 
urday before the fourth Sunday in September, 1918. 

MRS. J. L. TAYLOR, Secretary. 



24 Minutes op thf: 



CONSTITUTION 

This Association shall be known as the Green River aBptist As- 
sociation and shall be composed of Baptist Churches whose articles 
of Faith and Constitutions are in harmony with those of the Asso^ 
elation. 

Each church shall be allowed a representation of two delegates, in 
addition to their regular ordained ministers, and every church of 
over fifty members shall be allowed one additional delegate for 
every fifty additional members. 

The primary objects of the Association shall be to encourage and 
support Wake Forest College, to educate young men called of God 
to the Ministry and approved by the churches to which they belong; 
to encourage education among the people of the State; to support 
the Gospel in the destitute portions of the State and of the South- 
ern Baptist Convention, to send the Gospel to the Nations that 
have it not; to encourage the distribution and study of the Bible 
and a sound religious literature to assist Baptist Churches in the 
erection of houses of worship, to encourage the proper care of in- 
digent orphan children and destitute and aged ministers of the 
Gospel, to encourage the organization and support of Baptist Sun- 
day Schools; and to co-operate with the Baptist State Convention 
in all its departments of labor. 

The Association shall meet annually on Thursday before the first 
Sabbath in October. 

The officers of the Association shall be a Moderator, Clerk and 
Treasurer, who shall be elected by the Association and continue in 
office until their successors are elected. 

The Moderator shall preside or fill the chair, by calling some 
member of the body thereto, and enforce order in accordance with 
Mell's Parliamentary Practice. 

The Clerk shall record the proceedings, conduct the correspond- 
ence, and publish and distribute the Minutes. 

The Treasurer shall receive all funds contributed by the churches 
or individuals to the object of the Association, receipting the con- 
tributors for the same; and forward all contributions to their proper 
destination, and make a full report of all receipts and disburse- 
ments to the Association at its annual session, and on retiring from 
his office turn over to his successor all moneys, papers and books 
belonging thereto. 

There shall be appointed by the Association at each session a 
Board of Missions and Sunday Schools, consisting of one member 
from each church belonging to the Association and other brethren 
living in Rutherfordton or its immediate vicinity, five of whom shall 
constitute a quorum, which during the intervals between the meet- 
ings of the Associations, shall have charge of the various interests 
and objects fostered by the Association, and shall encourage the 
churches to give liberally thereto, and shall make a full report of 
its work including such suggestions relative thereto as it may think 
advisable to the Association at its annual sessions. 

The President, or in case of his death or disqualification, any 
three members of the Board may call a meeting thereof. 

This Constitution may be changed or amended at any annual 
session by two-thirds of the representatives voting in the affirma- 
tive. 



Green River Baptist Association 25 



ASSOCIATION COVENANT 

Article 1. We believe in one only and true God, and that there 
are three Persons in the Godhead — the Father, the Son, and Holy 
Ghost, and these are one in substance, and equal in power and 
glory. 

Article 2. We believe the Scriptures of Old and New Testaments 
are the Word of God, and the only rule of faith and practice. 

Article 3. We believe in the doctrine of original sin. 

Article 4. We believe in man's impotency to recover himself 
from the fallen state he is in by his own free will and ability. 

Article 5. We believe that sinners are justified in the sight of 
God only through the imputed righteousness of Jesus Christ. 

Article 6. We believe the saints shall persevere in grace, and that 
they never shall finally fall away. 

Article 7. We believe that Baptisms and the Lord's Supper are 
ordinances instituted by Christ and that true believers are the only 
proper subjects thereof. 

Article 8. We believe that immersion is the only Scriptural mode 
of baptism. 

Article 9. We believe that no person has a right to administer 
the ordinances but such as are regularly called and qualified 
thereto. 

Article 10. We believe in the resurrection of the dead, and a gen- 
eral judgment; that the punishment of the wicked shall be ever- 
lasting, and the joys of the righteous eternal. 

Article 11. We, the members of the Green River aBptist Associa- 
tion, agreeing to the above Articles of Faith, do, for and in behalf 
of the churches which we represent, covenant and agree and give 
ourselves up to ach other in church and Christian fellowship, in 
order to keep up the unity of the spirit in the bonds of peace, and 
to assist each other in all matters of distress and to pray for each 
other's prosperity. 



26 



MiNUTKS OF Tim 



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TREASURER'S REPORT 

For Minnte Fund and other funds that were paid at the Association at Round Hill 
«OTi October 4th and 5th, 19l7. 



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125 

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: 30 
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1.20 
3.00 
1. 00 

2.00 
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.80 
1,90 

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4.00 
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.60 

II. 12 


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5.00 
1. 00 
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2.50 
2.69 
4.19 

5.00 
2.43 

3.00 
20.00 
2.00 
2.50 
4.00 

1.23 
I63.54 


$ I-I5 

1. 00 
3.00 
1. 00 
2,00 

6.00 

2.00 
2.68 
4.16 

4.00 
2.25 

8.00 
3.35 
3-55 
2.00 
2.50 
7.00 

1. 00 
I56.64 


$525 

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2.00 
3.00 
1.00 
2.00 

6.00 

2.00 
2.68 
416 

2.93 
1.80 

3*35 
10.00 
2.00 
3.00 
7.00 

1. 00 


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2.00 

6. 1 1 
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6 00 

350 

8.90 
500 

5.00 
1.62 

6.83 
4.00 
3.00 
2.50 
4.80 


$ 7.25 
.60 

1. 15 
2.40 

1.50 

,70 

- 

I-50 
1.20 


$ 501 

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1. 00 

2.00 
1.50 

1.25 
2.10 

1.50 
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2.50 
2.00 
1.50 
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1. 10 


Beulah „ „ 

Hig Level 

Bills Creek „ 

Cane Creek , 

Clinchfield 


4.40 

9^85 

12.30 

.9-31 
17.00 


Clear Creek 

East Marion 

Glenwood „ 


350 

22.90 

2.00 


Green Hill 


12.55 


Harmony Grove . . 
Macedonia 


19-95 
18.71 


Marion 

Mill Spring 


3.00 
20.93 


Montfords Cove...... 

Mt Creek 

Mt. Vernon 


9.00 
2.00 
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Nebo „ 

Old Fort 


.50 
10.00 


Pleasant Qrove 

Pleasant Hill 


17-33 
4'.95 


Pea Ridge 


13-50 


Piedmont . .. 


15.20 


Rock Springs 


27.90 


Round Hill 


4.00 


Whiteside Valley.. 

Woodlawn 

Zion Hill 


3-73 
.60 

■75 


Collection at Asso. 


II. 12 


Totals 


$50.70 


I60.17 


$68.86 


$16.30 


$25.06 


$341.34 



M. H. JONES, Treas. 
The following: amounts were received b.v the Clerk Saturday in the absent of the 
Treasurer and have been placed in the Peoples Bank at Union Alills and will be 
forwarded. 



CHURCHES AND 
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$8.82 


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$682 


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A. P. SORRELS, Clerk 



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Totals 



iS? 



MINUTES 



OF THE 



SEVENTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL SESSION 



OF THE 



Norm Carolina Green River 

Baptist Association 



HELD WITH 



PIEDMONT BAPTIST CHURCH, 
OCTOBER 3rd and 4TH, 1918, 



OFFICERS: 



Moderator, - - - . . . g. A. Martin, 

Vice-Moderator, - - - - A, P. Sorrels, 

Clerk, J, A. McKaughan, 

Treasurer, - W. A. Harrill, 



TO CHURCH TREASURERS: Do not keep Contributions till end of Associational 
Year; but send all Mission and Education money to Walters Durham, Raleigh, N C, and 
Orphanage money to F, B. Hamrick, Thomasville, N. C, and bring Minute money to the 
Association. 



Next Session will be held with Camp CreeK Church 5 Miles East of Union 
Mills, N. C. beginning Thursday before the First Sunday in Oct.. 1919. 



1918. 

Harrell's PRiNTiNCk House. 

Weldon, N. C. 



^ — ^ 



MINUTES 



OF THE 



SEVENTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL SESSION 



OF THE 



Norm Carolina Green River 

Baptist Association 



HELD WITH 



PIEDMONT BAPTIST CHURCH, 

OCTOBER 3rd and 4TH, 1918. 



OFFICERS: 



Moderator, - - - - - - G. A. Martin, 

Vice-Moderator, - . » - A. P. Sorrels, 

Clerk, . = » ^ » » j. A. McKaughan, 

Treasurer, - - - ~ - - W, A. Harrill, 



TO CHURCH TREASURERS: Do not keep Contributions till end of Associational 
Year; but send all Mission and Education money to Walters Durham, Raleigh, N. C, and 
Orphanage money to F. B. Hamrick, Thomasville, N. C, and bring Minute money to the 
Association. 



Next Session will be ineld with Camp Creek Church D Milea East of Union 
Mills, N. C. beginning Thursday before the First Sunday in Oct., 1919. 



1918. 

Harreli.'s Printing House, 

Weldon, N. C. 



StafidiriQ GommlURes on Reports SorNext ftgsociaiiorio 

state Missions-G. G. O'Neal. 

Home Missions— J. A. McKaughan. 

Foreign Mission — G. A. Martin. 

Sunday Schools— J. Lloyd laylor. 

Christian Education — W. W. Walker. 

Round Hill Academy — M. L. Edwards. 

Million Dollar Campaign — J. A. McKaughan. 

Orphanage— R. G. Short. 

Ministerial Relief — T. FI. Roach. 

Pastorial Fields and State of Churches — A. P. Sorrels. 

Woman's Work — Miss Clara Morris. 

B. Y. P. U.— Mrs. Frank P. Freeman, 

Memorial — Obituaries — J. M. Walker, 

Trustees Round Hill School. 

Martin, G. A. Marion, N. C, 

Flack, W. F ...-. _-_ Union Mills, 

McKaughan, J. A Rutherfordton. 

Justice, M. L „ Rutherfordton, 

Harrill, W. A., -___„- -Rutherfordton, 

Taylor, W, H, .„_ Dysartsville, 

Brown. A. E. Dr „ Asheville, 

Morgan. W. T Marion, 

Flack, M. P.-__„. -_„-_-- _-__- Union Mills, 

Morris, J. D. Union Mills, 

Ledbetter, R. _ Uree, 

Brown, E. S ._ .. NeaJsville, 

Long, W. D. . Old Fort, 

Walker, W. W. . Rutherfordton, 

Tavlor, Z V Uree, 

Hiil. H. W ., __Columbus, 

White, E. P. Rutherfordton, 

Goforth. E. G. ____...__ Nealsville, 

Rucker, H. P. ._.___.___._ __. Gilkey, 

Lattimore, J. W 

Lovelace, C. C „„„__ Rutherfordton, 

Flynn. W. M 

Edwards, M. L . Rutherfordton, 

Church Groups for Sunday School Institutes. 

Group 1— J. M. Walker, Leader; Columbus, Mill Spring, 
Pearidge. Silver Creek, Mountain View% Cooper's Gap, Reck 
Spring, Big Level, Beulah, Cane Creek. 



Group 2.— J. A. McKaughan, Leader; Whiteside Valley, 
Bills Creek. Mount Pleasant, Stone Mountain, Piney Knob, 
Pleasant Grove, Green Hill, Mt. Creek, Mt. Vernon, Pied- 
mont, Pleasant Hill. Round Hill, Rutherfordton, Camp Creek. 

Group 3. ~G. G. O'Neal and A. P. Sorrels, Leader; Dy 
sartsvilie, Macedonia, Harmony Grove, Glenwood, Chapel 
Hill, Bethel, Zion Hill, Montfords Cove. 

Group 4. — G. A. Martin, Leader; Marion First, Marion 
Second, East Marion, Armstrong, Clear Creek, Greenlee, 
Bethlehem, Old Fort. Cherry Springs. Sunny Vale, Turkey 
Cove, Hall Town, Woodlawn, Nebo, Clinchfield, 

- Ordained Ministers. 

Champion, R. C Landrum, S. C. 

Drake, T. A. Nebo, N. C. 

Hudson, E. V. . _ Louisville, K. Y, 

Hodge, J, L Rutherfordton, N. C. 

Haynes, W. L Rutherfordton, 

Jones, Lee _ Marion, " 

Lowdermilk, D. P Marion, 

Laughter, B. C. l._Mill Spring, " 

McDaniel, T, C. .Cliffside, '[ 

McKaughan, J. A. Rutherfordton, " 

Martin, G. A, Marion, " 

Nelon, J. A Uree, '' 

Nanney, Grady Wake Forest, 

Roach, T. H Marion, " 

Short, R. G Marion, " 

Sorrels, A. P. Union Mills, '' 

Simmons. T. L. Nebo, 

Snypes, M. V. Nebo, " 

Executive Board of Missions. 

Edvvrards. M. L. Rutherfordton, N. C. 

Walker, W. W. _Rutherfordton, 

Keeter, C. W. Rutherfordton, 

Buffaloe, A, R Marion, 

Geer, R. P. Rutherfordton, 

Brov^n, E. S. Nealsyille, 

Sorrels, A. P. _Union Mills, 

Taylor, J.Lloyd Rutherfordton, 

Million Dollar Endovvrment Committee, 

J. A. McKaughan, Chairman, with pov^er to appoint. 



Minutes of the 



PROCEEDINGS. 

Rutherfordton, N. C, Oct. 3rd, 1918. 

The North CaroHiia Green River Baptist Association met 
in its Seventy-Eighth Session with the Piedmont Baptist 
Church, Rutherford County, at 11:00 a. m., and was called 
to order by G. A, Martin, Vice-Moderator. The Introductory 
Sermon was preached by J. A. McKaughan, pastor, Ruther- 
fordton. Matt. 28:19, 20; Acts 2:41, 46; Luke 22:19, 20. 
Subject: "A New Testament Church and its Ordinances.'" 
Prayer by T. H. Roach. 

Letters were tabulated and Delegates enrolled from the 
Churches. 

DELEGATES. 

Armstrong— 

Bethel-M. G. Morgan, J. C. England. 

Bethlehem— J. M. Gibson, C. N. Hogan, 

Beulah— M. G. Wilkey, Jas Smith. 

Big Level— John Skipper. 

Bills Creek— Jas. Frady, J. C, McDaniel. 

Camp Creek— J. C. Guffy. 

Cane Creek-J. D. Gilbert, J. M. Gibbs, J. P. Harris. B. F. 

Jones. 
Chapel Hill— By letter. 

Cherry Springs— J. Y. Gilliam, W. H, Gilliam. 
Clear Creek— W. D. Long, L. M. Turner, Melvin Patton, 
Chnchfield-W. H. Silvers, G. H, Taylor. 
Columbus— J. P. Arledge, W. H. Hill. 
Coopers Gap— Twitty Jackson, J. W. Biddy. 
Dysartville— By Letter. 
Glenwood— E. S. Brown, M. 0. Biggerstaff. 
Green Hill-C. H. Hyder, H. M. Rucker. 
Greenlee— J. M. Pendergrass, S. W. Hall. 
Harmony Grove— W. F. Withsaw, W. W. Huskins. 
Hickory Grove— Dismissed to Sandy Run Association. 
Macedonia— J. W. Wise, B. F. Watkins, G D. Sprouse, G. E. 

Watkins. 
Marion (First j— A. R. Buffaloe. 
Marion (Second)— J. B. Holcomb. 
Marion (East)— G. C. Dixon. 
Mill Spring— Frank Jackson. 



Green River Baptist Association. 



Mt. Creek— A. F. Geer, C. C. Bridges, R. F. Biggerstaff, J. 

H. Flack. 
Mt. Vernon— W. W. Walker, Craton Wells, Grady Freemon, 

W. M. Hudson. 
Mt Pleasant— J. M. Hall, Verno Taylor. 
Mountain View— H. D. Jackson, H. H. McCrain, J. T. Jackson. 
MumfordsCove— H. R. Nanney. 
Nebo—By letter. 
Old Fort— By Letter. 
Piedmont— E. P. White, J. F. Shehan, S. A. Sims, C. E. 

Hill, W. M. Grinold. 
Pleasant Grove— M. C. Blanton, R. Ledbetter, Lewis Mcln- 

tyre. 
Pleasant Hill— D. G. Nanney, C. C, Lovelace, J, Q. Jones. 
Fearidge— J. R. Phillips, E. V. Hyder. 
Piney Knob— G, F. Robertson, J. D. Bland, J. H. Parton, 

W, J. Harden, E. H. Melton. 

Mo f* Irolf tt 

Rock Spring---G. W. Whiteside, W. H. Ledbetter, C. V, 

Elliott. 
Round Hill— C, F. Keeter, Paul Sorrels, J. W. Morgan, J. D. 

Morris. 
Rutherfordton— H. T, Green, W. A. Harrill, U. E. Keeter, 

J. Lloyd Taylor. 
Stone Mountain — 
Silver Creek — 
Sunny Vale — 
Turkey Cove — 

Whiteside Valley— J. A. Frady, J. T Shytle. 
Woodlawn — J. R. Baxter. 
Zion Hill- 

MINISTERS PRESENT. 

M M. Huntly, B. M. Hamrick, J. L. Hodge, H. G. Liner, 
T. H. Roach, G. A. Martin, J. A. McKaughan, G. G. O'Neal, 
R. G Short, N L. Wright, J. M. Walker, A. P. Sorrels, W, 
F. McMahan, J. T. Ruppe. 

The Association then proceeded to organize by electing 
the following officers: 

Moderator— G. A. Martin. 

Vice-Moderator — A, P. Sorrels. 

Clerk— J. A. McKaughan. 

Treasurer — W. A. Harrill. 



Minutes of the 



The following" were appointed to arrange and present the 
order of business: G. G. O'Neal, J. A. McKauo^han, T. H. 
Roach, 

The Association then adjourned with prayer to meet at 
1:45 p. m. 



JlfTEHNCICN SESSION. 

The Association convened at 1:45 p. m., and was opened 
with singing and prayer by H„ D. Harrill. 

The Constitution was, by unanimous vote, amended so as lo 
read: The membership shall be composed of delegates elected 
by the Churches connected with this body, and all ordained 
ministers who are members of, or working as pastors in 
connection with said Churches, and each Church shall be al- 
lowed a representation of two delegates for fifty members, 
and every Church of over fifty members shall be allovv^ed one 
additional delegate for every fifty additional members. 

Brethren H. D. Harrill, of the Sandy Run Association, and 
J. M. Brown, of Wyoming, were recognized by the Modera- 
tor and welcomed to a seat in the body. 

Committee on Order of Business submitted a report which 
was adopted and followed by the Association: 

The report on State Missions was read by J. A, McKaughan. 
On motion the report was adopted. Pending the adoption 
of the report J. A. McKaughan spoke on the report. 
Report on State Missions. 

The report on Home Missions was read by G. A. Martin, 
who pending its adoption spoke to the report, and on motion 
the report was adopted. 

Report on Home Missions, 

G. G. O'Neal presented the report on Foreign Missions, 
and spoke to the same, after which the report was adopted. 
Report on Foreign Missions. 

W. R. Beah, representing the Biblical Recorder, was in- 
troduced to the Association, and made a splendid address on 
the mission of the Recorder, and urged the Brethren to sub- 



Green River Baptist Association. 



ssribe for the paper and renew their subscriptions. He also 

read the report on the Biblical Recorder, which was adopted. 

Report of Biblical Recorder. 

M. L. Edwards introduced the following Resolutions, 
which were adopted by a unanimous vote. Pending the 
adoption M. L. Edwards, G. G. O'Neal and A. P. Sorrels 
spoke on the resolutions. 

Resolutions 

Greenlee and Second Church Marion applied for member- 
ship in the Association. Bro. G. A. Martin, a member of 
the Organizing Committee, stating that they were regularly 
organized Baptist Churches. On motion they were received. 

Committee on Time, Place and Preacher for next session: 
C, F. Keeter. A. R. Buffaloe and D. C. Nanney. 

Committee to Nominate Executive Committee: G. G. 
O'Neal, J. Lloyd Taylor and W. D. Long. 

Committee on Preaching Services: Pastor and Deacons of 
Piedmont Church. 

After the assignment of homes for the Delegates and an- 
nouncements, the Association adjourned with prayer to meet 
Friday morning at 9:30 o'clock. 

PHIDAY MOHMfN'ti. 

The Association was called to order by the Moderator at 
9:30 o'clock, and^T, H. Roach conducted Devotional Exercises. 

The Report on Education was read by J. A. McKaughan, 
and the Report on Round Hill Academy was read by M. L. 
Edwards, and on motion the reports were adopted. Pending 
the adoption of the reports addresses were made on Educa- 
tion, and the work of Round Hill School by M. L. Edwards 
and A. C. Warlick. 

Report on Education, 

Report on Round Hill Academy. 

On motion the Plan of Campaign suggested by Dr. W. R. 
Cuilom, State Manager of the Million Dollar Endowment 



8 Minutes of the. 



Campaign, and the apportionment of $12,000.00 to this As- 
sociation was accepted, and a committee appointed to appor- 
tion this amount to the Churches. See Committee, 

On motion the Association adjourned for dinner with 
prayer by D. J. Hunt. 



The Association re-convened at 2;00 o'clock, aad was 
opened with singing and prayer by J. A. McKaughan. 

The Committee on Time, Place and Preacher made the fol- 
lowing report: 

Report on Time, Place and Preacher. 

The Moderator appointed the Standing Committee. See 
Standing Committee in front of Minute, 

The report on Ministerial Relief was read by M. L. Ed- 
wards, and discussed by him pending its adoption. On 
motion the report was adopted. 

Report on Ministerial Relief. 

The Orphanage report was read hj J. M. Walker. On 
motion the report was adopted. Pending its adoption J. M. ' 
Walker, R. G. Short and J. Lloyd Taylor spoke on the Or- 
phanage. A contribution of $28.65 was made to the Or- 
phanage. 

Report on Thomasville Baptist Orphanage, 

The report on Pastorial Fields and Pastorial Support was 
made verbally by A. P. Sorrels, who reported development 
and progress. 

All of the Order of Business having been completed but 
two subjects, it was moved and carried that a night session 
be held and complete the program and business. 

On motion the body adjourned with prayer to meet at 
8 o'clock p. m. 



pRiD^iY mmi 

The Association met at 8:00 o'clock and was called to order 
by the Moderator, and was opened with singing by the choir 
and prayer by R. G. Short. 



Green River Baptist Association. 



On motion M. L Edwards v/as appointed a member of 
the State Mission Board for the Association. 

G, A, Martin was elected Representative of the Foreign 
Mission Board for the Association, and J. A. McKaughan 
was elected to represent the Home Mission Board in the As- 
sociation. 

The follovving were appointed Delegates to the Baptist 
State Convention: M. L. Edwards, J. M. Pendergrass and 
A. R. Buffaloe. 

The Report on Sunda:/ Schools was read by M, L. Ed- 
wards, and discussed by M. L. Edwards, R. G Short and G, 
A. Martin, and on motion adopted. 

Report on Sunday Schools. 

The report from the Woman's Missionary Union was read 
by J. A. McKaoghan. Addresses were made on Woman's 
Work by J. A. McKaughan, Joe St. Clair and B. M. Ham= 
rick, and on motion the report was adopted. 

On motion the resolution presented in the report from the 
Woman's Missionary Union, (for resolution see report), w^as 
committed to the Executive Committee of the Association 
for its consideration and action. 

On motion a memorial service to Bro. B. B. Price, former 
Moderator of the Association and Trustee of Round Hill 
Academy, was appointed for Sunday morning, and Judge M. 
H. Justice v/as appointed to make the memorial address. 

On motion the Treasurer was instructed to pay A. P. Sor- 
rels, former Clerk, $5.00 for past services. 

The Treasurer was also instructed to pay the Clerk $15.00 
for his services. 

The Clerk was instructed to have as many minutes 
printed as the money furnished by the Churches would se= 
cure, and distribute to the Churches prorata. 

The Association unanimously voted a Resolution of Thanks 
to the Piedmont saints for their generous hospitality in en- 
tertaining the Association. 

Resolution of Thanks. 



10 Minutes of the 



For Executive Board of Missions which was elected see 
Page 2. 

The Treasurer read his report, which was adopted. 

By motion the body adjourned with singing, "Blessed be 
the tie that binds"' and prayer, to meet at Camp Creek 
Church on Thursday before the first Sunday in October 1919 
at 11:00 o'clock a. m. 

G. A. Martin, Moderator. 
J. A. McKaughan, Clerk, 

There was preaching service at Piedmont Saturday and 
Sunday at 11:00 a. m. and at 2:00 p. m. with splendid results. 



Woman s Missionarv Onion. 

The fifth annual meeting of the Woman's Missionary Union 
of the Green River Association met with Mountain Creek 
Church September 21st, 1918. 

Devotional service was conducted by Miss Florence Nanney. 

A very cordial welcome was given the Union by Miss 
Pearl Flack, to which Mrs. Ashworth responded. 

*'To-day's opportunity in Mission Work'' was interestingly 
presented by Mrs. G. A. Martin, At the close of the ad- 
dress Miss Garden rendered special music. 

Rev. J. A. McKaughan spoke on, "Our Training School,'" 
and other things pertaining to our work. 

Christian Education — Our Baptist Schools and Colleges by 
Mrs. J. Lloyd Taylor. 

Mrs. Worlick discussed Missionary Magazines, and pre- 
sented some definite plans for larger circulation and Mission 
study in our Association. She made it very plain that lack 
of missionary interest was often due to ignorance of the 
needs of missionary work. 

Mrs. John Wells read an interesting paper on "The Mis- 
sionary Society in The Local Community." 

Y, W. A, in our Association was presented by Mrs. G. A. 
Martin. 

An excellent paper on, "Training the Children in Mission- 
ary Thought and Giving," was read by Miss Benton. 



Green River Baptist Association. 11 

Committee on Resolutions offered the following: Resolved 
that the Woman's Missionary Union of the Green River As- 
sociation recommend that the Churches of the Association 
consider the advisability of employing a missionary worker 
who shall give their entire time to enlist every member in 
the Lord's work. And we strongly advise each Society to 
endeavor to attain the standard of excellence, and that each 
Society make an increase of not less than ten per cent in its 
contributions next year. We would urge our strong Socie- 
ties to give all the assistance possible to nearby weak Socie- 
ties, and to organize Societies in near by Churches where 
there is none, 

We wish to express our appreciation of the generous hos- 
pitality of the Mountain Creek people, and will always be 
glad of an opportunity to hold our annual meeting with them. 

The following officers were elected: Superintendent, Miss 
Clara Morris; Associate Superintendents, Miss Alda Gray- 
son and Miss Pearl Flack; Secretary, Mrs. J. Lloyd Taylor; 
Sun Beam Leader, Mrs. A, L. Gryson; Y. W. A. Leader, 
Mrs. Frank P. Freeman. 

The next annual meeting will be held with Old Fort Church 
Saturday before the first Sunday in September 1919. 
Mrs, J. Lloyd Taylor, Sec, 

Rutherfordton N. C. 



Report on State Missions. 

It is true that our State Mission Enterprise is fundamental 
to all our denominational work. It's supreme purpose is to 
plant a Baptist Church in every section of North Carolina, 
and to foster and nourish this infant organization until it has 
become strong and self sustaining. 

In this well enlightened and informed age there are yet 
niany Baptist who do not know what is meant by State Mis- 
sions, and it is still necessary to point out what State Mis- 
sions does and where it works. 

State Missions is under the direction of and operated by 
the State Board of Missions, and this Board with the money 
furnished to it by the Churches for State Mission Work em- 
ploys and sends preachers to destitute places, and supplyments 
the salary of pastors serving weak Churches. 



12 Minutes of the 



The last report made by this Board to our Baptist State 
Convention says that the year preceeding was a most grati- 
fying* one in State Mission work, for which condition we 
should be deeply grateful. There are man^^ sections in our 
fair State where there are few Baptist Churches, and many 
places where the anti-misison spirit poisons the minds of the 
people. 

All departments of our State work is in fine shape, but if 
State Missions is to make the advance absolutely demanded 
by the conditions in the State we must give more money 
for State Missions and more men must be put in the field. 
We must give to State Missions our loyalty and support it in 
every department of its work. 

Save North Carolina and we have made a long step in the 
saving of the South, and with the arm of the South extended 
we can reach around the world. 

J. A. McKaughan, Committee. 

Home Missions. 

The most urgent mission task that confronts us to-day is 
the spiritualization of the life of the New South. The as- 
tonishing increase of the South's wealth will crush the souls 
of the people, if they are not strong enough to master it for 
spiritual ends. And only a vital religious life and service 
can give the strength. 

In the South's unmixed native American blood and evan- 
gelical faith, Southern Christian bodies have had and still 
have their best chance to show what they can do for God, 
people and country. It is at once our radiant opportunity 
and our supreme religious responsibility. 

Baptists are now the most numerous evangelical body in 
America. American Baptists have five sixths of their mem- 
bers in the South, Here we greatly outnumber any other 
religious group. Only yesterday, we felt burdened beyond 
our strength in trying to solve the problem of spiritualizing 
the South's new wealth. And while the battle was still on 
as to whether we had religion enough to master our wealth, 
we vf ere swept into the whirlpool of the greatest war in his- 
tory. 

No people was ever great enough to overcome the down- 
pull of such overvv^helming forces, except as they placed their 
faith in the strength of God and his Christ. A greatly en- 
larged program of Home Missions has been our almost in- 
stinctive response to such challenges. While our people 
have humbled themselves to their knees, they have, through 
the instruction of the Southern Baptist Convention, ordered 



Green River Baptist Association. 13 

their Home Board to undertake tasks that formerly we would 
have considered far beyond us. 

In the days of trial we instinctively turn to the foundations 
of things, which in prosperity we are likely to forget. The 
modest Home Missionary has alvvays wrought among the 
foundations, near the soil Jt is the inspiration of God which, 
in this hour of unusual stress, has prompted Southern Bap- 
tists, greatly to multiply the number and increase the effi- 
ciency of these modest messengers of God's truth. 

The Southern Baptist Convention instructed the Home 
Board to outline its work for this year on the basis of a mil- 
lion dollar apportionment,. It told this Board to enlarge 
greatly in its efforts to serve. Especially did it declare for 
large and worthy efforts to help our soldier boys. Not fewer 
than one in five of the boys in the army are from Baptist 
homes and have Baptist preferences. To serve and safe- 
guard the deepest needs of these boys of ours in a time when 
they will be subjected to severe and unaccustomed stress 
•and trial, is the ranking mission task of Southern Baptists 
at this hour. 

The Home Board is momentarily increasing its successful 
work in the army camps. This calls for greatly enlarged 
giving by our people. It calls for a doubling or more of the 
contributions of our Churches to Home Missions. But our 
people are well able to do this. Every noble impulse will in- 
spire us to declare that we will do it. For country and human 
liberty our boys are giving their all. A loyal Baptist cannot 
afford to do less, and will do no less than his best in help- 
ing to guide and stand by these boys in their deepest spiritual 
longings and needs. $75, 000. 00 is the quota for North Carolina 

Your Committee recommends: 

1, That all our pastors and Churches give frequent 
special seasons of preaching and praying for Home Missions, 
and of giving to the work. 

2. That this Association gladly accept and apportion 
among the Churches its increased apportionment for Home 
Missions. 

3. That our pastors and women be requested to arouse 
an interest in the unusually vital Home Mission Study books 
issued by the Home Mission Board, and to urge the forma- 
tion of Mission Study Classes in these books. 

4, We urge that our pastors and workers order and 



14 Minutes of the 



make a larger use of the splendid free Home Mission tracts 
issued by our Board, An order of the "one-each" package 
will enable each to determine for himself which tracts are 
suitable for his Church, Orders for tracts and books should 
be addressed to the Publicity Department, Baptist Home 
Mission Board, Atlanta, Georgia. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G A. Martin. 

Report on Poreign Missions. 

Foreign Missions is the uttermost reach of the Church, 
in obedience to a command of Jesus our Lord to save sinners. 
At the uttermost we always hesitate. The Church's utter- 
most is always that duty least clearly seen. That there 
should be no uttermost Jesus said, "Teach them to observe 
all things whatsoever I have commanded you." Foreign 
missions ought to be as near the heart of the Churches as 
State Missions or the Orphanage. 

North Carolina contributed last year for Foreign Missions 
$60,209.11. Of this amount Green River Association con- 
tributed $477.14. 

The work is supervised by a Board located in Richmond 
with Dr. J. F. Love as Corresponding Secretary, Work is 
being done in Africa, Argentina, Brazil, China, Italy, Japan 
and Mexico. 

There were baptized last year 6347 converts, 12,930 stu- 
dents were enrolled in our schools and 67,556 patients were 
treated by our Missionary doctors. We have 458 Churches 
with 47, 161 members, 115 of these Churches are self-sustain- 
ing. The members of these Churches contributed last year 
$132,371,05. The urgent need for the work now is, more 
workers and better equipment. Of the 458 Churches one- 
half of these have no house. The schools and hospitals also 
are in great need of better equipment. 

The Churches of this Association are earnestly besought 
to increase our Foreign Mission contributions fifty per cent 
next year. G. G. O'Neal, Com. 

Report on Biblical Recorder. 

The Biblical Recorder has been the organ of the Baptist 
State Convention of North Carolina for more than eighty- 
three years, and has endeavored to be true to its name; that 
is to be thoroughly Biblical in its teaching and a faithful re- 
corder of the news of the Kingdom. 



Green River Baptist Association. 15 

It undertakes to be fraternal, but always firmly Baptistic. 
loyal to our doctrine, devoted to our agencies, stimulating- to 
Baptist progress and expressive of Baptist life. 

It is under the control of the Baptist State Convention, 
this body naming its editor, safe-guarding its policy, utilizing 
its columns, and having a report on it every year. 

It is essential to the highest efficiency of a North Carolina 
Baptist; for there can be no efficiency without interest, nor 
interest without intelhgence. nor intelli.o:ence without infor- 
mation, particularly the information about our work which 
is available week after week in the pages of the Biblical Re- 
corder. 

It is among us the great unifying agency; making neigh- 
bors of widely separated Churches, organically relating each 
reader to every phase of our denominational work and doc- 
trinally binding us together in our views of Bible truth and 
duty. 

In view of the above facts your Committee believes that 
the Recorder should have a place by every Baptist fireside 
in North Carolina, and we urge the hearty co-operation of all 
our people in immediately doubling its circulation. 

W. R. Beach, Com. 
Resolutions. 

Whereas, The Camp Pastor has been a mighty agency 
through which our people, especially our rural people, have 
been enlisted in the prosecution of the war; and 

Whereas, The War Department has seen fit to order the 
discontinuance of the privileges of these camp pastors, thus 
depriving the Baptists, and some other denominations, of 
rendering, free of cost to the Government, religious services 
to our soldier boys; and 

Whereas, ^ The Third Assistant Secretary of War, Dr. F. 
P. Kepple, is lending the War Department of our country 
to the promotion of a religious propaganda, fostered by a 
small group of men headed by Dr. John R. Mott; and 

Whereas, The War Department has thus deprived the 
soldier boys of one of the most effective means of religious 
blessings; and 

Whereas We believe this action of the War Department 
is in violation of the first amendment to the Constitution of 
the United States; and 



16 MixNUTES OF TBE 



Whereas, It seems to be the purpose of the War Depart- 
ment to combine the contributions of all religious denomina- 
tions, those of the Baptist and Roman Catholic included, and 
to ask for donations from ail the denominations for this pur- 
pose in a combined effort; and 

Whereas, We believe this unnecessary, improper, and in- 
expedient and that it will work detriment instead of good; 
therefore 

Rosoived, That we. the Green River Baptist Association 
representing more than five thousand Baptist Church mem- 
bers, do enter our protest against this order denying to the 
camp pastor the privilege of rendering spiritual services to 
our soldier boys in the camps, and most earnestly ask that 
said order be revoked, and we also do enter our protest and 
disapproval of the purpose and plan combining the funds do- 
nated by all religious denominations into one common fund, 
and insist that the funds and contributions made by the 
Baptist be permitted to go exclusively to the Y. M. C. A, 
instead of to a common fund, a part of which shall be used 
for the Knights of Columbus. 

G. A. Martin, 
Moderator Green River Baptist Asso. 

M. L. Edwards, 
Chairman of Executive Commxittee, 

Sleport 051 £disc2i!iop. 

The fact that denominational progress is dependent in this 
day and time on trained leadership is no longer a question. 
It is equally apparent that an educated constituency is nec- 
essary to the denomination that is to make its impress on 
the community and natural life. Not only must we educate 
more largely, but our young men and young women must be 
educated in an atmosphere which is favorable to the growth 
and maintenance of our religious ideals and principles. A 
culture that is not consecrated to Christ' and his ideals is 
not helpful to a State, and as sand for the foundation of de- 
nominational life. The Rock of religion must underlie our 
enterprises both commercial and educational. North Caro- 
lina Baptist are recognizing this fact in an encouraging and 
helpful way. The Baptist of this State now have seventeen 
Christian Schools. They consist of fourteen Academies for 
boys and girls, v/ith ninety-four teachers, and an enrollment 
of 2.599 students last year, and Wake Forest College for 
young men, and Meredith and Chowan Colleges for young 



Green River Baptist Association. 17 



women. The total enrollment in the three Colleges last 
year was 1082. The reports from the Academies and Colleges 
indicate a much larger enrollment this year. 

It is worthy of mention that in these schools a Bible course 
is provided in the curriculum and required for graduation, 
and that m.ost of the unconverted students make a profes- 
sion of faith in Christ while in school. 

After a years prayerful consideration the Baptist State 
Convention at its last session in Durham decided to raise a 
Million Dollar Endowment for our Schools and Colleges, of 
which sum .^250,000,00 is to be used for the support of our 
High Schools, and the other for the endovvment of Wake 
Forest, Meredith and Chovv^an Colleges, ¥/e recommend 
that this Association give its hearty endorsement of, and 
hearty co-operation to the work of raising its proportional 
part of the Million Dollars, which is $12,000.00, five thousand 
of which will go to our own school — Round Hill Academy. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

W, R. Hill, Com. 

Report 081 S^oyfid Hill Academy i9l7-i9SS. 

October 3rd, 1918. 

STATISTICAL. 

Number of teachers employed -. „„. >„_.,_ 5 

Number of students enrolled„„„_ __„„__- 98 

Graduating students 7 

Total number of graduates to date _„ ^ „ 83 

DEBITS. 

To Teachers' salaries paid _-.„..„..._„_.. $2723 34 

Printing „._,. __._ 77 16 

House rents paid __.. 105 30 

Bursar for collecting tuition . „ 30 00 

Traveling expenses of speakers______^_^„_. „ 15 00 

Canvassing __.__.„ 27 19 

Improvements and equipments „.„ 101 49 

Wood „ .._ 85 05 

Incidental expense.__... . „_______ 180 09 



Total „. ^3463 55 



18 Minutes of the 



CREDITS, 

To Tuition collected .__. „_ „ $2622 10 

" Home Board 700 OO 

" Pay Entertainments „___ . 96 25 

;| Gifts 15 45 

Advertising collected . ^ _. 29 75 

" Deficit paid by Trustees . 119 2S 



Total _.„„ $3463 55 

W, F. Flack, Sec, and Treas. 

We were compelled to buy some furniture for our domi- 
tories and purchased S190.00 worth from The Catawba Fur- 
niture Company at Marion, N. C, also $32,00 worth Fur- 
nishings from M. Levy at Rutherfordton, N. C. We also 
bought 36 Chairs and some other minor things. 

Miss Mary Morris is to teach the 6th and 7th grade His- 
tory, also 6th Grade Science, also 7th Science, and for this 
she receives tuition for Domestic Science and Piano and 
tuition for 12th English, and the sum of $50.00 for the en- 
tire school year. She is guaranteed only S50.00 per year and 
the tuition collected from 5th Grade students goes to pay 
this named salary. The 5th grade is an addition to the 
work and is supposed to pay its way in addition to the aca- 
demic work. 

This is a wise step. It makes the salary paid to teacher 
less than last :vear by the sum S18.34, and this does not take 
into consideration any tuition that will be collected from 
students under accademic work. 

Our boarding department has enrolled 47 students as com- 
pared with 27 with the entire year for last year. Already 
enough students have made application to completely take 
our dormitory accommodations. The total enrollment to date 
is 84 students. 

Also a brief financial statement of the first two months of 
this year is: 

To tuition collected .___ $466 18 

'' uncollected 140 73 

'' 2-9 of $700.00 from the Home Board __._ 155 50 



$ 762 41 
To teachers' salaries paid for 1st and 2nd 

months _„_____ „„____ 656 00 



Difference, $ 106 41 



Green River Baptist Association, 19 



Winter time is coming- and wood is to buy so that will 
change this, 

W. F, Flack, Sec. and Treas. 

The following amounts have been received to credit of the 
school debt since last Association. 

Robert Hughes .-- $ 25 00 

C. M. Lewis .__...-_ 25 00 

Rev. D. J Hunt-__ . 10 00 

A. F. Geer „„-..„-..__..__-____ „_„ 10 00 

J. M. Gibson „ 5 00 

N. M. Ponder „ 5 00 

Mrs. Lee Taylor _„ „„.„.. 1 00 

Robert Davis . 1 00 

W, 0. Geer „„„„__.__.._.. __. 1 00 

J. A. Hensley „.-._... 1 00 

H. P. Rucker ._._.„ „ 1 00 

Edgar Nanney . 1 00 

E. P. White „ _._ ._„ 20 00 

G. C. Lawrence .._____ . „ _„_ 10 00 

T. C. Nanney ___.. 14 00 

W.F. Flack 100 00 

F. 0. Simmons 5 00 

J. M. Pendergrass _„- ._» 5 00 

Total $240 00 

If any one has paid and no credit above please notify the 
Secretary, 

Report on Time, Place and Preacher. 

Your Gommittee recommends the following: Time of meet- 
ing Thursday before the first Sunday in October 1919. Place 
Camp Greek 5 miles East of Union Mills. Preacher for An- 
nual Sermon Rev. M. M. Huntley. 

G. F. Keeter, 

A. R. BUFFALOE, 

D. G. Nanney, Com. 
Report on Ministerial Relief. 

It may well be said that all great men who are really and 
truly great, and whose lives are worth while to the world, 
owe their greatness and their success to Christianity. 

Christianity, morality and civilization are debtors to the 
humble preacher of the Gospel. The realization of these 
blessings is largely the fruits of his labors. 



20 Minutes of the 



Ingratitude is one of the most reprehensible sins of which 
we may be guilty, and yet our Church statistics on contribu- 
tions to aged ministers relief throw defiantly into our faces 
undisputable evidence of our guilt. 

It is written, ""How beautiful are the feet of them that 
preach the Gospel of peace, and bring glad tidings of good 
things." It has been the faithful preacher of God's v/ord 
who has brought the "Glad tidings of good things," and by 
his preaching he has made us the professed followers of 
Christ, to rejoice in God's goodness and mercy toward us, 
and yet, on account of our unmind fullness of the blessings 
which we have received as the result of his faithful labors, 
we ignore his wants, disregard the call to duty, unheed the 
voice of God and neglect to minister to him \\ ho has so 
faithfully and so long, in the prime of his life, and in the 
vigor of his manhood, ministered to us. Ingratitude must be 
at our door pointing the accusing finger at us, and we can 
not say nay. 

Our prayers should go up to God to forgive us for our 
neglect in the discharge of the great and important duty of 
supporting and caring for our old and infirm preachers who 
have given their lives in the service of their Master for the 
advancement of His Kingdom, and for the salvation of 
human souls, and the betterment of humanity. 

The pitiful sum of $56.37 contributed last year by the 
great and powerful Christian organization— the Green River 
Baptist Association — for this worthy cause should bring to 
the face of every loyal Baptist within the bounds of the As- 
sociation a blush of shame and remorse, one so intense that 
no escape may be found from it till we fully realize and dis- 
charge this great duty. 

Our statistics show that we paid about $20.00 less last year 
than in 1916, and the whole State of North Carolina only 
paid last year $6240.49, only about $100.00 to each minister 
receiving benefit from this fund. 

Your Committee, therefore, respectfully recommends that 
the collection on each fifth Sunday during the year be set 
apart by the Sunday Schools of the Association for this wor- 
thy cause, and that each pastor in the Association preach at 
least one sermon during the year in behalf of this worthy 
cause, and that where no Sunday Schools are conducted that 
there be two or more collections taken each year for this 
purpose, and that in no Church the contributions to this fund 
be less than 5 per cent of the pastor's salary. 

Respectfully submitted, M. L. Edwards, Chm. 



Green River Baptist Association, 21 

Report of the Tliomasvi81e Baptist Orphanageo 

Thirt3^-four years ago this institution began its blessed 
ministry- Between that date and the present nearly two 
thousand boys and girls have entered its friendly doors. 
The present physical valuation of that plant is over $415, 000. 00 
but as its aim and purpose has never been to make money, 
but men, it is im^possibie to estimate its value. As one life 
lived in relation with God is of more value than all the world 
in like proportions, as this institution has touched the lives 
of these hundreds for good shall we r^^te its value. Yerily, 
there is no more potent influence for good amongst the 
Baptists of the State than the Thomasville Baptist Orphan- 
age. In all our denominational work there is no more wor- 
thy appeal, and no place where a Baptist can make a wiser 
investment of God's money. I know of no other place in 
North Carolina outside of the best Christain home where 
high idealism is so dominant. The controlling motive, the 
ruling passion is to make men and women. Contributions to 
this institution will be wisely safeguarded and so invested as 
to get the best results. 

There are nearly 500 children in this institution nov/, 82 
of whom are at the Kennedy Home in Lenoir County. This 
home comprises a large tract of some twelve hundred acres 
of splendid farming land and is the princely gift of Mr. 
and Mrs W. L. Kennedy. The cash receipts for last year 
Vv^ere over $8,000.00, This farm with the Thomasville plant 
and other physical equipment and endowment go to make 
up the total valuation ($415,402,07. ) 

Last year was a great year in the history of the institu- 
tion. More than J'83,000.00 came into the current fund for 
the support of the children. Every dollar of this came from 
the freewill offerings of the Churches. This is the fund 
from which the expenses are met. More than ?48,000.00 
was received from other sources making the grand total re- 
ceipts for the year $132,034.64. With these facts let us 
thank God and take courage. The present cost of ea«h 
child per month is $12.12. 

Not nearly all the children are there who want to go and 
ought to go. We fear the cost of living has not yet reached 
the crest of the tide. With others coming in and the cost of liv- 
ing still soaring we shall need more funds next year than this. 
Out of the unprecedented profits incident to the war we are 
making money as never before. Let us prove ourselves 
good stewards of God's money, and give more largely than 
ever before. We therefore urge: 



22 Minutes of the 



1. That every Sunday School in the Association make an 
offering to the Orphanage every first Sunday. 

2. That every Sunday School take a club of at least ten 
copies of Charity and Children, our Orphanage organ. 

3. That every Church make a Thank Offering at or near 
the Sunday next nearest to Thanksgiving Day, stressing the 
One Day's Work feature. 

Respectfully submitted, A. K Buffaloe, 

Sosid^V Sciiool Heport. 

The Sunday School Work is one of the most important 
branches of Church vi^ork, and is fast becoming recognized 
as such. The progress and growth v^hich the Church is 
making can largely be ascertained by an examination of its 
Sunday School. A Church without a Sunday School is at 
least dormant, for it is by the Sunday School that the Church 
grows and develops, and it is through this medium, to a very 
large extent, that God's , Kingdom is advanced in the com- 
munity. 

Notwithstanding this very important truth we find from 
the Sunday School reports of last year that seven churches 
in our Association have no Sunday Schools; and some others 
have none during the winter months. The reports will also 
show that the Churches which have an evergreen Sunday 
School are the Churches which are contributing most to all 
the departments of Church work, and are likewise the 
Churches which are developing and doing most for His King- 
dom. 

We are sorry to note also that there was not half of our 
Church membership in Sunday School last year. We con- 
sider the best method to increase Sunday School member- 
ship to be, better efficiency in Sunday School work, and we, 
therefore, recommend that the Sunday Schools of the Asso- 
ciation be organized, and graded- as far as it is possible; 
that the very best and most efficient teachers be procured; 
that the Sunday School be under the control and manage- 
ment of the Church; that special days be given to the ex- 
tention of the membership of the Sunday School; that 
children's day be observed in all of the Sundav Schools; that 
each Church in the Association have an evergreen or all- 
year Sunday School, and that all the Churches of the Associa- 
tion subscribe to Charity and Children to be furnished to 
the Sunday School by the club method. 
Respectfully submitted, 

H. P, RuckER, Chm. 



Green River Baptist Association. 23 



We the delegates and visitors of the Green River Associa- 
tion, in session, desire to record our deep appreciation of 
the bounteous and generous provision for our creature com- 
forts, and that v/e tender a vote of thanks to Piedmont and 
Rutherfordton Churches for same. 

The Delegates Present. 

CONSTiTUTION, 

No. 1. This Association shall be known as the Green 
River Baptist Association, and shall be composed of Baptist 
Churches v/hose articles of Faith and Constitutions are in 
harmony with those of the Association. 

No. 2. The membership shall be composed of delegates 
elected by the Churches connected with this body, and all 
ordained ministers who are members of, or working as pas- 
tors in connection with said Churches, and each Church 
shall be allov/ed a representation of two delegates for fifty 
members, and every Church of over fifty members shall be 
allowed one additional delegate for every additional fifty 
members. 

No. 3. The primary object of the Association shall be to 
encourage and support Wake Forest College, to educate 
young men called of God to the Ministry and approved by 
the Churches to vv^hich they belong; to encourage education 
among the people of the State; to support the Gospel in the 
destitute portions of the State and of the Southern Baptist 
Convention, to send the Gospel to the nations that have it 
not; to encourage the distribution, and study of the Bible 
and a sound rehgious literature to assist Baptist Churches 
in the erection of houses of worship, to encourage the proper 
care of indigent orphan children, and destitute and aged 
ministers of the Gospel, to encourage the organization and 
support of Baptist Sunday Schools, and to co-operate with 
the Baptist State Convention in all its departments of labor. 

No. 4. The Association shall meet annually on Thursday 
before the first Sabbath in October. 

No. 5. The officers of the Association shall be a Modera- 
tor, Vice-Moderator, Clerk and Treasurer, who shall be elected 
by the Association and continue in office until their sucessors 
are elected. 

No. 6. The Moderator shall preside, or fill the chair, by 
calling some member of the body thereto, and enforce order 
in accordance with Mell's Parliamentary Practice. 



24 Minutes of the 

No, 7. The Clerk shall record the proceedings,conduct the 
correspondence, and publish and distribute the Minutes. 

No. 8. The Treasurer shall receive all funds contributed 
by the Churches or individuals to the object of the Associa- 
tion, receipting the contributors for the same; and forward 
all contributions to their proper destination, and make a full 
report of all receipts and disbursements to the Association 
at its annual session, and on retiring from his ofiice turn 
over to his successor all moneys, papers and books belonging 
thereto. 

No. 9, There shall be appointed by the Association at 
each session a Board of Missions and Sunday Schools, con- 
sisting of one member from each Church belonging to the 
Association, and other brethren living in Rutherfordton or 
its immediate vicinity, five of whom shall constitute a quo- 
rum, w^hich during the intervals between the meetings of 
the Associations, shall have charge of the various interests 
and objects fostered by the Association, and shall encourage 
the churches to give liberally thereto, and shall make a full 
report of its work including such suggestions relative thereto 
as it may think advisable to the Association at its annual 
sessions. 

No. 10. The President, or in case of his death or disqualifi- 
cation, any three members of the Board may call a meeting" 
thereof. 

No. 11- This Constitution may be changed or amended at 
any annual session by two-thirds of the representatives 
voting in the affirmative. 



ASSOCIATION COVENANT. 

Article 1. We believe in one only and true God, and that 
there are three persons in the Godhead — the Father, the Son, 
and Holy Ghost, and these are one in substance, and equal 
in power and glory. 

Article 2. We believe the Scriptures of Old and New Tes- 
taments are the Word of God, and the only rule of faith and 
practice. 

Article 3. We believe in the doctrine of original sin. 

Article 4. We believe in man's impotency to recover him- 
self from the fallen state he is in by his own free will and 
ability. 



Green River Baptist Association. 25 

^ Article 5. We believe that sinners are justified in the 
sight of God only through the imputed righteousness of Jesus 
Christ. 

Article 6. We believe the saints shall persevere in grace, 
and that they never shall finally fall away. 

Article 7. We believe that Baptism and the Lord's Sup- 
per are ordinances instituted by Christ and that true be- 
lievers are the only proper subjects thereof. 

Article 8. We believe that immersion is the only Scriptu- 
ral mode of Baptism. 

Article 9. We believe that no person has a right to ad- 
minister the ordinances but such as are regularly called and 
qualified thereto. 

Article 10. We believe in the resurrection of the dead, 
and a general judgment; that the punishment of the wicked 
shall be everlasting, and the joys of the righteous eternal. 

Article 11. We, the members of the Green River Baptist 
Association, agreeing to the above Articles of Faith, do, for 
and in behalf of the Churches which we represent, covenant 
and agree and give ourselves up to each other in Church and 
Christian fellowship, in order to keep up the unity of the 
spirit in the bonds of peace, and to assist each other in all 
matters of distress and to pray for each others prosperity. 





Old Fort 

Piney Knob. 

Pleasant Grove 

Pleasant Hill 

Pea Ridge. 

Piedmont 

Packolet 

Rock Spring 

Round Hill .. 

Rutherfordton 

Stone Mountain... 

Sunny Vale_ 

Silver Creek 

Turkey Cove 

Whiteside Valley.. 

Woodlavsrn. ._ 

ZionHill 




\ 


H R Freeman 

Grady Nanney 

M M Huntley 

J M Walker 

BMHamrick 

N'LWright:'/."" 
J A McKaughan .. 
J A McKaughan .. 

swshuford".".:::: 

A P Sorrels. 

T A Drake 


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Union Mills 

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TREASURER'S REPORT. 



CHURCHES. 


ii 

si 
Ii 


CD 

C 
cS 

a 
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Ii 




to 

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1 


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6 


Bethel $ 


$ 


$ 


?- 

3 00 
1 00 


$ 


$ 


$ 


'"2 '60 

2 00 

1 50 

1 80 

93 

35 


$ — 


Beulah 


2 00 
4 55 
6 60 
2 00 


2 00 


2 00 


3 00 




1 05 


BilFsCreek 

Camp Cre-k 




3 00 

4 00 


2 00 
2 00 


2 50 
2 00 


22 50 
3 00 




"i'oo 


Chapel Hill 




6 00 
























1 30 
4 40 
1 10 

1 08 

2 50 

1 40 

2 50 
2 00 
1 50 
1 15 






















Prtlnmhim 










12 00 
2 50 
1 00 




. 




Cooper's Gap 

Clinchfield 


""3"00 


5 10 

5 00 

6 60 

'""3'00 




2 50 
4 84 


2 50 
4 00 


2 50 
1 50 


"i'50 


Dysartsville 

East Marion 

Glenwood 

Green Hill 






1 65 


6 60 

'"'s'oo 


' 6 60 

""'s'oo 


5 50 
""§'00 




2 64 


Rail Town 


















Harmony Grove-. - 

Hickory Grove 

Macedonia 




1 79 
6 00 
5 00 


1 33 

5 00 












1 65 
1 80 

1 25 

""i'oo 

2 65 

3 10 
3 45 
6 05 

50 

70 

2 00 




7 00 
5 00 


6 00 
5 00 


5 00 
5 00 








Mafion Second 








1 00 
11 00 
15 00 


1 50 

12 00 

8 00 


1 50 
14 71 
8 00 




Mill Spring 

MontfordsCove 





"'"4"50 



















"""2"50 


""40 




Mt. View 

Mt. Pleasant 

Nebo 


-— 


4 00 
100 


i 00 
1 00 


3 00 


3 00 
1 00 




Old Fort 


















Piney Knob. 

Pleasant Hill 

Pleasant Grove 

Pea Ridg-e 

Piedmont 





1 13 
15 00 

9 00 

2 50 


"3"85 
2 56 


i 13 
15 00 

5 00 
2 50 

4 44 

5 00 


113 
10 00 

""2'50 

4 50 

5 00 


1 13 
12 00 

5 90 

2 50 
4 50 
7 00 


"6'90 

■ii'2o 


70 
3 00 
1 20 

1 00 

2 10 
1 90 
6 40 




Rock Spring 

Round Hill 




10 00 


3 00 




Rutherfordton 


1 


































Silver Creek 




















Sunny Vale 




































2 00 
20 




Whiteside Valley 


















Woodlawn- .-. 




2 75j 






2 75 






Total 


$ 3 00 


$ 103 52I 28 30 $ 100 01 


$ 91 23 


$ 115 99 


$22 50 


$~~69"66 


$ 6 19 



W. ft. HflRRILL, Treasurer. 



MILLER HARDWARE CO.. 

DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 

Hardware and Building Maierlal. 

RUTHERFORDTON, N. C, 



HARDWARE SPECIALTIES: 

Oil CooK stoves, all Kinds of Iron Heaters and 
Ranges; Enamel and Aluminum Ware. 

We carry at all times a full line of 

BUILDERS' MATERIAL AND FARM IMPLEMENTS, 



Come in and see us when you are in town, and we can assure 
you of fair and courteous treatment. 

MILL&R HARDWARE 60.. ■ - Ruttierfordton. N. 6. 

We Solicit your Business, Courtesy Shown ail Customers. 
An Account with us will help you on a Rainy Day. 

PEOPLE^S BANK, 

UNION MILLS, N. C. 

OFFICERS : DIRECTORS : 

J. D. Morris, Pres. J. D, Morris, Dr. L. D. Allen, 

W. C. Tate, Vice-Pres. W. F. Flack, E. L. Morris, 
W. F, Flack, Cashier. W, C. Tate, M. L. Sorrels. 

C. F. Nanney, W. G, Harris. 



Levi Department Stores Co., 

RUTHERFORDTON, N. C, 

OBALERS IN 

Dry Goods, Notions, Clothing 1 Hats. 

MILLINERY AND LADIES' FURNISHINGS. 

Furniture, Groceries AND Hardware. 

COUNTRY PRODUCE BOUGHT AND SOLD. 



C. L. MILLER, President. W. W. HICKS, Cashier. 

H. L. CARPENTER Vice-Pres. C. B. WILSON. Ass't Cashier 

Ctti3en^s Bank a Zvmt Co.. 

RUTHERFORDTON. N. C. 



Resources. October 16th, 1918. 

Loans and Discounts $183,502.30 

Banking House 7,000.00 

Furniture and Fixtures.. 3,044.02 

U. S. Bonds and W. S. S, 4,528.80 

Real Estate 725.00 

Cash in Vault and due from Banks_ 133,858.80 
Outside Collections _.._ 14.594 30 

Total $347,253.22 

Liabilities: 

Capital $30,000.00 

Surplus and Profits 7,415,40 

Certified Checks 403.00 

Bills Payable 10,000.00 

Deposits 299,434.82 

Total $347,253.22 

DIRECTORS: OFFICERS: 

C, L. Miller J. F. Flack C. F. Cline Collett L. Miller, President 

W. L. Long C. D. Geer R. L. Hampton H. L. Carpenter, Vice-President 

W.M.Whiteside, Jr. W.W. Hicks Dr. M. H. Big-gs T. F. Oats. Assistant Cashier 

Kenneth S. Tanner H. L. Carpenter F. F Cobb, Asst. Cashier, 

Spindale Branch 



Wfi SELI^ AT . 

StriGily One FrlG6 to EveroDody, 

And Business is Fine, Ice Water in Summer, 

Good Fires in Winter. Spend the day with us. 

H. L. CARPENTER. 
ONE PRICE VARIETY STORE, - Rutherfordton, N. C, 



m^ 



ir YOU WANT TO SAVE MONEY 

don't forget that 

Keeter's Hardware Store 

RUTHERFORDTON. N. C. 
Is the Best Place to Buy 

ttflRDWflRE AND flUTO FIXTURES. 

And the Best Automobile on the Market. 

If you don't believe it, ask the Preacher. 

BUY YOUR GOODS fJT HOME. 

WE SELL 

Mens^ and Boys' Clothing. 

Ladies' Coat Suits and Skirts, Dress Goods of all kinds, 
Star Brand Shoes for Men, Ladies and Children, made 
out of Leather. 

We are exclusive Agents for Warner's Guaranteed Corsets. 
Our prices are a little cheaper. Come in and let us show you. 

JttGDftNIEL. SAUNDERS 60., - - Rultiertordlon. N. 6. 

ft Bank flCGOuni) Makes uou inflGDendeni 

There is not a Farmer in this County who should not have 
a Bank Account. If you have bills to pay, whether they be 
large or small, your check will pay them and you will always 
have the right change. It would be a pleasure to have your 
name on our books. 

THE COMMERCIAL BANK, 

Dr. Worth Thompson, Pres., N. C. Harris, Vice-Pres., 

H. H. Harrill, Cashier. 



■■■••■•■■SBaBaataaaBBBBBcaaaaBCBiaaaaaaaaa ■>■■■««■■■>■ ■■■■■■■•■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ 

■■■aaaaaBaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaBaaBaaaaaBaaaaaBaaBaaBaBaaaaBaaaaaaaaaBaBaaa 

MINUTES 

OF THE 

SEVENTY-NINTH ANNUAL SESSION 

OF THE 

NORTH CAROLINA GREEN RIVER 

BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

HELD WITH 

CAMP CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH 
OCTOBER 2, 3, and 4th, 1919 

OFFICERS 

Moderator M. L. Edwards 

Vice Moderator ^__ A. P. Sorrels 

Clerk J. A. McKaughan 

Treasurer W. A. Harrill 

Notice to Church Treasurers: Take monthly offerings for 
Missions. Send it ^direct to Walter Durham, Raleigh, N. C. Take 
monthly offerings for the Orphanage. Send it to F. B. Hamrick, 
, Thomasvillte, N. C. 

To Church Clerks: See Resolution on close of Association 
year, and sending in Church letter to Clerk of Association. 

Next session will be held with Old Fort Church, Old Fort, N. 
C, beginning Thursday before 1st Sunday in October, 1920. 

The Sun Printing Co. Print. Rutherfordton. N.C. 

• ■■■a ■•■■■■■•■••■■■■■■••■■■•■■■*■■■■■■■■■■■■■ ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■•■■■■^■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■i 
>•■••■■■■■■■■■•■■>■■■•■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ ■■■■■•■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■•■■•■■■■■■■■■■■■■I 



CHURCH GROUPS FOR 5TH SUNDAY CONVENTIONS 

Group 1 — J. T. Bowden and J. T. Tyler, Leader; Armstrong-^ 
Bethel Bethlehem, Chapel Hill, Cherry Springs, Clear Creek, 
Clinchfield, Dysartsville, East Marion, Glenwood, Greenlee, Har- 
mony Grove, Macedonia, Marion First, Marion Second, Nebo, Old 
Fort, Stone Mountain, Turkey Cove, Woodlawn, Sunney Vale. 

Group 2 — J. A. McKaughan and J. M. Brown, Leaders; Bill's 
Creek, Camp Creek, Green Hill, Montford's Cove, Mt. Creek, Mt. 
Vernon, Mt. View, Mt. Pleasant, Piney Knob, Pleasant Grove,. 
Pleasant Hill, Piedmont, Rock Spring, Round Hill» Rutherf ordton„ 
Whitesides Valley. 

Group 3 — E. J. Jones and J. B. Arledge, Leaders; Beulah„ 
Big Level, Cane Creek, Cooper's Gap, Columbus, Mill Spring, Pea 
Ridge, Packolett, Silver Creek. 

EXECUTIVE BOARD OF MISSIONS 

Edwards, M. L. Rutherfordton, N. C\. 

Keeter, C. W. -i Rutherfordton, N. C. 

Bowden, J. T. Marion, N. C. 

Geer, R. P. Rutherfordton, N. C. 

Brown, E. S. Nealsville, N. C. 

Sorrels, A. P. Union Mills, N. C. 

Taylor, J. Lloyd Rutherfordton, N. C. 

McKaughan, J. A. Rutherfordton, N. C. 

Million Dollars Campaign — J. A. McKaughan, Chairman. 
Member State Board of Mission from this Association, J. A. 
McKaughan. 

TRUSTEES ROUND HILL SCHOOL 

Edwards, M. L., (Chairman) Rutherfordton, N. C. 

Flack, W. F. _ Union Mills, N. C. 

McKaughan, J. A. Rutherfordton, N. C. 

Morris, J. D. Union Mills, N. C. 

Harrill, W. A. Rutherfordton, N. C. 

Brown, J. M. ^ ^ Nealsville, N. C. 

Justice, M. L. Rutherfordton, N. C. 

Tyler, J. M. Marion, N. C. 

Flaek, M. P. Vein Mountain, N. C. 



STANDING COMMITTEES ON REPORTS FOR NEXT YEAR 

State Missions— E. W. Church, Old Fort, N. C. 

Home Missions — J. T. Bowden, Marion, N. C. 

Foreign Missions- — J. M. Brown, Nealsville, N. C. 

Sunday Schools — E. J. Jones, Tryon, N. C. 

Christian Education — A. P. Sorrels, Union Mills, N. C. 

Round Hill School— A. C. Warlick, Union Mills, N. C. 

Orphanage — T. A. Drake, Nebo, N. C. 

Pastoral Fields — R. G. Short. 

Ministerial Relief — J. M. Tyler, Marion, N. C. 

75 Million Dollar Campaign and Million Dollar School Fund — J. 

A. McKaughan, Rutherfordton, N. C. 
Periodicals — J. Q. A. Michael, Marion, N. C. 

ORDAINED MINISTERS 

Bowden, J. T. Marion, N. C. 

Brown, J. M. Nealsville, N. C. 

Church, E. W. Old Fort, N. C. 

Champion, R. C. Landrum, S. C. 

Drake, T. A. Nebo, N. C. 

Hodge, J. L. Rutherfordton, N. C. 

Hudson, E. V. Louisville, Ky. 

Haynes, W. L. Rutherfordton, N. C. 

Jones, E. J. Tryon, N. C. 

Jones, Lee Marion, N. C. 

Lowd«rmilk, D. P. Marion, N. C. 

Laughter, B. C. Mill Spring, N. C. 

McDaniel, T. C. Cliffside, N. C. 

McKaughan, J. A. Rutherfordton, N. C. 

McMahan, W. F. Old Fort, N. C. 

Nelon, J. A. Uree, N. C. 

Nanney, Grady Wake Forest, N. C. 

Short, R. G. Marion, N. C. 

Sorrels, A. P. Union Mills, N. C. 

Simmons, F. L. Nebo^ N. C. 

Snypes, M.V. Nebo, N. C. 

Shuford, S. W. Woodlawn, N. C. 

White, E. P. Rutherfordton, N. C. 

For Preachers Loan Library Address, Rev. O. A. Allison, 
West Liberty, Ky. 



ASSOCIATE TRUSTEES 

Shuford, S. W., Rev. Woodlawn, N. C. 

Raburn, W/. C. Vein Mountain, N. C. 

Silver, J. M. Old Fort, N. C. 

Mills, T. F. Mill Spring, N. C. 

McDaniel, J. C. Uree, N. C. 

Guffey, J. C. Union Mills, N. C. 

Harris, L. A. Mill Spring, N. C. 

Simmons, F. L., Rev. Nebo, N. C. 

Gilliam, C. E. Old Fort, N. C. 

Patton, Melvin Old Fort, N. C. 

Lamb, R. M. Marion, N. C. 

Biddy, J. W. Mill Spring, N. C. 

Hill, H. W. Columbus, N. C. 

Taylor, W. H. Dysartsville, N. C. 

Boggs, J. H. Marion, N. C. 

Brown, E. S. Nealsville, N. C. 

Jones, J. P. Rutherfordton, N. C. 

Ledbetter, M. D. Old Fort, N. C. 

Withrow, W. F. Marion, N. C. 

Gallon, J. A. Vein Mountain, N. C. 

Short, R. G., Rev. Marion, N. C. 

Jackson, Frank Mill Spring, N. C. 

Hemphill, G. H. Union Mills, N. C. 

Rucker, H. P. Gilkey, N. C. 

Walker, S. G. Rutherfordton, N. C. 

McCrain, H. H. ^ Mill Spring, N. C. 

Wilson, R. O. Nebo, N. C. 

Hughes, R. F. Old Fort, N. C. 

Ledbetter, R. Uree, N. C. 

Lovelace, C. C. Rutherfordton, N. C. 

Newman, B. B. Mill Spring, N. C. 

Callahan, G. A. Rutherfordton, N. C. 

Panther, J. T. Lynn, N. C. 

Earley, O. D. Mill Spring, N. C. 

Nanney, R. C. Old Fort, N. C. 

Arledge, N. B. 2 Mill Spring, N. C. 

Padgett, J. P. Busic, N. C. 

Nanney, G. Uree, N. C. 

West, G. W. Woodlawn, N. C. 



4 GREEN RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

PROCEEDINGS 

Union Mills, N. C, October 2d, 1919. 

The North Carolina Green River Baptist Association met in 
its Seventy-ninth Annual Session with Camp Creek Baptist church 
in Rutherford county at 11 o'clock a. m., and was called to order 
by the Vice Moderator, Rev. A. P. Sorrels. The introductory 
sermon was preached by Rev. M. M. Huntley, pastor of Pleasant 
Hill and Muntfords Cove Baptist churches, from 2 Corinthians 8.9' 
Subject: "Christ's Poverty — Christian Riches." 

Letters were tabulated and delegates and pastors enrolled 
from the churches as follows : 

DELEGATES 
Armstrong — S. W. Shuford, (Pastor.) 
Bethel — W. C. Raburn, M. C. Morgan. 
Bethlehem — J. M. Silver, Jas. Bright. 
Beulah — 

Big Level — Grover Green, Willy Gilbert, T. F. Mills. 
Bills Creek— J. C. McDaniel, W. C. Dalton. 

Camp Creek — J. B. Condry, J. C. Guffy, Glenn Barns, J. A. Cle- 
ments. 
Cane Creek — Solon Biddy, L. A. Harris. 
Chapel Hill — F. L. Simmons, (Pastor.) 
Cherry Springs — C. E. Gilliam. 
Clear Creek — Ervin Mason, Lee Quinn, M. L. McMahan, Melvin^ 

Patton. 
Clinchfield— R. M. Lamb. 
Cooper's Gap — J. W. Biddy. 
Columbus — N. T. Mills. 

Dysartsville — W. H. Taylor, J. A. Daves, J. M. Sisk. 
East Marion — J. H. Boggs. 
Glenwood — M. O. Biggerstaff. 
Green Hill — J. A. Rucker. 

Greenlee — M. D. Ledbetter, J. O. Pendergrass. 
Harmony Grove — J. B. Lawing, W. W. Huskins, J. S. Spratt.. 
Macedonia — Geo. F. Rhone, J. A. Gallon. 
Marion First — J. M. Tyler, J. Q. A. Michael. 
Marion Second — R. G. Short, (Pastor.) 
Mill Spring — Frank Jackson. 
Montford's Cove— G. H. Hemphill, J. H. Burghess, M. A. Hall,. 

Earl Hall. 
Mountain Creek — N. Lloyd Hampton, A. F. Geer, Coron Bridges, 

Loran Johnson. 
Mt. Vernon— E. H. Logan, J. J. Rollins, Wm. Hudson, John Wells,. 

Ambers Crotts. 



GREEN RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 5 



Mt. Pleasant — By letter. 

Mountain View — H. D. Jackson, J. T. Jackson. 

Nebo — Edwin Brinkley. 

Old Fort — R. F. Hughes, Luster Harris, Nanie Nichols. 

Piney Knob — Not represented. 

Pleasant Grove — W. H. Mclntyre, R. Ledbetter. 

Pleasant Hill — D. C. Nanney. 

Pea Ridge — B. B. Newman, W. G. Green, 0. W. Ponder, P. B. 

Davis. 
Piedmont— J. B. Flynn, W. M. Griswold, O. H. Hill, C. W. Hodge. 
Packolett— J. T. Panther. 
Rock Spring — G. W. Whitesides. 
Round Hill — J. L. Barnes, F. I. Nanney, C. H. Krause, Millard 

Shytles, A. P. Nanney. 
Rutherfordton — M. L. Edwards, J. L. Taylor, A. R. Yelton, C. W. 

Keeter, W. A. Harrill. 
Stone Mountain — R. C. Nanney. 
Silver Creek — By letter. 
Sunny Vale — By letter. 
Turkey Cove — S. W. Shuford, (Pastor.) 
Whitesides Valley— F. L. Shytle. 
Woodlawn— G. W. West. 

PASTORS 

J. T. Bowden, J. M. Brown, E. W. Church, T. A. Drake, H. R. 
Freeman, J. L. Hodge, M. M. Huntley, E. J. Jones, J. A. Mc- 
Kaughan, W. F. McMahan, R. G. Short, A. P. Sorrels, F. L. Sim- 
mons, S. W. Shuford, J. H. Smith, E. P. White. 

The Association then proceeded by motion of Bro. R. G. 
Short to the election of officers which resulted as follows: 

Moderator — M. L. Edwards. 

Vice Moderator — Rev. A. P. Sorrels. 

Clerk — J. A. McKaughan. 

Treasurer — W. A. Harrill. 

The Moderator appointed the following committee on Order 
of Business: J. H. Smith, Pastor Camp Creek Church; E. J. 
Jones, and J. A. McKaughan. 

On motion of Bro. Smith the body adjourned to 2 o'clock, 
p. m. 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

The Association convened at 2 p. m., and was opened with 
singing and prayer by Rev. H. R. Freeman. 

The committee reported on Order of Business, and after 
some changes the report was adopted. 

The following visiting Brethren, Archibald Johnson, repre- 



GREEN RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



senting the Thomasville Baptist Orphanage, and Rev. W. R. 
Beach, representing the Biblical Recorder, and Rev. G. P. Bostic, 
missionary to China, were recognized by the Moderator and wel- 
comed to a seat in the body. 

REPORT ON THE ORPHANAGE 

The report on the Orphanage was read by Bro. R. G. Short, 
and on motion the report was adopted. Pending the adoption of 
the report it was discussed by Archibald Johnson, R. G. Short, 
and A. P. Sorrels. (See report.) 

Pending the report on Periodicals and the adoption of the 
same the subject was discussed by Rev. W. R. Beach and Rev. R. 
G. Short. (See report.) 

Armstrong church having been dismissed from the Green 
River Association at a previous .session, and not having united 
with any other Association, and requesting to remain a member 
of the Green River Association was, on motion was restored to 
membership in this body. 

It was moved and carried that the trustees of Round Hill 
School prepare a Resolution inviting and requesting the Catawba 
River and South Fork Associations to adopt Round Hill School as 
their school, and to appoint a committee to present the resolution 
to the above named Associations. And the committee to report 
the result to the Trustees. 

After the appointment of homes for the delegates by the 
pastor, and some announcements, on motion the Association ad- 
journed with prayer to meet Friday at 9 :30 a. m. 
FRIDAY MORNING 

The Association was called to order by the Moderator at 
9 :45 o'clock, and Bro. J. Q. A. Michael lead in an inspiring song 
service, and Brethren G. P. Bostic and J. W. Crow led in prayer. 

The/ Moderator then recognized and welcomed to the body 
Rev. W. A. Smith, pastor Pritchard Memorial Baptist church, 
Charlotte, and J. W. Crow, Asheville, representing Christian 
Education. 

REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS 

The report on Sunday School was presented by Bro. J. Lloyd 
Taylor, and on motion was adopted. Pending the adoption the 
report was discussed by Bros. Taylor, J. Q. A. Michael, J. W. 
Crow, H. R. Freeman, and G. P. Bostic. (See report.) 

REPORT ON PASTORAL FIELDS AND CO-OPERATION 

The subject was presented verbally by Bro. A. P. Sorrels, 
chairman of committee on Pastoral Fields and Co-operation. The 
subject was then defered to the afternoon session for further 
consideration. 



GREEN RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 7 

REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS 

The report on Foreign Missions was read by Bro. J. T. Bow- 
den. Pending the motion to adopt, the report was discussed by 
Bro. G. P. Bostic, and then on motion was adopted. (See report) 

The further discussion and consideration of Pastoral Fields 
and Co-operation was then taken up. Bro. J. T. Bowden made a 
stiring and inspiring speech on the need of more sympathetic and 
active co-operation by the churches. Bro. W. A. Smith presented 
" workable plan for forming Pastoral Fields and locating pastors, 
which was supported by splendid talks by E. W. Church and J. W. 
Crow. 

On motion Brethren A. P. Sorrels, J. T. Bowden, and J. H. 
Smith, were appointed to present to the Association a resolution 
embodying a plan for forming Pastoral Fields. (See resolution.) 

The new pastors, J. T. Bowden, E. J. Jones, J. M. Brown, E. 
W. Church, and S. W. Shuford, were introduced to the Associa- 
tion by J. A. McKaughan. 

The Moderator appointed a committee viz: R. G. Short, J. 
M. Brown, and J. B. Flynn, to nominate the Executive Mission 
Board. 

On motion the body then adjourned with prayer to meet at 
2 p. m. 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

The Association met according to adjournment, and was 
opened with song and prayer service. 

Brthren J. Q. A. Michael, J. Lloyd Taylor, and N. T. Mills 
were appointed a committee on time, place, and preacher. 
REPORT ON HOME MISSIONS 

The report on Home Missions was read by J. A. McKaughan, 
and on motion adopted without discussion. (See report.) 
REPORT ON STATE MISSIONS 

The report on State Mission was read by A. P. Sorrels, and 
on motion adopted without discussion. 

REPORT ON MINISTERIAL RELIEF 

The report on Ministerial Relief was read by J. M. Brown, 
and adopted without discussion. 

The reports on Home and State Mission and Ministerial Re- 
lief were adopted without discussion because of the need of time 
for the consideration and discussion of the 75 Million Dollar Cam- 
paign, and they were given consideration in that. 

On motion the 75 Million Dollar Campaign was then taken 
up, and ably and interestingly presented by Rev. W. A. Smith, 
Rev. E. W. Church, and Rev. J. T. Bowden. 

The Association then unanimously voted to accept the allot- 
ment of $50,000.00 which had been alloted to the Green River As- 



8 GREEN RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

sociation by the Central Committee at Raleigh as its part of the 

75 Million Dollars to be raised in the Southern Baptist convention. 

REPORT ON TIME, PLACE, AND PREACHER 

We your committee beg to recommend the following: Time 
of meeting, Thursday before 1st Sunday in October 1920. Place, 
Old Fort, and preacher, Rev. J. T. Bowden, alternate Rev. E. J. 
Jones, It was moved and carried that the report be adopted. 
NOMINATION OF EXECUTIVE BOARD OF MISSIONS 

We your committee on nomination of Executive Board of 
Missions beg to name the following, and on motion the report was 
adopted. (See Executive Board of Missions.) 

The report on Million Dollar School Fund was read by J. A. 
McKaughan, and on motion adopted. (See report.) 

By motion the body then adjourned to meet Saturday morn- 
ing at 9:30 o'clock. 

SATURDAY MORNING SESSION 

The Association met at 9 :45 o'clock, and was called to order 
by the Moderator, and opened with an inspiring song and prayer 
service. 

The Minutes of yesterday were read and corrected. 

The report on Round Hill School was read by Prof. A. C. 
Warlick. On motion the report was adopted. Before adoption 
the report was discussed by Prof. A. C. Warlick, A. P. Sorrels, J. 
W. Crow, and J. A. McKaughan. 

Bro. W. F. Flack, Secretary and Treasurer of the Board of 
Trustees of Round Hill School, read his financial report, and on 
motion it was adopted. 

By request of Bro. W. F. Flack it was moved and carried 
that an Auditing Committee be appointed to audit the accounts 
of Round Hill School. The Moderator appointed the following 
Brethren, Gordon Scoggins, W. R. Hill, and H. P. Rucker. 

The amended charter of Round Hill School was presented to 
the Association in regular session by M. L. Edwards, chairman of 
the Board of Trustees, which provides for the election of a Board 
of Trustees annually by the Green River Association and such 
other Associations as may adopt Round Hill School, which shall 
consist of not less than nine, nor more than fifteen members. 
Nine of whom shall be elected by the Green River Association, 
and the remainder by such Associations as may adopt said school, 
and which also provides for associate trustees, one to be recom- 
mended by each church of the Green River Association and they, 
together with the Board of Trustees, shall be elected by the 
Gren River Association at its annual meeting. Associate trustees 
of other Associations adopting said school to be elected by such 
Associations in such manner as they may deem advisable, same to 



GREEN RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 9 

be reported to the regular Board of Trustees. 

On motion Dr. A. E. Brown, Secretary of Mountain Schools, 
I was elected associate and honorary trustee of Round Hill School. 
The Association, on motion of Bro. A. P. Sorrels, unanimous- 
ly instructed the Board of Trustees to proceed with the work of 
building a dormitory for the school. 

By motion, Bro. R. E. Price was appointed to prepare obitu- 
aries of the members who had died the past year for publication 
in the Minutes. 

On motion a resolution was adopted making the 3^d Sunday in 
September the close of the financial year of the Association, and 
directing the Church Clerks to send church letters immediately 
thereafter to the Association Clerk. (See resolution.) 

The Association passed a resolution of thanks to Camp Creek 
church by a unanimous rising vote. (See resolution.) 

By motion the body adjourned to meet at 2 p. m. Prayer 
by Bro. A. P. Sorrels. 

SATURDAY AFTERNOON 
The Association met according to adjournment, and was op- 
ened by singing and prayer. 

REPORT ON CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 
The report on Christian Education was read by Bro. W. R. 
Hill, and also discussed by him, and on motion was adopted. 

The report on Woman's Work was ordered printed in the 
Minutes. 

REPORT ON B. Y. P. U. WORK 
The report on B. Y. P. U. Work was read and discussed by 
Bro. R. E. Price, and on motion adopted. (See report.) 

The Moderator appointed Rev. E. J. Jones delegate to the 
Southern Baptist Convention, and Rev. A. P. Sorrels delegate to 
the State Baptist Convention. 

After singing "God be With You Till We Meet Again," the 
Association adjourned to meet on Thursday before the first Sun- 
day in October 1920 with Old Fort Baptist Church. 

M. L. EDWARDS, Moderator 
J. A. McKAUGHAN, Clerk 
REPORT ON ORPHANAGE 
The Orphanage rests heavily on the hearts of our people. 
More than 525 boys and girls are growing into honorable manhood 
and womanhood under its benign influence. Its record is rich in 
helpful service; our people are satisfied. 

We feel more keenly with each passing year our obligations 
to the children who cry to us for help and friendship. And as 
this obligation is more clearly seen and felt, we the more gladly 
and generously discharge it. 



10 GREEN RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

And this is well, for the enormous and outragous prices that 
we are obliged to pay for every household necessity makes it nec- 
essary to increase the current fund in order to keep our beloved 
institution out of the bondage and peril of debt. 

Furthermore the pressure for admittance of boys and girls 
on the outside grows stronger day by day. Hundrews of home- 
less children utterly helpless and dependent clamor at the doors. 
The Lord has poured material things upon us. Our barns are 
filled with plenty and our presses burst out with new wine. We 
are well able to heed the cry of these children, and we must heed 
it or suffer it ourselves. 

To give relief to this army of needy children we must largely 
increase our current fund. What comes into the treasury barely 
covers the cost of supporting those within the walls of the Or^ h- 
anage. 

We have many children here who might be cared for by their 
mothers if a little help were supplied to them by the commur.ities 
from which they come. The welfare workers of the State, wilh. 
Mr. Roland F. Beasley at their head, are trying to hold these 
households intact. We would give our hearty endorsment to this, 
agency of help and blessing and then make more room in the Or- 
phanage for those who have neither mother and father but are 
wholly dependent upon the institution for this care and training,. 

Your committee would recommend: 

(1) The plan of setting apart ONE DAY FOR THE OR- 
PHANAGE at or near Thanksgiving by every man, woman and 
child in this Association. 

(2) A monthly contribution from every Sunday School in 
the Association. 

(3 A club of Charity and Children in the well organized 
Sunday School with an individual copy to as many others as pos- 
sible. R. G. SHORT. 
REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS 

More and more as we give the matter consideration, we are 
compelled to recognize the importance of the Sunday School in 
Kingdom Work. Show me a growing and wide-awake church and 
almost without exception you will find a live Sunday School full 
of energy and enthusiasm for the Master. Your attention is call- 
ed to the following figures taken from last year's Minutes. 
Members received in all churches by baptism 217, of this number 
121 came from the Sunday Schools. There are ten Sunday 
Schools in this Association which are open 6, 8 and 9 months in 
the year. From these Sunday Schools 21 were baptised. There 
are 16 schools that are open 12 months in the year, and from 
these 100 were baptised. 

The 6, 8 and 9 month Sunday Schools did not contribute one 



GREEN RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 11 



cent to the Orphanage, while the 12 month, or evergreen Sunday 
School gave $239.01. 

The most startling fact we find in going over the Minutes 
is this, the total membership of all the churches is 5583 
Out of this number 1019 attending Sunday school, leaving a total 
of 4564 who do not attend. We should be greatly concerned 
over this, and a movement should be started in every church to 
establish a practicable and living contact between the Sunday 
school and every church member. To accomplish this there must 
be in every church more and better equipment, consecrated Chris- 
tian teachers, and live and wide awake superintendents, who be- 
live that efficiency in God's service is just as important as effi- 
ciency on the farm, in the bank, or store, and factory. 

J. LLOYD TAYLOR 
REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS 

Any just appreciation of the Foreign Mission Board's work 
and responsibilities, and any effort to provide adequate resources 
for this work must be based upon a knowledge and just consider- 
ation of the extensive fields which the board is cultivating, the 
conditions on these fields, the variety of work that is being con- 
ducted, and the necssities of the work which we have allowed to 
accumulate through the years. 

The Foreign Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Conven- 
tion is charged with propagating the gospel in Japan, China, Af- 
rica, Italy, Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, Chile, etc. Such numer- 
ous and extensive mission fields put this work out of comparison 
with anything else we are doing. 

On these fields there are vaster numbers of human beings 
than the human mind can grasp. The population in these lands 
mounts into the hundreds of millions — some of them white, some 
black, some yellow, but all of them the object of God's love. 

The condition of these millions as compared with the people 
whom we know adds emphasis to the appeal of the great field afid 
the great numbers. These multitudes, whether in pagan or papal 
lands, are handicapped by ignorance and superstition, by physical 
suffering, and above all by aggravated sin for which they have 
found no remedy. If there is any pity in the Christian heart, it 
ought to be provoked by the deplorable conditions under which 
millions of our fellow beings on these mission fields are spending 
their lives while we enjoy the blessings of the gospel and a Chris- 
tian civilization which it has produced. 

But we shall not properly appraise Foreign Missions if we 
overlook the fact that it includes the evangelization of the lost, 
the education of the ignorant, the training of the saved, the heal- 
ing of the sick, the housing of feeble mission churches. Indeed, 
all that we are doing at home through state mission boards, home 



12 GREEN RiVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



mission boards, education boards, orphanages, sanitaria and the 
rest we are doing through the Foreign Mission Board. No ade- 
qute provision can be made for a work so extensive, so varied and 
comprehensive if we put Foreign Missions on a parity with any 
single Christian enterprise which we are conducting at home. 

There is another fact, and a great fact it is, which must be 
taken into consideration if we are to meet our obligations to this, 
great work at this time. The war immeasurably enlarged our in- 
ternational Christian duty. The heroic efforts and sacrifices 
which we made to set the world free from the extraordinary re- 
straints of autocracy creates for us a new and larger duty to pro- 
mote everywhere the internal constraints of the gospel of Christ. 
The unrestrained freedom of unregenerated human nature in- 
evitably menaces the world. The extraordinary world situation 
which we have created with our guns lays upon us the most serious, 
responsibility to send the gospel into all nations. 

The Convention at Atlanta in May recognized the new obli- 
gations which this extraordinary world situation laid upon Sou- 
thern Baptists and authorized the Board to undertake reconstruc- 
tion work in Europe, to hasten with the gospel into disturbed and 
endangered Russia, and to set up the banner of Christ in Persia,, 
Syria and in Galilee, from whence the blessings of Christ's life 
and death have flowed down through centuries to us, and to which, 
we are under peculiar obligations. In the new work thus desig- 
nated for the Foreign Mission Board its task and its needs have 
been well-nigh doubled. Let churches and individual givers lay 
to heart these facts in making future contributions to this work. 

It is fitting to say that as poorly as we have supported this, 
great world enterprise, the blessings of heaven have been upon it. 
Some of the results of the work last year were 5,635 converts, 
baptized, 41 churches organized, two churches assuming self-sup- 
port, 61,588 patients treated, and 129,298 treatments adminis- 
tered. 

The world fields are ripe unto the harvest, but much of the 
bending grain will be lost if we do not quickly thrust in the sickle.. 
The world has never seen the universal human mind so expectant,^ 
so ready to make great decisions, and therfore such need for 
quick and decisive action by those who would turn that mind to, 
the right things and lead the world by the highway of the crosa 
back to God. Foreign Missions was never so imperious as just 
now. 

The Foreign Mission Board furnishes for free distribution 
the best tracts and can fill orders for the best books on Foreign 
Missions. We would, therefore, recommend to our people that 
they cultivate an acquaintance with the Literature Department of 



GREEN RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 13 

the Board and seek to promote among our church membership a 
better knowledge of the work. 

While the 75 Million Campaign will be presented to the body- 
in another report your committee on Foreign Missions would add 
its endorsement of this movement and its admonition to the 
churches of the Association that there be no failure to give this 
Campaign the most unqualified, faithful and enthusiastic support. 
The success of the Campaign will help everything that we are do- 
ing and its failure would hurt everything. We have set for our- 
selves a task worthy of a great people and shall prove ourselves 
worthy of our inheritance if we accomplish it. The eyes of our 
Lord and of the world are upon us and we must succeed in this 
great thing to which we have laid our hands. 

Read by 

J. T. BOWDEN. 
REPORT ON HOME MISSIONS 

Dr. B. D. Gray, Corresponding Secretary of our Home Mis- 
sion Board, makes a request of your committee with which we are 
glad to comply in opening this report. It is that we shall call at- 
tention that the Board unreservedly throws its wjiole heart and its 
every worker into the purposes of the $75,000,000 Campaign. 

This Campaign is the biggest uplift effort ever made by 
Southern Baptists. It is the first time we have set ourselves 
as a whole to do our very best by our gifts for every object by 
which Baptists seek to honor and serve our Lord Jesus Christ. 
The very heart-blood of Home Missions is co-operation, and this 
great co-operative effort should teach us better than we have ever 
known how to work togethr to help every cause Baptists support. 

Your Committee would set forth with all possible brevity 
some issues that now hang on our support to Home Missions. 
They are questions of tremendous import. 

It was the Christian faith of American people that enabled 
us to do such great things in the world war. Over and over, al- 
most every agency of the government appealed to the preachers 
and churches for help. Though the convictions of many of these 
were ruthlessly ignored by unwarranted government interference 
in religion, not once did the churches and preachers fail the nation 
in its hour of need. 

The forces which took advantage of the stress of war to 
threaten the dear-bought principle of religious liberty, are yet ac- 
tive and alert. The government itself has never signified any 
change of heart since it allowed the privilege of denominational 
service to Catholics and Jews, in the army camps at home and in 
France, while it unfairly cut the great evangelical bodies of 



14 GREEN RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



America off from this same opportunity. Through several so- 
called inter-denominational organizations, through the so-called 
Liberty Church at government construction plants, through the 
sustained Union Movement propaganda, and in other ways, stror.g 
influences are still at work to subvert and discredit that religious 
liberty for which Baptists have always fought, and which Baptists, 
led in writing into the Constitution of the nation. 

A great program of denomination Home Missions is the 
mightiest organized force Baptists can possibly support to help 
keep religion free in America, and the present un-American acti- 
vities against this Constitutional guarantee are a trumpet call to 
us to enlarge our Home Mission support. 

There is now an attack on the very heart of Christianity,. 
which is more cunning and dangerous than any similar former at- 
tack. Ingersoll assailed Christianity frankly from without. Pro- 
German theologians, less honest than the American agnostic, at- 
tack our faith from the protected vantage of professors' chairs, 
where learning is taught our youth in great American universi- 
ties, and even in some colleges and theological seminarie«. 

We hav6 conquered German armies, but German Theology 
that would take Christ from us, is not yet scourged from the 
class rooms where many American boys and girls are taught. It 
has even insinuated its way into some pulpits. 

In our own strength we are unable to cope with these giants 
of man's learing and with the world's seeming wish to get away 
from God, but God who is with us is stronger than our enemies, if 
we shall do our best. The New Theology, which never yet saved 
a single soul, is a challenge to Baptists to a great Home Mission 
program, which will send a preacher of the gospel of redemption 
into every community in the land. 

While these cunning wiles of the Evil One challenge God's, 
people to clear thinking, importunate praying and great Home 
Mission giving, we are still confronted by startling needs and 
blessed opportunities in the a b c field of evangelism. In the 
South are 20,000,000 souls, our own people, who have made no- 
profession of religion. Through Home Missions these invite our 
denomination, which has led America in evangelism, to a far 
larger support of its Home Mission Board, which has by far, and 
all the while, led all American Home Mission Boards in soul-win- 
ning. These men and women will have more influence on the 
world's faith and destiny than any equal numbers anywhere in 
the world. 

While new world-opportunities press upon us in other lands, 
and the cry for workers for the foreign front grows ever more 
insistent, Southern Baptists have in the secondary mission schools. 



GREEN RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 15 

of the Home Mission Board a seed-bed unsurpassed in America 
for producing young men and women who devote their lives to the 
ministry and mission. Thus our strength of impact at the ends 
of the earth is definitely linked with and dependent on the amount 
of support we give to the ''base of supplies," to the "training 
camps" at home for service over-seas. 

We have in the enlistment work of the Home Board the be- 
ginning of one of the greatest activities Southern Baptists ever 
undertook for the releasing of the energies of hundreds of 
thousands of people who perish for lack of knowledge. We have 
neglected this work for generations. It is vain and it belittles 
its worth to think we can correct this long neglect by hasty cam- 
paigns. It will require patient thought ad unflagging effort. 

We plead for a new awakening to the great issues now at 
stake in Home Missions, and for a greater and sacrificial support 
to this cause. Every consideration of Christian patriotism and 
of love for our Master and our own people invites us. 

Each of our churches should order the admirable free tracts 
of the Home Mission Board, addressing Baptist Home Mission 
Board, Atlanta, Georgia. A larger use should be made of the 
Board's admirable mission study books. These books deal with 
timely and crucial problems. Every pastor who has not read them 
should do so. They are sixty cents each postpaid. 
Respectfully submitted, 

J. A. McKAUGHAN. 
STATE MISSIONS 

Tabulation of last year's work: 

Churches served 261 

Conversions 1627 

Sunday School enrollment - 14159 

Number of missionaries 159 

B aptisms , 1004 

Houses of worship building 41 

The Board of Missions has seven departments at work. 
1 st — Evangelism 

This will always be our first work. It is sad to know that 
the number of baptisms dropped last year. Why the decrease in 
conversions? Is it a cooling off of our evangelistic fever; or is it 
due to the partial evangelization we have been doing in the past; 
or has more of the churches become self-supporting? We should 
press the evangelistic work to the greatest of our ability. 
2d — Church Building 

Our Board of Missions is helping, in a limited way, weak 
mission churches erect houses of worship. About $9000 has 
been spent in the last year this way. 



16 GREEN RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

3d — Colportage 

This department of our work was started this year. It is 
the aim of the board to employ men who will work in the cap- 
acity of missionary and colporteur. For the work of missionary a 
salary is paid. For the work of colporteur a commission is al- 
lowed, and all colporteurs are bonded. First they are to sell 
good books, eitlier direct or by mail order. Second, they are to 
distribute free, good tracts and wholesome literature. Third, 
they are required to enlarge the circulation of the Biblical Re- 
corder. ' 

Mormans, Christian Scientists, and Russellites should be sur- 
passed by Missionary Baptists in doing colportage work. 
4th— Mobile Schools 

We must not depend on large mass meetings and strong men 
to do all the Master's work. Like the Master, we must do a great 
amount of intensive teaching in small groups. We urge all the 
pastors, teachers, and other church workers to attend the mobile 
schools, either as teacher or student. 

5th — Woman's Work 

This work in an organized form was begun thirty years ago. 
We have 1557 Woman's Missionary Societies. The work is or- 
ganized in 52 Associations. See the report of the W. M. U. of 
the Green River Association. 

6th— B. Y. P. U. 

Time of testing. What shall the young people be? What 
shall they do? Whom shall they serve? We insist that the pas- 
tors organize the young people of each church and community 
into a B. Y. P. U. and provide training and work for them. 
7th — Sunday Schools 

This seems to be the most resourceful department of our 
State Mission work. We note with emphasis the importance and 
need of teacher traininng, and rural institute work. See the re- 
port of the committee on Sunday Schools in the Green River As- 
sociation. 

Respectfully 

A. P. SORRELS. 
MINISTERIAL RELIEF 

In the eleventh chapter of the letter to the Hebrews, we 
have a list of the heroes of faith. These men still live because 
they stood for principle. 

Our patriotic blood is also stirred as we study the lives of 
the martyrs of the cross, and the champions of Protestantism, 
liberty of thought and an open Bible. Also we are proud of our 
national heroes, both dead and living. In 1916 when the nation 
called for our boys, the Red Cross, and Y. M. C. A. appealed to 



GREEN RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 17 



the church and the nation for aid. Both responded nobly. 

But away down in Africa, over in China, Japan, India, Buma, 
the islands of the sea, also in the American frontiers and in the 
destitute places of our own country, the modern heroes of the 
cross are rendering a noble service for the kingdom of God. The 
world is unconscious of their patriotism. While the world is 
rocked in the cradle of indifference, these young heroes are 
quietly giving their lives to make democracy safe for the world. 
Slowly, but gradually they are exhausting their strength for the 
good of humanity and for the civilization of the world. 

Many corporations provide a fund for the protection of their 
retiring employees. Also the Government provides for our aged 
National heroes. 

Shall the capitalists and the government excel the church in 
appreciation of heroic deeds and patriotic service? The Presby- 
terians, the Methodists, the Episcopalians say 'no,* The Baptists 
say 'no.' The Baptists do not wish to be accounted 'slackers" in 
regwardinag their noble men. 

The Baptists of this State organized the Board for Minis- 
terial Relief nearly thirty years ago. Over one hundred needy 
ministers have been aided by this board. We cannot give the ex- 
act number of beneficiaries at the present time, but somewhere 
about fifty. 

Contributions to this cause are gradually increasing. In 
1917 the Green River Association gave $57.37 to this board; last 
year $106.30. In 1917 the State paid $6240.49; last year 
$6438.18; this year up to September 24th, $5639.39 have 
been reported. 

Back of Christianity, morality, education and civilization 
stands the church. Back of the church stands the preacher who 
bears the heaviest burdens and faithfully serves the church on 
the same salary paid ten years ago. Having spent the bloom of 
manhood in preparation for this great work, having exhausted 
their strength in a noble cause, the church can use them no more. 
The public can no longer derive any renumeration from their 
service. With many regrets they must fold their banners and 
give up a work which for half a century or more, has been the 
daily burden of their hearts. Shall they not be rewarded for 
their well spent, useful lives? 

This appeal is not an appeal for sympathy, not an act of 
charity, but a principle of justice. 

Dr. E. T. Tomblinson, secretary of the Ministers and Mis- 
sionaries Benefit Board of the Northern Baptist Convention says, 
"Only one minister in twenty-one has had an increase in salary 
in the last two years." I am persuaded that the same is true in 



18 



GREEN RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



the Soutn. Day laborers and skilled workmen have received 
wages that would have been unbelievable two years ago. Yet 
twenty out of twenty-one of our ministers must face conditions, 
that are twice as hard to bear and difficulties twice as perplexing: 
as they were before the outbreak of the war; yet on the same 
meager salary of former years. 

There is a principle here that goes deeper than sympathy 
or charity. It is the principle of right and justice. 
Respectfully submitted^ 

J. M. BROWN. 
THE GREEN RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION, SESSION 1919 

The undersigned respectfully reports to the association as. 
Chairman of the Board of Trustees of Round Hill School and as. 
manager of the Million Dollar Campaign in the Green River As- 
sociation the following collections of cash, stamps and bonds, and 
the following notes, towit: 



Church 
Bill's Creek _ 
Cane Creek __ 
Cooper's Gap 
W. Valley __ 
Piney Knob _ 

Pea Ridge 

Piedmont 

Nebo 

Mill Springs _ 

Columbus 

Green Hill __ 

Glenwood 

Mt. Vernon __ 

Macedonia 

Rutherfordton 
Clear Creek _ 
Montf'ds Cove 

E. Marion 

Clinchfield __ 

P. Grove 

Rock Springs 
Mt. Creek ___ 
Round Hill __ 



Cash I Stamps 



26 35 

1 00 

1 00 
6 00 

2 00 



23 50 



45 00 
2 00 



52 00 



35 00 
1 25 
45 00 
10 00 
10 00 



59 00 



510 00 



$ 5 00 



5 00 
5 00 



85 00 
26 00 



5 001 
20 00 



Bonds 



44 00 



451 00 



65 00 
135 00 
295 00 



100 00 



350 00 



50 00 
100 00 



Notes 
5 90 00 
22 00 

34 00 

79 00 
58 00 
15 00 
45 00 

201 00 
110 00 

35 00 

80 00 
95 00 

235 00 

20 00 

1241 00 

173 25 

121 00 

110 00 

110 001 

98 OOJ 

145 OOJ 

490 00| 

2693 251 



Total 

$ 121 35 

23 00 

35 00 

90 00 

65 00 

15 00 

153 5a 

227 00 

155 00 

42 00 

100 00 

95 00- 

431 00 

20 00 

2077 00 

174 50 

166 00 

120 00 

120 00 

98 00 

269 00 

675 00 

3598 25 



Total $ 829 10 $1141 001$ 600 00 $6300 50|$8870 60 

Miscellaneous collections $64.00 

Less amt. paid G. T. Carswell for serv. in campaign 64.00 



Total 



Respectfully submitted, 

J. A. McKAUGHAN 
M. L. EDWARDS 
REPORT ON ROUND HILL SCHOOL 



OG 



GREEN RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 19 



Round Hill School was founded by the Round Hill Baptist 
church in 1899 and donated to the Green River Association on 
October 6th, 1900. The property was deeded by the Round Hill 
church to the Association by fee simple warranty deed on May 
7th, 1913. It is also one of the Mission Schools of the Home 
Board of the Southern Baptist Convention. The school grew 
from a single wooden structure to a brick building and two dor- 
mitories. One of these dormitories was destroyed by fire in 
October 1916. The two buildings, the land and furnishings are 
worth about $22000. It has not been free from, debt since 1908 
when the brick building was erected. The debt was all subscribed 
for at one time, but for some reason the notes were never all 
paid and an increasing debt has been growing on the school until 
it had reached more than five thousand dollars. Some of that 
has been lifted since the launching of the Million Dollar Cam- 
paign. The trustees have paid out for buildings including the 
dormitory that was burned, pianos, seats, desks and other fur- 
nishings and fixtures and including interest on indebtedness and 
insurance on buildings between $22,000 and $25,000. The 
Home Mission Board has donated $3500 for buildings and equip- 
ment and $700 each year to help meet running expenses. $1200 
received as insurance on the dormitory that was burned was ap- 
plied on the indebtedness. The association and friends of the 
school have paid $11755. 

In spite of the misfortunes of the school and the burden of 
the debt the school has graduated 92 young men and women, more 
than two thousand five hundred have received instruction. Many 
have gone from the school into their and other churches as lead- 
ers in the betterment of humanity and in God's service. 

The cost per student is within reach of all who want to go to 
school. The board for last month was nine dollars and twenty- 
four cents. One hundred and twenty-five dollars is sufficient to 
pay all expenses for a year. 

The needs of the school are many and pressing. The prin- 
cipal ones are: To free the school from debt. To erect a new 
dormitory and equip with some modern necessities and to better 
equip what we already have. 

Year before last we enrolled 98 students for the year, last 
year 118, at present 90. Year before last the boarding depart- 
ment enrolled 27, last year 48 and at present 72. 

STATISTICAL REPORT ON ROUND HILL ACADEMY 

Number of teachers employed, 5. 
Number of students enrolled, 118. 
Graduating students, 9. 



20 GREEN RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

Total number of graduates to date, 92. 

To teachers salaries paid $2,963.00 

To house rents paid 100.00 

To bursar for collection 30.00 

To canvassing 32.88 

To improvements and equipments 50.94 • 

Wood by Prof. Warlick 16.25 

By W. F. Flack, Secretary 73.56 

To coal and hauling Nanney & Morris 119.07 

Hendricks Harrelson Co., chairs 37.10 

Scoggin Furniture Co. 94.00 

To Nanney & Morris for stoves 110.97 

Carpneter Taylor Co. 86.35 

Incidental expenses 100.47 

Total $3,814.59 

By tuition collected $2,577.16 

Home Mission Board 700.00 

Cash on hand 26.75 

Gifts 10.00 

Piping and adds 3.00. 

Pleasant Grove Church 25.25 

Commencement Exercise 73.10 

By Mr. R. Silvers 2.00 

By amount fund account outstanding 397.33 

Total $3,814.59 

TREASURER'S REPORT 

State Missions $ 70.70 

Home Missions 82.10 

Foreign Missions 71.18. 

Ministerial Relief 12.20 

Orphanage 33.10- 

Minute fund 101.01 

W. A. HARRILL, Treasurer 
REPORT ON CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

Your committee is glad to report that along with other ob- 
jects of the Association, the interest in Christian education is 
growing. The great war has shown the people like nothing else 
could have that a man when he is old does not depart from the 
training that he has received when a child. He has also shown 
that mental training on a large scale is even dangerous when it 
does not rest on a substantial moral training. And, too, they 
have come to realize that no moral training can be substantial 
that does not have as a bed rock deep religious convictions. 



GREEN RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 21 

People are coming more and more to realize this and are looking 
to our Christian colleges and high schools to give their children 
the right moral and religious attitude towards life. 

Unless all signs fail the Baptists of the South are entering 
a day of service for the world and for Christ the like of which 
has, rarely, if ever been vouched safe to any people. This new 
day is going to demand equipped leadership. The great leader- 
ship that the Baptists of the South possess today is attributable 
almost wholly to the denominational high schools and colleges 
maintained by the Southern Baptist for the past half century. Al- 
though these schools were poorly financed and handicapped by 
lack of sufficient support. They served the cause wonderfully 
well and have merited the favor unto which they are at last com- 
ing, but into this new day unto which the Baptist with the whole 
world are entering there is a need of not only trained leadership, 
but of trained laymen. There is no place for training our lay- 
man like our denominational schools. Hence the need of better 
support of these schools. There are seventeen Baptist Denomina- 
tional schools and colleges in North Carolina, thirteen of these are 
Associational high schools divided among the sixty-five Associa- 
tions of the State Convention. The Baptists of the State contri- 
buted last year Twenty-five Thousand, Five Hundred Dollars and 
twenty-eight cents to the maintenance of these schools, an aver- 
age of 8.8 cents per member, which certainly seems small enough. 
But our own Green River Association with. one of those schools 
located in it, with forty-seven churches and 5,585 members con- 
tributed to Christian education $232.41, an average of 4 1-6 cents 
per member, not one-half the State average. 

It is also interested to note that only ten of the forty-seven 
churches of this Association contributed anything to this worthy 
cause. 

Against this $242.41, the Home Board contributed to our 
Round Schools $700.00. 

It does seem that our own Association should contribute dol- 
lar for dollar for out-side support. This will be surpassed in our 
Seventy-five Million Dollar Campaign, but steps should be taken 
to insure its continuance after the five years is completed. 

This can be easily done when we have succeeded in getting 
the finances of all our churches on a budget basis. 
Respectfully submitted, 

W. R. HILL 
B. Y. P. U. REPORT 

The most important task or duty of the Baptist churches of 
the South today is the proper training and attention to its young 
people. They are the hope of tomorrow. The kind of boys and 



22 GREEN RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



girls that we have in our homes and churches today will be the. 
kind of men and women that we have tomorrow. 

The Baptist Young People's Union seeks to develop the men- 
tal, social and spiritual side of life, or the three great natures of 
man. The mental training is secured in the training and study 
of our unions. The social side is stressed with socials every few 
months. Man is by nature a social creature. He must have 
friends, home, associates, companions, etc. The B. Y. P. U. 
stresses this and encourages good wholesome social life. It is 
much better that our boys and girls be in a good church social 
than in some cross roads store, livery stable or garage telling 
smutty jokes and having evil thoughts and talk. The moral side 
is the main thing and should be stressed more. However, all our 
church work of every description seeks to save lost souls and helps, 
men and women to live a better life. If any religion or creed 
fails in this it has lost its main purpose. 

As far as we know, there are only six Baptist Young People's. 
Unions in our 47 churches of the Association. They are: Ma- 
rion, first church; Columbus, Mt. Vernon, Round Hill, Ruth- 
erfordton and Bethel. Why not a county church have a B. Y. P. 
U. ? Can't they? Is there any reason why they cannot? It will 
help to fill one of their greatest neds, namely, trained leaders. 
Where doe we get our Sunday school teachers, superintendents, 
and other leaders? Most of them come from our B. Y. P. U. 

The main reason why any Baptist church should have a B. Y. 
P. U. is that it gives the young people a chance to do something. 
They are full of life and energy and need some wholesome way ta 
exert' that energy. Every member of a Union has a chance to 
speak or read at least once a month. This gives them the train- 
ing which they so badly ned. If this energy is not let go in a 
good wholesome way it may go in some other way. It is the pur- 
pose and plan of the B. Y. P. U. to direct this energy in the right, 
way and bring honor and glory to God's Kingdom. 

1 — The B. Y. P. U. is not a prayer meeting. It has captaina 
and its meetings are based upon the B. Y. P. U. Quarterly. 

2 — It is not a teaching service like the Sunday School. The 
Sunday School seeks to enlist everybody. The B. Y. P. U. seeks, 
young converts. 

3 — It is not an evangelistic service. It is a training class. 

4 — The B. Y. P. U. is not a lecture course. It believes in 
training by practice. 

We respectfully urge that every church of this Association 
that does not have a Baptist Young People's Union to organize 
same at once. We urge the pastor and delegates here to care- 
fully consider this matter and go back home and try to organize 



GREEN RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 23 

a Union. Write Rev. J. D. Moore, Raleigh, N. C, for full infor- 
mation and literature. Why wait? Why put it off any longer? 
It is simple. It is good. It will give your young people an active 
part in your church work. It will keep them busy. It will make 
better and stronger Christians out of them. 

Next year we hope that we will have forty-five Unions instead 
of six. 

Brethren, now is the time to work if there ever was a time. 

Respectfully submitted, 

R. E. PRICE, Chairman 
REPORT OF WOMAN'S MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

The Woman's Missionary Society is a "helper" in our church 
work. We have 1,560 societies in North Carolina. 

Christ's last command on earth was, "Go ye into all the 
world and preach the gospel to every creature," and uniting our 
efforts, they count for more in this g.eat work. We pray unitedly 
for the spread of God's Kingdom. There are special weeks of 
prayer, when we pray for each different field of mission work. 
We know about the fields because we study them. We study our 
Bibls. Then we cannot keep the good news of the kingdom, so 
we tell others. God has given to each of His the privilege of giv- 
ing the message of His great love to a thirsty world. We should 
feel more deeply the responsibility and know if we do our part, 
the work will suffer and some one will die without Christ as a 
personal Saviour. 

Systematic giving is an advantage to us, giving each month 
as much as we can. We learn that small offerings each month 
amount to great sums for God. In this manner we are saving al- 
w. ys for Christ. A helpful and sweet experience is the meeting 
tcge:her in loving Christian fellowship. This means much to the 
busy home maker, the business woman, and the woman of leisure. 
We meet together to speak, to pray, to sing, to plan, to learn, to 
give to God and His work. 

We make definite plans for personal service. There are the 
poor, the erring, the ignorant, the indifferent, and some who are 
neglected in our community. By co-operation we may help these 
unfortunate ones. Christ says our remembrance and good deeds 
for these is doing so much for Him. 

The greatest of any blessing — God is in our midst in our 
meeting. He hears our prayers and answers them. We exper- 
ience direct answers to prayer. The dearest place on earth is 
where God talks to us and we talk to Him. One is never too busy 
to give some time to God's work. We need to turn aside from 
our work and think of God, who is our strength. 

Many of our women are tithers. Let us not only be tithers 



24 GREEN RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



of money, but of our talents, our time, and give ourselves to 
God's work. 

Our aim this year is a society in every church, to enlist every 
woman and girl for prayer, for study, and to learn to be stew- 
ards of the Master. Through prayer, faith, and work, we are 
going to accomplish our part of the 75 Million Campaign. 

CLARA MORRIS, Supt. W. M. U. 
REPORT OF WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

The sixth annual meeting of the W. M. U. of the Green River 
Association met with Old Fort church Sept. 20th and 21st, 1919. 

Devotional services was conducted by Mrs. B. L. Ashworth. 

A cordial welcome was extended the Union by Rev Mr. 
Church, pastor at Old Fort. 

Miss Estelle Logan responded to address of welcome. 

Roll call of societies, showing number of societies present. 

Talk on "A Larger Enlistment," by Mrs. John Wells. 

"Mission Study and Mission Literature," by Mrs. B. Y. Alli- 
son. 

Two very interesting talks on Christian Education, by Miss 
Bertha Carroll and Miss Clara Morris. 

Paper on "Stewardship," by Miss Ola Lovelace. 

Instructive talks on "Tithing," by Miss Carroll, Rev. Mr. 
Church, Mrs. Allison and others. 

Miss Clara Morris, our efficient superintendent spoke on things 
of the training school at Shelby, giving methods of organization 
for churches to work in 75 Million Campaign. 

Evening service. Devotional service by superintendent. 

Talk, "Training for Service," by Mrs. A. L. Grayson. 

Address by Miss Bertha Carroll, State Secretary, was en- 
joyed by all, as she made very plain and clear "The Union's Plans 
for the Coming Year." 

Sunday morning. Devotional service by Mr. Tyler, of Mar- 
ion. 

We were fortunate in having Dr. W. W. Cullom, State Or- 
ganizer, for 75 Million Campaign with us at the morning service. 
His talk in making a worthy response to God in the coming cam- 
paign was an inspiration to all and made us feel indeed like com- 
ing close to God and his power working in us, we shall be invin- 
cible. 

Our women seemed enthused over the 75 Million Campaign 
and all phases of our work. 

The officers were re-elected for the coming year and we hope 
to move forward in our work. 

Adjourned to meet with Round Hill church, Saturday before 



GREEN RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 25 

1st Sunday in September, 1920. 

MISS CLARA MORRIS, Supt. 
MRS. J. L. TAYLOR, Sec. 
RESOLUTION 

We your committee appointed by the Association to submit 
resolutions with reference to the forming of compact fields do 
hereby submit the following: 

Resolved by this Association; 1st. That its Executive Com- 
mittee be requested to call a meeting at an early date to consider 
the matter of forming compact pastoral fields. 

2d. That each pastor and two members elected by each 
church be invited to attend, such meeting, and that the time and 
place be named by said Executive Committee. 

Signed, 
A. P. SORRELS, 
J. T. BOWDEN, 
J. H. SMITH 

On motion the resolution was unanimously adopted. 

The new pastors, J. T. Bowden, E. J. Jones, J. M. Brown, E. 
W. Church, and S. W. Shuford, were introduced to the Associa- 
tion by J. A. McKaughan. 

The following were appointed as Committee to nominate the 
Executive Committee : R. G. Short, J. M. Brown, and J. B. Flyn. 

On motion the body then adjourned with prayer to meet at 
2 p. m. 

RESOLUTION 

Whereas the Clerk of the Association must have time enough 
for tabulating the delegates to the Association from the churches, 
and the statistics for the Minutes before the meeting of the As- 
sociation, and whereas it would be a matter of helpful informa- 
tion to the Association to have reports from the churches tabu- 
lated for display at the session of the Association, therefore be it 
resolved: 

1st. That the financial year of the Association close on the 
3d Sunday in September. 

2d. That the church clerks be requested and notified to fill 
out and forward the church letter of their church to the Clerk of 
the Association by and not later than September 22d. 

3d. That any church letter that does not reach the clerk 
of the Association shall not be tabulated in the report to the As- 
sociation. 

(RESOLUTION 
Whereas, the Camp Creek church has entertained the Green 
River Association so well, and its members have thrown wide the 
doors of their homes with such cordial hospitality to both the de- 



26 GREEN RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

legates and visiting brethren therefore be it resolved: 

That v^^e extend to the Camp Creek Baptist church our hearty 
thanks for its welcome, and to the members individually our most 
sincere appreciation for the hospitality they have extended us in 
their homes. 

H. P. RUCKER, 
E. H. LOGAN, 
W. H. HILL, 

Committee 
CONSTITUTION 

No. 1. This Association shall be known as the Green River 
Baptist Association, and shall be composed of Baptist churches; 
whose articles of Faith and Constitutions are in harmony with 
those of the Association. 

No. 2. The membership shall be composed of delegates el- 
ected by the Churches connected with this body, and all ordained 
ministers who are members of, or working as pastors in connection 
with said churches, and each church shall be allowed a represen- 
tation of two delegates for fifty members, and every church of 
over fifty members shall be allowed one additional delegate for 
every additional fifty members. 

No. 3. The primary object of the Association shall be to 
encourage and support Wake Forest College, to educate young 
men called of God to the Ministry and approved by the churches 
to which they belong; to encourage education among the people 
of the State ; to support the Gospel in the destitute portions of the 
State and of the Southern Baptist Convention, to send the Gospel 
to the nations that have it not; to encourage the distribution, and 
study of the Bible and a sound religious literature to assist Bap- 
tist churches in the erection of houses of worship, to encourage 
the proper care of indigent orphan children, and destitute and 
aged ministers of the Gospel, to encourage the organization and 
support of Baptist Sunday Schools, and to co-operate with the 
Baptist State Convention in all its departments of labor. 

No. 4. The Association shall meet annually on Thursday 
before the first Sabbath in October. 

5. The officers of the Association shall be a Moderator,. 
Vice-Moderator, Clerk and Treasurer, who shall be elected by the 
Association and continue in office until their successors are elected 

No. 6. The Moderator shall preside, or fill the chair, by*call- 
ing some member of the body thereto, and enforce order in ac- 
cordance with Mell's Parliamentary Practice. 

No. 7. The Clerk shall record the proceedings, conduct the 
correspondence, and publish and distribute the Minutes. 

No. 8. The Treasurer shall receive all funds contributed by 



GREEN RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 27 

the churches or individuals to the object of the Association, re- 
ceipting the contributors for the same; and forward all contribu- 
tions to their proper destination, and make a full report of all re- 
ceipts and disbursements to the Association at its annual session, 
and on retiring from his office turn over to his successor all mon- 
eys, papers and books belonging thereto. 

No. 9. There shall be appointed by the Association at each 
session a Board of Missions and Sunday Schools, consisting of one 
member from. each church belonging to the Association, and other 
brethren living in Rutherfordton or its immediate vicinity, five of 
whom shall constitute a quorum, which during the intervals be- 
tween the meetings of the Associations, shall have charge of the 
various interests and objects fostered by the Association, and 
shall encourage the churches to give libertlly thereto, and shall 
make a full report of its work including such suggestions relative 
thereto as it may think advisable to the Association at its annual 
sessions. 

No. 10. The President, or in case of his death or disquali- 
fication, any three members of the Board may call a meeting 
thereof. 

No. 11. This Constitution may be changed or amended at 
any annual session by two-thirds of the represenatives voting in 
the affirmative. 

ASSOCIATION COVENANT 

Article 1. We believe in one only and true God, and there 
are three persons in the Godhead — the Father, the Son, and Holy 
Ghost, and these are one in substance, and equal in power and 
glory. 

Article 2. We believe the Scriptures of Old and New Testa- 
mnts are the Word of God, and the only rule of faith and practice. 

Article 3. We believe in the doctrine of original sin. 

Article 4. We believe in man's impotency to recover himself 
from the fallen state he is in by his own free will and ability. 

Article 5. We believe that sinners are justified in the sight 
of God only through the imputed righteousness of Jesus Christ. 

Article 6. We believe the saints shall preserve in grace, and 
that they never shall finally fall away. 

Article 7. We believe that Baptism and the Lord's Supper 
are ordinances instituted by Christ and that true believers are the 
only proper subjects thereof. 

Article 8. Wie believe that immersion is the only Scriptural 
mode of Baptism. 

Article 9. We believe that no person has a right to admin- 
ister the ordinances but such as are regularly called and qualified 
thereto. 



28 GREEN RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

Article IQ. We believe in the resurrection of the dead, and 
a general judgment; that the punishment of the wicked shall be 
everlasting, and the joys of the righteous eternal. 

Article 11. We, the members of the Green River Baptist As- 
sociation, agreeing to the above Articles of Faith, do, for and in 
behalf of the churches which we represent, covenant and agree 
and give ourselves up to each other in church and Christian fel- 
fowship, in order to keep up the unity of the spirit in the bonds of 
peace, and to assist each other in all matters of distress and to 
pray for each other's prosperity. 

OBITUARIES 
Judge M. H. Justice 

Judge Michael Hoke Justice died February 12th, 1912, at 
his boarding house in Asheville from acute indigestion. He was. 
holding court in Aheville at the time of his death. He was born 
and reared in Rutherford county, being the son of the late Rev. 
and Mrs. Butler Justice. He was a member of the State Senate 
during the administration of Chas. B. Aycock. He served on the 
Superior court bench for many years, holding court in every 
county in the State. He was credited with having more friends, 
and relatives than any other man in judicial circles in Western 
North Carolina. His father was a Baptist minister. The judge 
was a devoted Christian and was always found doing his full 
Christian duty. 

He was 75 years old and was buried in the Cedar Grove ce- 
metery in Rutherfordton. Members of his family have won dis- 
tinction for themselves, especially Ed Justice. He leaves two 
sons. Dr. Gaston B. Justice of Marion and Michael, Jr., of Nor- 
folk, Va., and two daughters. Misses Louisa and Martha. 

Telegrams and letters of sympathy poured into the Justice 
home from all over the country. This showed the high esteem 
in which the late judge was held. 

JESSIE T. LEWIS 

Corporal Jessie T. Lewis is the son of Mr. and Mrs. J. M. 
Lewis, of Mill Springs, Polk county. He was killed in action 
September 29th, 1918 in France. He was a member of Co. G, 
120th Infantry, 30th Division. He was a faithful member of 
Mill Springs Baptist church and a devoted Christian. He gave 
his life for Liberty and Justice. 

HELEON YATES SORRELS 

Heleon Yates Sorrels is the son of Rev. and Mrs. A. P. Sor- 
rels of Union Mills. He was killed in action October 9th, 1918. 
He entered service January 29th, 1918. He saw about three 
months' active service in France. He belonged to the Navy 6 
years. While there he was awarded a medal with the following 



GREEN RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 29 

on it: "For Your Fidelity, Zeal and Obedience." Heleon was a 
faithful member of the church and was well known and admired 
by his many friends and comrades. He gave his life that Demo- 
cracy might live and Autocracy die. 

Fred Williams 

Private Fred Williams is the only son of Mr. and Mrs. R. S. 
Wiilliams of Rutherfordton. He died November 8th in France of 
influenza. He was a member of the famous Old Hickory Divis- 
ion and did his part nobly in the fight and then was struck down 
by disease. Fred was a young man of ambition, energy and lov- 
able qualities. He made friends everywhere he went and to know 
him was to love and admire him. He sleeps the "Long Sleep" in 
Flanders Field and fills a noble soldier's grave. Blessings on his 
memory. He was a member of Rutherfordton Baptist Church. 
Private Baxter Guffey 

Died of wounds received in action October 23d, 1918. M. 
G. Co. 6th Infanry, A. E. F. Private Baxter Guffey is the son of 
Mr. and Mrs. S. P. Guffey, of Union Mills, R-2. He was one of 
the first boys that went into service from this county, going to 
Camp Jackson, September 7th, 1917. He had many friends and 
to know him was to love and admire him. He was a good Chris- 
tian boy. Age 25 years, 6 months and 21 days. He went to 
France April 1st, 1918 and saw about 6 months' active service 
there. He gave his young life for the sacred cause of liberty and 
democracy. He was a devoted member of Camp Creek Baptist 
church. 

Yates Geer 

Private D. Yates Geer is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Geer, 
of near Gilkey. He entered the service October 4th, 1917 at 
Camp Jackson. He went overseas May 12th, 1918. He was in 
the big drive on the Hindenburg line in September 1918, and gave 
his life to his country on September 29th. He was buried Oct. 
1st in Flanders Field. Yates was one of the best boys the county 
has ever produced. He was true and loyal to his friends as well 
as to his country. He was a faithful member of Mountain Creek 
Baptist church. 

Parks Morris 

Private Parks Morris, the son of Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Morris, 
of Nealsville. He was killed in action October 1918. He was a 
devoted member of the Nealsville Baptist church. He gave his 
life for the cause of democracy and human freedom. He had a 
host of friends and relatives who mourned their loss. 
Robert Goforth 

Private Robert Goforth of Nealsville, died of influenza last 
fall in camp. He was a faithful member of the Bethel Baptist 



30 GREEN RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

church. To know him was to love him. He gave his young life 
that we might live and enjoy life, liberty and the pursuits of hap- 
piness. 

Witcher W. Walker 
Mr. Witcher W. Walker, son of Mr. and Mrs. June A. Walk- 
er of Rutherfordton, R-2, died January 20th, 1919. He had been 
in poor health for three years. He was a graduate of Round Hill 
Academy and Wake Forest College of the class of 1914. He was 
an excellent debater and student. He was a very devoted Chris- 
tian. He was superintendent of Mt. Vernon Sunday school at 
the time of his death. He counted his friends by the hundreds. 
It seems like a tragedy for such a young promising life to be cut 
off, but God knoweth what is best. 



STATISTICAL TABLE 



CHURCHES 



PASTOR 



POST-OFFICE 



CLERK 



POST-OFFICE 





bX) 




C 










o 


a 




rt 




(U 1 


S 


Ph 


H 





O 

O X 

O 

CO 






Lrmstrong 

Jethel 

sethlehem 

Jeulah 

Jig L^vel 

Jill's Creek 

'amp Creek 

'ane Creek 

Chapel mil 

'herry Springs _ 

'lear Creek 

hooper's Gap __ 

'olumbus 

^linchfield 

)ysartsville 

Cast Marion 

ilenwood ^- 

^reen Hill 

Jreenlee 

[armony Grove 

klacedonia 

tiarion First 

ilarion Second _ 

klill Spring 

Montford's Cove 
ilountain Creek 
^ount Vernon _ 

lount View 

klount Pleasant 

fJebo 

)ld Fort 

'iney Knob 

*leasant Grove _ 
*leasant Hill __ 

^ea Ridge 

jMedmont 

^ackolet 

liock Spring 

ilound Hill 

lutherfordton _ 
•tone Mountain 
lunney Vale __ 

ilver Creek 

'urkey Cove __ 
Fhitesides Val. 
V^oodlawn 



S. W^. Shuford _-. 

A. P. Sorrels 

E. W. Church 

J. T. Bowden 

C. G. Walker 

N. L. Wright 

J. H. Smith 

N. U Wright 

F. L. Simmons 

E. W. Church 

W. F. McMahan . 
N. L. Wright 

E. J. Jones 

W. M. Hall 

Lee Jones 

R. G. Short 

J. M. Brown 

B. M, Hamrick __. 
W. F. McMahan _. 

F. L. Simmons 

J. L. Hodge 

J. T. Bowden 

R. G. Short 

E. J. Jones 

M. M. Huntley __. 

J. M. Brown 

J. A. McKaughan 
J. T. Ruppe 

F. J. Huntley 

T. A. Drake 

E. W. Church __. 



J. M. Brown 

M. M. Huntley __ 

E. P. White 

W. M. Gold 

R. N. Pratt 

J. M. Brown 

J. M. Brown 

J. A. McKaughan 

J. A. Nelson 

B. B. Styles 

J. B. Arledge 

S. W. Shuford _- 
N. L. Wright ___ 
T. A. Drake ___. 



Woodlawn 

Union Mills __ 

Old Fort 

Rutherfordton 

Mill Spring 

Rutherfordton 
Cherokee, S. C. 
Rutherfordton 

Nebo 

Old Fort 

Old Fort 

Rutherfordton 

Tryon 

Catalcoche 

Marion 

Marion 

Nealsville 

Rutherfordton 

Old Fort 

Nebo 



ID. P. Hall __. 
If. p. Morgan 
!\V. B. Parker 



Sevier __ 
Nealsville 
Old Fort 



Marion 

Marion 

Tryon 

Rutherfordton 

Marion 

Rutherfordton 
Rutherfordton 
Bear Wallow 

Nebo 

Old Fort ___ 



Nealsville 

Rutherfordton 
Rutherfordton 

Ellenboro 

Hendersonville 

Nealsville 

Nealsville 

Rutherfordton 

Uree 

Cone River 

Saluda 

Woodlawn 

Rutherfordton 
Nebo 



W. J. Wilson 

Paul F. Searcy 

J. W. Coveney 

J. P. Wilson 

B. F. Corpening _. 
A. W. Robertson . 

R. E. Long 

J. L. Jackson 

L. H. Cloud 

A. W. Henson 

W. H. Taylor 

A. K. Flack 

L. A. Raburn 

H. M. Rucker __. 
J. M. Pendergrass 

C. B. Morgan 

B. F. Gallon 

J. Q. A. Michael . 

Carl Lowery 

Jesse Splaw 

E. S. Harris 

H. P. Rucker 

G. E. Morgan 

H. D. Jackson 

J. T. Bland 

R. O. Wilson 

I. L. Copeland 



R. Ledbetter 

F. J. Harton 

W. G. Green ___ 
J. O. Grishold _. 

T. A. Rippy 

H. M. Whitesides 
V/orth Morgan _. 
D. T. McClain __. 

jj. I. Nanney 

J. P. Padgett __. 
JN. B. Arledge _. 
jH. A. Lowery __ 

iG. 'Nanney 

IW. V. Hollifield 



Mill Spring __ 

Uree 

Union Mills 

Mill Spring 

Marion 

Old Fort 

Old Fort 

Mill Spring 

Columbus 

Marion 

Dysartsville _ _ 

Marion 

Nealsville 

Rutherfordton 

Old Fort 

Marion 

Vein Mountain 

Marion 

Marion 

Mill Spring 

Union Mills _-_ 

Gilkey 

Rutherfordton 

Mill Spring 

Redtop 

Nebo« 

Old Fort 



31$ 4 00| 5 
2 1 5001 3 

400| 11 



Uree 

Rutherfordton - 

Mill Spring 

Rutherfordton - 

Lynn 

Mill Spring 

Union Mills __- 
Rutherfordton - 
Black Mountain 

Busick 

Mill Spring 

Sevier 

Uree 

Woodlawn 



4 
1 
1 
2 

41 
31 
2| 
3| 

1 2 3| 

1& 3i 
3 

2& 4 
2 
2 
3 
1 
1 

All 

1& 3| 
31 
31 
31 
41 
4| 

41 
41 
41 



9001 
200| 
500| 
500| 
6001 
600 
600| 
5001 
OOOj 
500| 
0001 



1 


500| 


2 


000 


1 


500| 




3501 


40 


OOOj 



2& 



2& 

2& 



8001 
500| 

oooj 

0001 
500 
500! 
OOOj 
5001 



41 
2| 
2| 
1| 

2& 41 
3| 
3| 

1&3| 
2! 
4i 
2i 
4| 
41 
3| 



1 
2 
1 
4 
1 
1 
2 
15 

1 
2 



500| 

oooj 

0001 

0001 

500i. 

200| 

lOOj 

0001 

8001 

OOOj 

500 1 

3001 

500| 

5001 



1 

9 

3 
15 

3 
24 
11 
20 

41 

41 

3| 

"lol 

91 

3i 

191 

81 

12|. 

21 

41 
1| 
3| 
22| 
31 



1 
11 



Totals , . 1 l$106 450| 319| 



FINANCIAL TABLE 



Ul 








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<x> 


;-l 




m 


m 


03 


M 


biD 


CO 


o 




C 


c 


^ c 


c 


03 


fi 


o 




o 


o 


? O 


O 


c 






43 T3 




a> 'm 


<y to 


'^l 


OS 


. W 


rC 


i*^ 


£ S 


s S 


.^ 


u 


c.. 


^ 


OJ 


ffi 


p^ 


xn 


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g.2 



► 


t 


m 




p_i 




CD «f-( 


-M 


0) 










C 


OJ 


s 


p^ 






l$- 



19 95| 
65 OOj 



1 50| 2 45 

1 1 75 I 



17 80 
5 00 



12 90| 

13 25! 



I$- 



15 70 



5 40|i 
22 10| 
12 001 



1$ 



54 50| 
10 001. 



1 00|$. 
3 05 



25 40 



4.1 90 
375 40 
256 95 



13 55! 

4 02i 

8 00! 

12 00 

23 53 

28 21 

1 00 



44 90 
6 00 
52 63 
22 22 
15 00 
63 75 
15 48 
6 54 
75 27 
15 00 
13 67 



15 35 
63 41 

2 50 

3 25 

16 31 
73 56 



3 00 

5~o6 



15 00 
i7'35 



1 35 

2 50 
1 10 



8 00 
4 46, 

7 75! 



12 50| 12 50 

4 46| 4 46 

7 75i 7 75 



__i 4 00 
001 8 00 

__! 15 6-4 



30 

1 75 
5 00 
1 75 



3 89 



24 35 
12 00 

34 45 
54 



14 00 



4 35 
2 53 



00 
00 
00 
50 
25 



1 60 

2 00 
1 50 



00 
00 

30 I 
50 I 
00 I 
00 I 
90 i 
00 j 
00 I 



7 851 
13 80 
12 00 

2 00 

10 00 

11 48 

10 15 
6 60 

11 00 

6 00 
10 73 

12 69 

7 50 
89 04 

2 00 
6 46 



25 00 

46 12 

3 00 



15 75 
60 00 



8 65 
13 80 
12 00 
1 50 
3 901 
5 481 



8 OOi 

18 40 

12 00 

2 00 

60 00 

8 40 



1 4 00 



6 60 
14 45 

4 00 
10 55 
12 69 

4 20! 
89 04| 

2 00| 

6 461 



6 60 
9 00 

4 08 
12 18 
12 69 

4 20i 

118 72|. 
2 151 
6 46 



3 00| 



18 00 
20 50 
12 00 

5 00 

6 10 

7 48 



27 15j 
35 80| 
3 00| 
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SUNDAY SCHOpL STATISTICS 



CHURCHES 



SUPERINTENDENTS AND THEIR 
POSTOFFICES 





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SECRETARIES AND THEIR POfeT- 
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? Level 

iVs Creek 

mp Creek 

ne Creek 

apelHill 

erry Springs _ 
;ar Creek ___ 
oper's Gap __ 

lunibus 

ncMeld 

sartsviile 

st Marion ' 

mwood 

ien Hill 

senlee 

rmony Grove 

cedonia 

rion First 

rion Second 
I Spring _ _ 
•ntford's Cove 
untain Greek 
unt Vernon '_ 
ant View- _ _ _ . 
unt Pleasant 

30 __ 

[ Fort 

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asant Grove _ 
asant Hill __ 

I Ridge 

dmont 

skolet ..._____ 

ik Spring 

md Hill 

;herfordton _ 
ne Mountain 
iney V«le __ 
'er Creek ___ 
'key Cove __ 
itesides Val. 
odla/wr? 



S. W:. Conley Sevier 

J. N. Morgan Nealsville 

J. F. Turner Old Fort 



Esther Conley 
E. L, Lawing . 
C. C. Siva ___ 



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Old fort 



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T. F. Mills Mill Spring 

Paul F. Searcy Uree, R-1 

C. C. Holler Union Mills 

C. W. Searcy __ Mill Spring 

T. J. Swann Marion 

D. L. Robertson Old Fort 

W. D. Long Old Fort 

J. R. Blanton Mill Spring 

J. P. Arledge Columbus 

J. T. Deviney Marion 

W. H. Taylor Dysartsville 

R. E. Lowdermilk Marion 

J. T. Davis Nealsville 

P. Jones Rutherfordton 

J. M. Pendergrass Old Fort 

W .W. Huskin Marion 

J. W. Wise Vein Mountain 

J. M. Tyler Marion 

John Holcomb Marion 

J. H. Gibbs Mill Spring 

L. D. Hemphill Union Mills 

J. S. Hampton Green Hill 

W. L. Edgerton _____ Rutherfordton 

H. D. Jackson Mill Spring 

C. J. Smith Redtop 

R. 0. Wilson Nebo 

R. F. Hughes Old Fort 



Mamie Wilson __ 
J. C. McDaniel . 
Perry Guffey __ 
Annie B. Frady 
Albert Poteet __ 
V^iola Gilliam __ 
Addie Tuinn ___ 

rearl Ruff 

Maddice Hill ___ 
Marion Seagle _ 

Z. V. Daves 

H. M. Flack ___ 

L. A. Raburn 

Jas. Rucker 

Sidney Hall ___ 
Ennis Lawing __ 
W. E. Watkins _. 
Mattie Gladdon 
Lola Holcomb _. 

Sue Gibbs 

Hicks Hemphill _ 
H. P. Rucker ___ 
S. G. Walker ^_. 
J. T. Jackson __ 
0. V. Taylor __. 

Sallis Gibbs 

Roy Ealy 



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Old Fort 

Old Fort 

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Nealsville 

Rutherfordton 

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Marion 

Vein Mountain 

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__ Union Mills 
Gilkey 

Rutherfordton 
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Ntebo 

Old Fort 



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W. L. Bland _ Rutherfordton 

L. B. Harris Rutherfordton 

W. G. Greer Mill Spring 

G. A. Callahan Rutherfordton 

W. F. Swan Lynn 

O. D. Early Mill Spring 

J. Worth Morgan Union Mills 

F. P. Freeman Rutherfordton 

R. C. Nanney Old Fort 

J. P. Padgett ^__ Busick 

E. A. Arledge Mill Spring 



Sallie Lynch 

F. J. Harton ___ 
J. E. Carswell __. 
C. W. Hodge ___ 
W. J. Ballard ___ 
Mamie Whiteside 

Fred Nanney 

W. A. Harril ___ 
Hattie Nanney __ 
3. B. Padgett __. 
Grace Arledge __ 



Uree 

_ Rutherfordton 

Mill Spring 

_ Rutherfordton 

Lynn 

Uree 

Union Mills 

- Rutherfordton 
Black Mountain 

Busick 

--- Mill Spring 



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G. Nanney Uree 

J. A. Washburn __ Woodlawn 

Totali" 



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Normal Hollifield 



Chimney Rock 
Woodlawn 



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WOMAN'S MiS3IO^ARY UNION 



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Miss Dela Hyder RutherforcMon 

Mrs. T. H. Henderson Ma/ion 

Mrs. W. A. Warrick___R.r herfgrcitoii 
Mrs. John L. Wells ; oresc <Jfty 

Mrs. i. L. Copeland , Old Ifcrt 

Miss Dora Hill Rutherforcfton 

Mrs J. D. Whitesides, Rutherfordtor. 

Miss Clara Morris Uiiion 

Mrs. Lloyd Taylor __ Ruth-^rfr- 


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{ 



ANNUAL 

OF THE 

♦ 

Eightieth Session 

OF THE 

North Carolina Green River 
Baptist Association 

HELD WITH 

Old Fort Baptist Church 
September 30 to Oct. 2, 1920 



ANNUAL 



OF THE 



Eightieth Session 



OF THE 



North Carolina Green River 
Baptist Association 



HELD WITH 



Old Fort Baptist Church 



September 30 to Oct. 2, 1920 



OFFICERS: 

Moderator M. L. Edwards 

Vice Moderator A. P. Sorrels 

Clerk J. A. McKaughan 

Treasurer W. A. Harrill 

Sermon next session by Rev. C. P. Holland. 

Notice to Church Treasurers: Keep up regular offerings month- 
ly for missions and education. Send the money direct to Walter 
Durham, Raleigh, N. C. Take monthly offerings for the Orphanage. 
Send it direct to F. B. Hamrick, Thomasville, N. C. 

To Church Clerks: See Resolutfon on close of Association year, 
and send Church letter to Clerk of Association in due time. . 

The next session of the Association meets with Montford's Cove 
Church, 8 miles from Union Mills beginning on Wednesday before the 
first Sunday in October at 10 o'clock A. M. 

ORDAINED MINISTERS 

Bowden, J. T., Marion, N. C. Laughter, B. C, Mill Spring, N. C. 

Boggs, J. H Marion, N. C. Marshburn, A. B., Nealsville, N C 

Brown, J. M Nealsville, N. C. McDaniel, T. C, Cliffside, N. C. 

Champion, R. C, Landrum, S. C. McMahan, W. F., Old Fort, N. C. 

Denton, J. R., Dysartsville, N. C. McKaughan, J. A,, Rutherfordton 

Green, W. G., Mill Spring, N. C. Nelon, J. A., Mill Springs, N. C. 

Hodge, J. L., Rutherfordton,NC Ruppe, J. T., Rutherfordton, NC 

Htidson, E. v., Louisville, Ky. Sorrels, A. P., Union Mills, N. C. 

Haynes, W. L., Rutherfordton, NC Simmons, F. L Nebo, N. C. 

Harris, B. B., Dysartsville, N. C. Snypes, M. V., Nebo, N. C. 

Holland, C. P Old Fort, N. C. Sisk, J. A Marion, N. C. 

Jones, E. J Tryon, N. C. White, E. P., Rutherfordton NC 

Jones, Lee Marion, N. C. Wise, J. W Spindale, N. C. 

Lowdermilk, D. P., Marion,N. C. Walker, C- G., Mill Spring, N. C. 



CHURCH GROUPS FOR 5th SUNDAY CONVENTIONS 

Group 1 — J. T. Bowden and J. M. Tyler, leaders; Armstrong, 
Bethel, Bethlehem, Chapel Hill, Cherry Springs, Clear Creek, Clinch- 
field, Dysartsville, East Marion, Glenwood, Greenlee, Harmony Grove* 
Macedonia, Marion First, Marion Second, Nebo, Old Fort, Stone 
Mountain, Turkey Cove, Sunny Vale and Woodlawn. 

Group 2 — J. A. McKaughan and M. L. Buchanan, leaders: Bills 

Creek, Camp Creek, Green Hill, Montford's Cove, Mt, Creek, Mt. 

Vernon, Mt. Pleasant, Piney Knob, Pleasant Grove, Pleasant Hill, 

Piedmont, Rockspring, Round Hill, Rutherfordton Whitsides 

Valley and Mt. View, 

Group 3 — E. J. Jones and J, B. Arledge, leaders: Beulah, Big 
Level, Cane Creek, Cooper's Gap, Columbus, Mill Spring, Pea Ridge, 
Packolett and Silver Creek. 

EXECUTIVE BOARD OF MISSIONS 

M.L.Edwards Rutherfordton J. A. McKaughan, Rutherfordton 

C. W. Keeter Rutherfordton J. T. Bowden Marion 

R. P. Greer ,_ .Rutherfordton A. P. Sorrels Union Mills 

J. Lloyd Taylor, Rutherfordton M. L. Buchanan Union Mills 

J. A. McKaughan, Association Member State Board of Missions, 
TRUSTEES ROUND HILL SCHOOL 

J. A. McKaughan, Rutherfordton W. A. Harrill Rutherfordton 

J. T. Bowden Marion M. L. Justice .... Rutherfordton 

J. D. Morris Union Mills E. M. Hairfield, Morganton 

W. G. Scoggins-- Union Mills J. P. Bumgarner .Morganton 

Bynum Berry Valdese A. E. Brown Asheville 

F. A. Bower Morganton M. A. Adams___ -.'Rutherfordton 

STANDING COMMITTEES ON REPORTS FOR NEXT YEAR 

Pastorial Fields and State Churches — E. J. Jones. 

Sunday Schools — M. L. Buchanan. 

Christian Education — W. R. Chambers. 

Round Hill School — Principal Round Hill School. 

Ministerial Relief — R. E. Price. 

Orphanage and Hospital — A. P. Sorrels. 

State Missions — Lee Jones. 

Home Missions — J. T. Bowden. 

Foreign Missions — J. A. McKaughan. 

75 Million Mission Fund— J. M. Tyler. 

Religious Literature — C. P. Holland. 



PROCEEDINGS 

Old Fort, N. C, September 30, 1920. 

The North Carolina Green River Baptist Association met in its 
eightieth Annual Session with Old Fort Baptist Church in McDow- 
ell County at 3:30 o'clock p. m., and was called to order by the 
moderator, M. L. Edwards. Devotional services having been conduct- 
ed, participated in by a number of brethren, while waiting for the 
arrival of the delegates from the southern end of the Association 
on a belated train. Letters were called for and tabulated, and dele- 
gates and pastors enrolled from the churches as follows: 
DELEGATES ENROLLED 

Armstrong — Not represented. 

Bethel: W. C. Raburn, M, C. Morgan, J. H. Morris and E. T. 
La wing. 

Bethlehem: L L. Reel, A. W. Parke, J. F. Turner, W. J. Con- 
drey and J. M. Brigh. 

Beulah: James Smith, Jake Halbert and John Owens. 

Big Level: Jodie Wilson, Sam Henseley, Willie Gilbert, Grover 
Green. 

Bill's Creek: J C. McDaniel, W. C. Dalton, Edgar Conner. 

Camp Creek: J. B. Condrey, T. R. Barnes and Zoluski Clements. 

Cane Creek: J. P. Wilson, J. C. Nelon and R. B, Biddy. 

Chapel Hill: T. J. Swan, A. M. Swan and Charles Poteat. 

Cherry Springs: D. L. Roberson, W. H. Gilliam, I. W. Davis. 

Clear Creek: L. B. Miller, E. D. Ellis, T C. Patton, 

Cooper's Gap: J. W. Biddy, J. M. Bradley, G. S. Whitesides. 

Columbus: Roone Arledge, H. W. Hill and N. L. Mills. 

Clinchfield: O. C. Copeland and A. W. Henson. 

Dysartsville: W. H. Taylor, L. G. Price, C. M. Davis and El- 
bert Sisk. 

East Marion: J. A, Sisk, D. V. Elliott and A. R. Flack. 

Glenwood: B. G. Hensley and John Goforth. 

Green Hill: J. P. Harris and C. H. Hyder. 

Greenlee: D. N. Walker, T. M. Burnett and M. G. Pendergrass. 

Harmony Grove: W. W. Huskin, W. F. Withrow, and J. A. 
Hensley. 

Macedonia: J, A. Radford, C. C. Lawing and B. E. Walker. 

Marion First: J. M. Tyler, J. Q. A. Michael, W. R. Chambers. 

Marion Second: T. M. Hemphill and W. H. Wall. 

Mill Spring: By Letter. 

Monford's Cove: Bratch,er Hall, J. G. Haynes, E. S. Harris, M. 
R. Nanney and C. Y. Banning. 



Mountain Creek: C. C. Bridges, Edgar Lewis, M. C. Queen, and 
P. L. Flinn. 

Mount Vernon: G. E. Morgan, Z. B. Freeman, F. O. Lewis, Wm. 
Ross, B. B. Long, and W. 0. Justice. 

Mountain View: N. C. Burgess, H. H. McCraine, H. D. Jackson. 

Mount Peasant: J. M. Hall, E. W. Hill and O. V. Taylor. 

Nebo: G. D. Taylor and W. F. Brown. 

Old Fort: J. L. Nichols, I. L. Chaplan and R. F. Hughes. 

Piney Knob: No letter. 

Pleasant Grove: G. F. Green, R. Ledbeter and Pinkney Bridges. 

Pleasant Hill: L. B. Harris, D. C. Nanney, C. C. Lovelace, W. C. 
Harris and W. O. Taylor. 

Pea Ridge: T. P. Phillips, James Phillips, Collett Fowler and O. 
W. Ponder. 

Piedmont: J. B. Flynn, C. W. Hodge, C. O. Griswold and W. F. 
Hodge. 

Packolett: By letter. 

Rock Spring: Geo. W. Whiteside, Marion H. Whiteside, Harvey 
M. Whiteside. 

Round Hill: John E. Flack, W. P. Smart, W. M. Nanney, A. R'. 
Nanney, Roy Krouse, Fred Nanney and W. Gower Morgan. 

Rutherf ordton : R. P. Scruggs, J. P. Bean, John Saunders, and 
,A. R. Yelton. 

Stone Mountain: R. C. Nanney. 

Sunney Vale: R. B. Loftis and J. B. Padgett. 

Silver Creek: E. A. Arledge, Clem Arledge, Monroe Sain and 
Frank Green. 

Turkey Cove: No letter. 

Whitesides Valley: John Frady, W. D. Ruppe and Guilford 
Nanney. 

Woodlawn: W. V. Hollifield, J. H. Huskins and J. R. Barrier, 

Oak SpringrO. H. Lane, G. W. Johnson, T. L. Johnson and F. L. 
Pendergrass. 

West Point: J. L. Hodge. 

A larg.e, number of the churches being represented by delegates. 
On motion the association went into the election of officers, which re- 
sulted in the election of M. L. Edwards, Moderator, A. P. Sorrels, 
Vice Moderator, J. A. McKaughan, Clerk and W. A. Harrill Treasurer. 

Oak Spring and West Point Baptist churches made application 
for membership into the Association, and on motion wer,e unanimously 
received, and the hand of welcome given them by the moderator. 

On motion a committee was appointed on Order of Business, and 



imm,«diately reported an Order of Business, which was adopted. 

New pastors were introduced and commended to the body by Rev. 
J. T. Bowden, C. P. Holland, Old Fort and E. P. White, Oak Spring, 
and M. L. Buchanan, Round Hill. 

As provided by the order of business the report on Periodicals 
was presented by J. Q. A. Michael, and on motion was adopted. 
Pending the adoption it was discussed by J. T. Bowden, M. L. Ed- 
wards, R. G. Short and J. A, McKaughan. 

REPORT ON PERIODICALS 

First is the "Biblical Recorder" published at Raleigh, N C. Edit- 
ed by our able and elERcient brother Livingston Johnson. 

For 87 years the Biblical Record^er has been the organ of North 
Carolina Baptists, During all this time it has given its influence to 
the promotion of every department of denominational work. Its 
columns are used freely by the servants of th,e denomination who have 
charge of our institutions. 

The paper is true to its name. It is biblical in its teachings 
and records the acts of North Carolina Baptists from week to week. 
It stands for the truth as Baptists hold and interpret it and is al- 
ways ready to defend our great principles. 

Its columns carry wholesome matter into the family circle. It 
takes note of current events and publishes a digest of important 
things that occur during the w,eek. News letters from the churches 
are a very important and helpful feature. The last page of the Re- 
corder is for the home and great care is taken in selecting matter 
for this page,. 

The Recorder is owned by a joint stock company. It was or- 
ganized at the request of the convention 20 years ago. But while it 
was under private ownership, a committee appointed by the Con- 
v,ention acts with the directors when necessary. This puts the se- 
lection of an editor practically in the hands of the convention. 

The directors found it absolutely necessary to raise the price of 
the paper on August 1st to $2.50. They regretted v,ery deeply the 
necessity which forced them to take this step. But the two alter- 
natives were to increase th,e price or reduce the size. The Recorder 
was not making expenses at $2 a year. The directors promised sa- 
credly that as soon as conditions warrant them in going back to the 
old price they will do so. 

The Recorder management has made a price to the churches 
which will make it possible for them to keep the price at $2 per year. 
If a church will put the Recorder in three-fourths of the resid,e,nt fam- 



ilies and send the names of the one in each family to whom the pa- 
per is to be sent together with a check to cover the amount of sub- 
scription, the paper will be sent to each individual as at present for 
$2 a year. If a church finds it more convenient to pay in monthly 
or quarterly installments, the managem,ent will accept that method of 
payment. 

A good many churches are putting the Recorder in the budget. 
A collection is taken for the Recorder fund just as is done for State 
missions, or any other object, and the paper is sent to the ones whose 
names are forwarded. If a church shall adopt the budget plan and 
see that the Reqorder goes into 75 per cent of the homes the sub- 
scription price will be $2. 

The Recorder is essential to the progress of our work and it ex- 
erts a very wholesome influence in the home. We earnestly urge our 
churches to accept the liberal offer made by th,e management and 
secure the paper at $2 per year. 

Next in importance is "Charity & Children," published at Thom- 
asville, N. C, by and in the interest of our Orphan Childr,en. Edited 
by brother Archibald Johnson. Established in 1887, two years af- 
ter the establishment of our orphanage, which is now 35 years old. 

This paper is^now a welcome visitor in the homes of near 20,- 
000 people telling each week about our 531 children which we are sup- 
porting at a cost of $150,000 yearly. W,e should take this paper, first' 
because it is printed by and in the interest of our own dear children, 
and because we get so much good information. 

Many Sunday Schools are taking this paper in clubs. We recom- 
mend that all Sunday Schools do likewise, securing it at the price of 
60c p,er copy the year or $1.00 for the single subscription. 

Next is "Home&Foreign Fields'" published at Nashville, Tenn., by 
our Sunday School Board in the interest of our denominational work, 
representing all the different objects of our Southern Baptist Con- 
vention, cover.ed by our 75 Million Campaign, giving each month a 
detailed report of the work and needs of our various Missionaries, 
in the various parts of the world. 

The September issue gave a photograph of the steamship Em- 
press of Japan and our new missionaries, which sailed from Van- 
couver, B. C, on August 17th, carrying near 100 of our first new 
Missionaries, made possible by the 75 Million Campaign. 

With what mingled feeling of pride and humility do we look 
into the faces of these brave young men and women, who go as our 
repr.esentatives into the midst of the heathenism of China and Jap- 
an. God help us to be faithful to them as they are faithful to 



Christ, supporting them with our money and upholding them with 
our prayers. We are informed that other workers for South Africa 
and Africa are under appointment and will sail at an early date. 
The objective of the foreign board for the five-years is five hundred 
missionaries in all our fields. 

Eight of these new missionaries are from our state. Are we 
not proud of that? Let's pray brethren that during the next five 
years the Lord may call some of our numt^er from this association, 
for we feel that no greater blessing could come to us. 

The subscription price of this journal is $1.00 a year single copy 
oi- m clubs of 10 one extra copy is given, it is indeed a fine journal, 
and all our peop],e should take it. 

Next is "Royal Service" published in Baltimore, Md., by our 
Woman's Missionary Union, Literary Department. This is especial- 
ly in the interest of the woman's missionary work, published at the 
price of 35c a year. 

If we would be a w.ell rounded and informed Bapiist, we should 
take all these periodicals, especially the "Biblical Recorder," "Charity 
and Children," "Home and Foreign Fields," annual cost $4.50. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. Q. A. MICHAEL, Com. 

The report on Ministerial Relief was th,en called for, and was 
read l:)y J. M. Tyler. The report was then discussed by J. M. Tyler, 
H. F. Freeman and R. G. Short, and adopted. 

REPORT ON MINISTERIAL RELIEF 

From the beginning of man's sojourn on earth, there has been 
a tendency to honor the heroes of all generations — of all classes and 
avocation. 

We find from the history of the Old Testament period, that the 
people honored, loved and cherished, the lives and work of their hero,es 
and most of all, the great patriots of the people of God. In the Dark 
Ages, or the beginning of the New T,estament history, we also find 
that there was more attention given to Statesmen, heroes of war 
and leaders of State. This tendency to honor the heroes of oth- 
er than the Kingdom Builders, grew until we have reached the point 
where the man who devotes his lifle, his talents to the work of the 
Kingdom of God, is no longer reverenced, honored and loved as the 
great statesmen and heroes. 

Civilization, in its rapid growth, has to a certain extent, n,eg- 
lected the great heroes who have stood for principal, righteousness 
and Christianity. In our States and in the National Capital, we 



find monuments to the dead who have given their liv^es in service for 
the County, or State, or Nation, but nowhere do we find material 
monuments to the ministers of God. It is with painful embarrass- 
m,ent that we think of these conditions where the trend of the human 
mind, with the progress of civilization, have neglected to honor the 
servants of God as marked and as patriotically as they have the ser- 
vants of State. 

In order that our civilization shall not crumble with d,ecay, let 
us, as Christian people, more reverently honor the heroes and ser- 
vants of the Kingdom of God. May the time soon come when the 
last resting place of the ministers of God will be covered with monu- 
ments built by Christian love, so that in the ages to come they may 
look back upon us as a people who honored our Christian dead. 

Does the aged minister who has given his life to the cause of 
Christ n,eed money and money only? Many an aged minister has 
perished — not only for the lack of material things, but for the lack of 
love, kindness, reverence and honor, for his achievements. If our 
people would bestow these upon our aged ministers, though poor ma- 
terially, they would be rich in the evening of their lives because of the 
happiness brought to them by the peopl.e whom they have served. 

We are glad that there is a marked tendency toward bettering the 
conditions of the aged ministers. The Seventy-Five Million Cam- 
paign managers have allotted $300,000 for the aged ministers of North' 
Carolina for a period of five years, making $60,GK)0 00 per year for the 
aged ministers in our state. 

Another change that has been made in the work of ministerial 
relief is that of funds for ministerial relief, which ar,e now handled 
through the Southern Baptist Convention, that each State in the con- 
vention have its allotment and each State maintain its Board through 
which applications for relief are made. 

In the year 1917 the state paid $6,240.49 to ministerial relief. 

In the year 1918 the state paid $6,4^38.18 to ministerial relief. 

In the year 1919 to the date of September 24th, $5,639.39 was 

reported, and if the pledges, made to the Seventy- Five Million Cam- 
paign through the state of North Carolina, are paid, the aged minis- 
ters of our state will receive, at the hands of the Board, $60,000.00 — 
an increase of about 1200 per cent. 

Let every Christian in Green R'^^er Association make dear to his 
heart the Christian heroes of our Association, State and Nation, and 
may no aged minister in our midst suffer financial^ — ^^^ ^ay they 
be made rich with our love, honor and respect. May they feed upon thpi 
smiles, cheerfulness and means of the peop],e whom they have served, 

10 



thus shaping and directing the trend of human ideals, thoughts, efforts 
and love, to the building of the Kingdom of God, and to the honoring 
of its heroes, standard bearers. 

J. M. TYLER. 
On motion the session adjourned with song and prayer to meet at 
7:30 o'clock. 

NIGHT SESSION 

The Association met according to adjournment at 7:30 p. m., 
and was caUed to order by the Moderator, and opened with song and 
prayer. 

The Moderator then introduced Rev. J. T. Bowden, pastor of 
First church, Marion, who preached the sermon, using for his text 
Exodup 32:29, and 1 Chronicles 29:5. Subject: "A More Thorough- 
ly Consecrated Membership." 

After the clos,e of the sermon, and prayer by Bro. A. P. Sor- 
rels the report on Woman's Work was read by M. M. Huntley, and 
was spoken to by M. M. Huntley and M. A. Adams, and on motion 
adopted, 

Thf» Moderator recognized and introduced brethren F. B. Ham- 
rick, of the Baptist Orphanage, and M. A. Adams, Enlistment 
Evangelist, in this and other Associations. 

On motion the Moderator appointed the {following commit- 
tees : 

Committee to nominate Trustees Round Hill School: G. E. Mor- 
gan, W. H. Taylor and R. Ledbettcr. 

Committee to nominate Executive Board of Missions: E. J. Jones, 
W. F. McMahan and L,ee Jones. 

Committee on Time, Place, and Preacher: D. C. Nanney, Harvey 
M. Whitesides and F. L. Pendergrass. 

Committee on Resolutions: N. L. Wright, J. M. Simmons and 
R. F. Hughs. 

The Association then adjourned with prayer by W. F. McMahan 
to meet Friday morning at 9 o'clock a. m. 

FRIDAY MORNING 

Th,e Association met at 9 o'clock, and was called to order by the 
Moderator, and Bro. H, F. Freeman led in song and prayer service. 

The report on Sunday Schools was then called for and read 
by E. J. Jones, and then spoken to by E. J. Jones, F. L. Simmons, F. 
B. Hamrick, J. T. Bowden and H. F. Freeman, and on motion adopted. 

11 



SUNDAY SCHOOL REPORT 

In submitting this report your committee is painfully aware of 
the fact thav no accurate data being obtainable, it is well nigh impos- 
sibl,€i to give a detailed view of the Sunday School situation, since this 
Association met last year. The lamentable fact as set forth in the 
Sunday School report of last year, disclosing the condition that about 
one-fifth of our church people in this Association attend Sunday 
School, leavmg four-fifths of our church members who do not at- 
tend, must impress upon us the absolute ne^ed of a reawakening among 
all our Sunday School forces, and a determination to make our Sunday 
School forces function more efficiently in the community life of our 
people. 

Nothing could be more serious than this condition among our 
people, and should constitute a tremendous appeal to the delegates 
assembled here, as a cause of deep concern and prayerful anxiety 
that such conditions obtain. 

As compared to last year's report we find a small increase in 
number of schools that keep open (every Sunday in the year, there 
being a gain of 10 schools in the ever green list. There has also 
been a slight increase in our gifts to the Orphanage over last 
year, an increas,e of $82.65. 

While these are signs of awakening still the sad fact remains 
that we have made little progress in enlisting the support or inter- 
est of the larger part of the church members of the Association in 
Sunday School work. 

One ot the greatest problems facing us today is the stamping 
out of the moral ignorance of our people, and putting in its place 
the moral and spiritual teachings of the Bible. This woeful lack 
on the part of our people suggests one of the forces for which our 
Sunday Schools stand, namely the moral and religious training of 
our young people. Its educational value in spreading and inculcat- 
ing the teachings and principles of God's Eternal truth, is second 
only to that of the Church, and in some respects enters more fully 
into th,e home life of its members, and becomes the great moral 
force of the community. Nowhere else do our people get a better 
knowledge of God's truth, or understand its teachings, as they are 
set forth in living characters and principles through the medium of 
Sunday School work and teaching. 

Humanity in living characters is pictured to us through the 
lessons, and the operation and saving power of God's grace are 
wrought out as we study each life and each object. We \eam at 
Sunday School as nowhere else the stately marchings of God's pur- 

12 



pose in the world, and His dealings with mankind. 

Its educational idea is based on the ethics of Jesus Christ, and 
th,e cardinal principles of the Gospel must be fundamental to all our 
teaching. The live and wide awake Sunday School of today be- 
comes one of the greatest constructive forces in the modern life 
and thought of our day, as through its teaching force it builds in- 
to the heart and lives of our young people the Christian character 
that sooner or later becomes the ideal of the future. 

As we face the coming days, fraught with the spiritual destiny 
of our young people, together with the problems of (economic and 
industrial life, the problems of our social order, and the great seeth- 
ing mass of socialistic and anarchistic tendencies, that seem to be 
spreading to all lands and p,eoples, we begin to realize the impera- 
tive need, hitherto neglected, of laying a good, strong foundation for 
the moral character of our young people, as they enter into life, and 
face its problems. 

The most appaling revelation of the war, from a religious 
standpoint, was a lack of comprehension of the simple elements of re- 
ligious faith and life running parallel with a deep religiolus instinct, 
yet the country is spending billions of dollars developing the most 
effective public school system the world has ever known, and the 
Church is busier than ever before on its great missionary program, 
yet the rank and file of our people seem blind to our real danger, 
the lack of a fundamental religious training. What are cAir Sunday 
School forces for, if not to meet and supply in part this great need of 
our young people? What a comprehensive and mighty appeal do 
these facts make to the Christian manhood of our Association, and 
how it ought to stir us into a more earnest and more d^etermined ef- 
fort to increase the number and efficiency of our beloved Sunday 
Schools. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. J. JONES, Committee^ 

A resolution was presented and spok,en to by J. M. Tyler, provid- 
ing for the appointment of a committee of two; one for the Southern 
end and one for the Northern end of the Association, whose duty it 
will be to arrange for volunte.er mission work in pastorless churches 
and destitute places by laymen. After discussion by Bro. Tyler thje 
resolution was adopted. 



13 



RESOLUTIONS OF ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONS 

WHEREAS, We have 48 churches in Green River Association, 
with only two churches having services ,each' Sunday, and ten churches 
having services two Sundays in each month, and thirty-four churches 
having services only once a month with large areas of territory for 
churches or services and, 

WHEREAS, We have men and women, though not ordained, who 
are qualified both as to preparation and spirituality, and who 
ar,e willing to work in the capacity of laymen for the uplift of our 
work and the upbuilding of the Kingdom be it resolved: 

That a committee of one be appointed for that part of the asso- 
ciation in McDowell County and a committee of one for that part of 
the association of Rutherford county, whose duty it shall be to gather 
facts as to ne,eds of our various churches and communities and have 
on file a list of volunteers who will go where directed on Sunday morn- 
ings or Sunday afternoons, and there work the people either by making 
talks or organizing Sunday Schools, or in any capacity the occasion 
may require; and then upon invitation from any church, ask some 
m^ember of the volunteer club to meet an appointment at such a place, 
at a given date, etc. The result being — splendid training for the 
volunteers and extra services for the more destitute churches or com- 
munities. 

J. M. TYLER. 

Rev. S. T. Hensley, pastor Biltmore, and Rev. Creal, Assistant 
Secretary of Mountain Schools, were recognized and welcomed to the 
body. 

The report was then read on the Orphanage by H. F. Freeman, 
and on motion was adopted. Pending th,e adoption the report was 
discussed by F. B. Hamrick, M. A. Adams, and Dr. Walter N. John- 
son. 

REPORT OF ORPHANAGE 

The Orphanage at Thomasville, N. C, is a Baptist Orphanage. 
It was instituted, and is owned by the Baptists of the State. This 
Orphanage is the greatest denominational institution in the State. 
Becaus,e, First: It is a benevolent institution, for it takes care of the 
orphan and the fatherless, and that is religion, James 1:27. Second: 
It educates and trains for a Christian life of service, and that is Bib- 
lical. Peter 3:18. Third: It is evangelical; a large per cent of 
those who have r.eceived its benevolent and educational blessings, have 
also been bom into the kingdom of Christ. Now since it takes care 
of the fatherless, and motherless, and helpless children, and gives the 

14 



educational and Christian advantages as named abov,e,, we will all 
agree, that it is the greatest institution in the state. (The local 
Baptist church excepted). Now brethren this institution is ours, 
and we should all rally to its support. 

The only thing we se,e wrong with it is, that it is too small to 
care for all who need its protection and help. We Baptists of the 
State can remedy that. 

Brethren the changed conditions, that seem to be casting a shadow 
over thiQ. business of the country, and causing some plants to run on 
part time, does not affect our plant at Thomasville. It runs on 
full time, and we are the stock holders. The 500 and more children 
who are there constitute our stock, and it is with us as to whether 
this shall be worth more or ],e,ss while these unsettled days in bus- 
iness, etc., are on. It takes food and clothes to run it, and let us 
not forget, but be diligent in its support. 

I shall not give statistics as that comes annually from the man- 
agement of the* Orphanage, and you can get it there^ 

Our poss,e,ssions in land and equipment are great; and then the 
children, all are ours and we are God's. For Christ's sake let's 
make it pay. 

H. F. FREEMAN, Com. 

The body then arose and sang: "I am thine, O Lord." 
The subject of "Pastorates" was called, and R. G. Short was ask- 
ed to introduce the subject which he did. The subj,e,ct was then 
fully and informally discussed by Brethren A. P. Sorrels, M. A. 
Adams, and Walter N. Johnson. Following the discussion a motion 
was passed appointing a Pastor and Deacons Conference to meet at 
Round Hill November 23-24, 1920 at 11 a. m. Th,e following were 
appointed to prepare a program for the conference: E. J. Jones, 
A. P. Sorrels and J. A. McKaughan. 

A resolution was then introduced asking for the employment of 
an Enlistment Evangelist for the Gre,en River and Sandy Run Asso- 
ciations, and the Catawba River, if advisable. Rev. J. T. Bowden 
spoke to the resolution. At the close of his address the discussion 
was suspended for adjournment for dinner, and on motion the body 
adjoum,e,d to meet at 1:45 p. m. 

FRIDAY AFTERNOON 

The Association r.eassembled according to adjournment, and 
was opened with song and prayer. 

The resolution on the Enlistment Evangelist was then further 
discussed, and on motion adopted. 

15 



RESOLUTION 

At the request of the members of the Mobile School held with 
Rutherfordton Baptist Church July, 1920, the Executive Boards of 
Green River and Sandy Run Associations nitet in Rutherfordton Bap- 
tist Church September 10, 1920, to consider the matter of securing an 
Enlistment Evangelist for work in the two Associations. 

The advisability of securing an Enlistment Evangelist for the two 
Associations was carefully considered and fully discussed, and the 
undersigned were requested to present the following resolution: 

Whereas, there is great need in th,e churches of the Green River 
and Sandy Run Associations, of better organization and an awakened 
interest in Sunday School and Young People's Work, and the salva- 
tion of the lost at home and abroad; therefore b,e it resolved: 

(1) That it is the sense and opinion of the Executive Boards of 
the Green River and Sandy Run Associations, that an Enlistment 
Evangelist, for the two Associations, is vitally needed to hold enlist- 
m,ent evangelistic meetings with our churches, and in cooperation 
with the pastors better organize and develop them in all lines of our 
organized work, and to secure the cooperation of the pastors and 
churches in patronizing and supporting the Christian Schools in the 
two Associations. 

(2) That the two Associations, through their Executive Boards, 
s,e,cure the cooperation and aid of the State and Home Mission Boards' 
in the support of an Enlistment Evangelist to the amount of two thirds 
of the salary, and that the two Associations agree to raise one third 
of the salary, and this to be paid, as far as possible, by contributions 
from churches with which the Enlistment Worker holds meetings. 

(3) That all contributions given by the church<es for the sup- 
port of the enlistment evangelistic work be sent to the treasurer of 
the State Convention where it will be credited on missions to the 
church s,ending it. 

(4) That it is the opinion and request of the two Executive 
Boards, that the two associations adopt a resolution asking the State 
and Home Mission Boards to cooperate with the Executive Boards in 
securing an enlistment evangelist worker, to enter on the work at the 
beginning of the next Convention year. 

(5) That should the Enlistment Evangelist be secured the work 
shall be under the direction of th«e Executive Boards and the Enlist- 
ment Worker. 

(6). That these resolutions be presented to the Associations at 
their next meeting for their consideration and approval. 

M. L. EDWARDS. 

16 



Committee to nominate Executive Board of Missions reported, 
and the report was adopted. (See List of Executive Committee). 

Committee to nominate Trustees of Round Hill School reported, 
and report was adopted. (See List of Trustees). 

Committee on time, plac,e and preacher recommended that the 
next session of the Association meet with Montford's Cove Baptist 
church on Thursday before the 1st Sunday in October, 1921, and 
that Rev. C. P. Holland preach the sermon. The report was 
adopted. 

Following the adoption of this report a motion was made to 
change the phrase in the Constitution, to read Wednesday before the 
first Sunday in October instead of Thursday before the first Sunday, 
and the motion was unanimously carried. Thus by the change of 
the Constitution the report of the committee on the time was chang- 
ed, and the Association will meet Wednesday before the 1st Sunday in 
October. 

Rev. Taylor (colored), pastor of the colored Baptist church at 
Rutherfordton, was recognized and introduced by the Moderator, and 
presented the work of the colored Baptist Church at Rutherfordton 
and its needs, and kindly asked for any aid the body might give. 

The Association gave its endorsement to the work, and made a 
contribution to the amount of $18.00, and was placed in the hands of 
the Moderator, M. L. Edwards, to be turned ov.er to the work in the 
erection of a house of worship for the colored Baptists. And the 
churches of the Association were requested to make a contribution 
to this work, and to send such contribution to M. L. Edwards. 

Dr. Walter N. Johnson, Secr.etary of Missions, was at this time 
introduced, and made an inspiring address on the "Greater Task of 
North Carolina Baptists." 

At the close of Bro. Johnson's address the Association was very 
much interrupted by the departure of many of the delegates, who 
were under necessity of leaving, because of the schedule of the train. 
But enough w,ere left to conduct the remainder of the business. 

The report on State Missions, prepared by Bro. M. L. Buchanan, 
was taken up and adopted without reading. 



17 



REPORT ON STATE MISSIONS 

With us, State Missions mean missions in North Carolina. The 
work is State wide in its scope. State missions work is funda- 
mental. It is at the foundation of all other denomination work. 
Many of our stronger churches were in their beginning aided by the 
State Mission Board. That helped them to get on their feet, and to 
tak,e their place in the great work they are doing in the Lord's king- 
dom. Our Sate mission work is conducted through a number of de- 
partments. But we will consider the most important. 

First: Finance: The total receipts last year were $74,066.20. 
The Board aided 242 churches, and supplimented the salary of 170 
missionary pastors. The 242 churches raised for benevolences $35,- 
297,31. The Board spent $3,100 in aiding weak churches in build- 
ing houses of worship. We would suggest that there is need in many 
places for aid to weak churches in building a church house. 

Second: The Sunday School work conducted by State Missions. 
There w^ere enrolled in the 242 mission churches last year 12,611 Sun- 
day School members, with an average attendance of 8,588. The Sun- 
day School work is primary in mission work. Through it many 
churches have been started. It is both evangelistic and educational 
in its scope, teaching and enlightening th,e, people, and preparing the 
way for the preaching of the gospel. Sunday School work in a 
destitute place is truly State mission work. 

Third: Evangelism. Through the aid of the State Board of 
Missions 242 churches were saved with the gospel, and 7,705 ser- 
mons were preached, and from these there were 1,478 professions of 
faith in Christ, 1,012 additions to the churches by baptism, 1,176 re- 
ceived by letter. This is our first work, for the Lord said, "That 
repentance and remission of sins should be preached in his name 
among all nations, beginning at Jerusalem." 

And the time will never come when the numb,er of people con- 
verted will not be the most vital test of our loyalty to our savior. 

It is a great thing to send the Word to those who never heard 
it. In order to do that w,e must have it in our own hearts, and must 
have men and women to go with the Word. To that end we must 
bring the lost of our State to Christ. We love to think of our land 
as a place where Christ is known; but there are thousands of unsaved 
souls in our own State, and a great number of our members who 
are not enlisted in missions. That furnishes a field of mission work 
in our own churches to those who are actively en«:aged in the Lord's 
work. There is a place open to all who will work, and the Lord 
says, "Son go work today in my vineyard." 

M. L. BUCHANAN. 

18 



The report on Home Missions was read by Bro. J. T. Bowden, and 
on motion was adopted. 

HOME MISSION REPORT 

The foundations of America are fundamentaly religious, and the 
only spirit which may be trusted adequately to safeguard them is that 
of Christian patriotism. 

Following the World War and in the midst of Reconstruction 
problems, thousands of our people have made a new dedication of 
themselves to this Christian Americanism, and in no section more than 
in the South, where the largest proportion of native Americans re- 
side. They propose to safeguard American liberties by safeguard- 
ing that faith which alone made those liberties possible, and to keep 
lighted in America a beacon of .liberty which shall shine out 
across the seas to cheer and bless people who grope in darkness. 

Christian Americanism is the work of Home Missions, which by 
bringing men to Christ, creates that righteousness that exalteth a na- 
tion. Our Baptist Home Mission Board is the outstanding agency of 
Southern Baptists for making America Christian. It has a great 
record of successful service, but is now entering on a time of 
even larger opportunity and need. 

In 1919 the missionaries of our Board baptised one convert for 
every three received into our churches. Regularly they baptise 
from twenty to twenty-five per cent as many converts as the entire 
number who enter our churches. For fifteen years its Evangelists 
have averaged 450 baptisms per year per worker, a record far out- 
stripping that of any other similar agency. Its system of Moun- 
tain Schools is larger than any other and is the acknow],edged stan- 
dard in adaptability. Its Enlistment work is rapidly bringing a more 
adequate standard of spiritual instruction and effectiveness in hun- 
dreds of churches. Its Church Extension work has grown from in- 
fancy to lusty strength in a p,eriod of only a few years. 

Recently the Board has also far surpassed its own fine record. 
Within the last seven years of its history of seventy-five years its 
nissionaries have baptised 94.5 per cent as many converts as were 
baptised in the first sixty-eight years. 

In soul-winning and nation-serving; in teaching the .truth of 
Christ and conserving it; in building Christians up and maturing for 
the State the type of character that makes our Republic gr.eat, and in 
the end, must save it from disintegration, our Board has been wonder- 
fully used of God. 

Every loyal Baptist will rejoice in the admirable efforts of our 

li) 



Board to meet the crucial needs of these days by enlarging its work. 
At its annual meeting in Atlanta in June, after long and painstak- 
ing efforts to reduce th,e appropriations as far as possible, the 
brethren of the Board found that $2,875,000 was necessary for the 
work of the present year. Even with this appropriation, it had to 
decline many worthy appeals to enter wide open doors. 

We commend our Board for its faith and vision in grappling the 
stupendous tasks that now confront us and in believing that our 
people will respond to such leadership. We recommend that con- 
stant prayers be made for the Board, for its missionaries and for 
its work, and that we give it large and sustained support through our 
gifts to the 75 Million Campaign. 

We commend to our people the admirable Mission Study Books 
of the Board, through which a true vi,ew is presented of the large 
problems we confront, and recommend that pastors, superintendents, 
mission society leaders and others write often for the large and splen- 
did assortment of fr,ee tracts about its work and the needs, which our 
Board gladly furnishes on request. 

The executive officer of the Board is Dr. B. D. Gray, Correspond- 
ing Secretary,, Healey Building, Atlanta, Ga. For tracts, books, in- 
formation, etc., address Publicity Department, Baptist Hom,e Mission 
Board, Healey Building, Atlanta, Ga. 

Reaipectfully submitted, 

J. T. BOWDEN. 

The report on Foreign Missions was adopted without discussion. 
REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS 

We are taught in the Scripture that the "tre,e is known by its 
fruit." In the business and intellectual world results count. Also 
in the religious world results tell of the success of the gospel. 

Again th,e. Scripture teaches that, "One soweth, and another 
reapeth." Some plant, others water; but God giveth the blessings. 
Carey, and Judson, and Yates spent many years in foreign lands 
with very few visible results. They wer,^ planting the gospel. Those 
who have followed them did the watering. And now the gospel has 
grown to be a great tree, and the modem missionari^e^ are produc- 
ing the greater visible results. The providence of God has per- 
mitted us to live in a time when the world is wide open to the gos- 
pel. The way is now open to proclaim Christ to all nations. 

Let us note some of the results of Foreign Missions: In 1881 
when Dr. R. T. Bryan landed in Shanghai, China, there were only 
four missionari,es in Central China, Dr. and Mrs. Yates, Rev. and Mrs. 

20 



Hannix. Now there are forty-five. They had one station. 
Now there are four. They had three churches with a mem- 
bership of less than 100; but now there are 38 churches with a mem- 
bership of 3,000. They had no schools. Now there are 40 with 
more than 2500 pupils. They had no Sunday Schools, but now there 
are 38. The Southern Baptist Board owned in Central China less 
than one acre of land, but now they have some s,eventy acres, and 57 
buildings, and rent a great many more. 

In all the Southern Baptists have 542 churches on the foreign 
fields. One fourth of these churches ar,e self supporting. More 
than one half of them worship in houses, owned either by the church- 
es or the Board. Last year 6834 were baptised. This is the largest 
number ever in one year. The total membership in our churches on 
the foreign fields is 57,438. Last year these native churches contrib- 
uted $242,460, which represents a gift of $4.22 per member. This 
is a good showing when compared with the per capita gifts by the 
home churches. The report of May 1919 shows that the home churches 
gave $6.19 per member. The 75 Million Campaign has inspired the 
foreign churches with a missionary zeal. And similar campaigns 
have been organized in all our foreign fiplds, and more than a million 
dollars was pledged by the native churches. This is significant, for 
the future development of the churches. All who had a worthy share 
in the Campaign should be encouraged at the success our Campaign 
brought to our foreign missionaries who represent us at the front. 
It should inspire us to meet our pledges fully, that these d,ear work- 
ers in the far land may be strengthened in their glorious task. 

The Sunday School work is encouraging. There are 836 or- 
ganiz,ed Schools with 47,672 pupils, and 83 per cent of the church 
membership is in the Sunday School. Education is a great factor 
in the foreign mission work. Last year the Board had 554 schools 
of all grades with an enrollment of 18,514 students. In these 
schools many are reached and lead to Christ, and from thes,e come 
Christian workers. It is encouraging to know that there are 545 
students in the Theological Schools. The medical missionary is do- 
mg a great work. In 1919 205,098 patients were tr,eated and many 
heard the gospel from the medical missionary. Through them the 
message was sent into many homes, which might have never heard it. 
Thus the work goes under the blessing of God. Let us make His 
praise even more glorious by pressing on and increasing the work 
until the whole earth shall be filled with His knowledge and glory. 

J. M. BROWN. 

Following the reading of these reports Bro. J. T. Bowden made a 

21 



splendid talk on missions. 

The R. L. Patton "Memorial" was present^e.d by J. A. McKaughan, 

which contemplates raising an endowment fund, the interest of 

which shall go to the support of a ministerial student in High School, 

was endorsed by the Association, provided the fund b,e used for tne 

support of a ministerial student at Round Hil] School 

A resolution authorizing the appointment of a committee of two 
in each church on property valuation was presented by Bro. J. T. 
Bowden, and on motion adopt,e4. 

RESOLUTION 

Whereas many of our churches do not know their wealth, and 
therefore do not know their opportunities and responsibilities, there- 
fore be it resolved: 

That a committee of two in each church in the Association be 
appointed by the moderator, whose duty it shall be to secure from 
Property Valuation Books of the county and township where the 
members of said churches reside, the valuation of the prope,rty of 
each member, and report the total valuation of wealth of each 
church at the next session of the Association; and should a large 
numb,e,r of the members of any church be wage earners, that a fair 
estimate of wages per month be made and reported, and that these 
totals from each church be printed in the minutes of the Associa- ' 
tion. 

J. T. BOWDEN. 

The moderator not being prjssent when the above resolution was 
passed, and not being sufficiently advised as to the names of suitable 
brethren in the churches to compose the committee for each church 
provid<ed for in the foregoing resolution recommends that the sev- 
eral churches appoint their own committee to secure the informa- 
tion provided for in the above resolution, and report to the next 
session oi the Association. 

On motion the Association adjourned until 7:30 p. m. Prayer 
by E. J. Jones. 

FRIDAY NIGHT 

The Association reconvened at 7:30 p. m., and was opened with 
song and prayer and a talk by Bro. A. P. Sorrels, and was then 
called to order by Bro. Sorrels, Vice Moderator. 

A telegram was r.ead from Prof. Jas. N. Bragg, Principal of 
Round Hill School, expressing his regret for being unable to attend 
the Association. 

22 



The report was read by Bro. Sorrels on Christian Education, 
and after discussion by Bro. Sorrels and Bro. Creal, Assistant to 
Dr. A. E. Brown in our School work, the report was adopt^e^d. 

CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

By Christian Education we mean a practical combination of 
knowledge and wisdom, of the Christian religion. 

Now faith or belief is the starting point of Christianity. Faith 
acted upon proves Christ and His religion a reality. Having this 
knowledge in himself th,e Christian applies this knowledge to prac- 
tical purposes. We call this wisdom. 

There are two ways by which we obtain Christian education. 
1st. External How do we happen to know anything about 
Christ and his religion? Because we have be,en taught the doct- 
rines about Him. Some may sneer and call this traditionalism. 
But the fact remains that the greater part of what we know is tak- 
en on trust from others. 2nd. INTERNAL. Observation forms 
a conn,«cting link between the two sources of education. We 
should be constantly on the lookout for more. In observation, re- 
flection, is very necessary so that we may hold fast to all that is 
good and true, and dismiss all that is false. Turn the things that 
we learn over in our minds. Compare them, test th«em, reason up- 
on them, prove them. The doctrines of Christ well studied and 
rightly understood strengthen the mind and purify the life. 

We find that there are many things in the Christian religion 
we can only understand by experience. Experience is observation 
and study acted upon, worked out in the individual Christian's life, 
and so is his greatest source of internal education it must be 
to the Christian the final court of a^ppeal. Are the doctrines of 
Christianity a reality? We knew by experience they are. This 
experience combines mental know],edge, heart feeling, surrendered 
will. 

Denominational schools is one branch of christian education. 
We consider our schools as only one branch of education, yet a 
very important branch. In these, men and women, who ha%e been 
taught extensively, have time and opportunity to teach others. Young 
m.en and women by application and contact may grow in knowledge 
and in truth. Receive to give is one law of education. 

To build, equip and foster schools and colleges call for money. 
The only money available for denominational schools is fre,e will 
offerings from those who are able and willing to donate it for this 
purpose. 

23 



Where is the schools place and what is its sphere of work in the 
denominational lif.e? Evangelization primarily belongs to the 
Church. Indoctrination also belongs to the church. Discipline and 
ordinances are also duties of the Church. The 

Churches should rally to these things and not depend on the 
schools to do the work of the church. Only a small per cent of our 
youth attend High School, and a yet smaller per cent attend college, 
but all should bje taught these fundamental principles. Its up to the 
churches to look well to the evangelization of the boys and girls be- 
fore they enter our schools and colleges, so they will have a foun- 
dation, the foundation of Christ, to build upon. 

The high schools and colleges will find their place and sphere 
of work building on the foundation of faith laid by the church. 
Developing the mind and moulding the character at the most critical 
age of men and women. Make Christ the center of all ^earning. 
Truth, like parallel lines, never cross. While the mind is being 
trained in school, engaged in a search for truth, keep the heart an- 
chored in Christ. 

A. P. SORRELS. 

The Association then adjourned to meet with Montford's Cove 
Church on Wednesday befor.e the first Sunday in October, 1921. 

M. L. EDWARDS, Moderator. • 
J. A. McKAUGHAN Clerk. 

RESOLUTION OF THANKS 

Whereas the members of Old Fort Baptist Church have so kindly 
and generously entertained the d.elegates to the Green River Baptist 
Association, therefore be it resolved: 

That we the delegated of the Association tender to the Old 
Fort Baptist church and its pastor and members a vote of hearty 
thanks and appreciation for their splendid hospitality and kind 
thoughtfulness to us. On motion this resolution was adopted. 

REPORT ON WOMAN'S WORK 

*'The Lord reigneth, let th,e earth rejoice, let the multitude of 
isles be glad thereof." 

"The heavens declare His righteousness and all the people see 
His glory." 

We have come to the close of another year, befor.e we step into 
the new year let us review the past, see our errors and make th.em 
stepping stones to higher grounds, and the victories— let us rejoice 
and prais,e the Lord, who has given us the victory. "All the people 

24 



see His glory." 

The beginning of the year gave us an important task; a month 
of enlistment, a month of teaching stewardship, and the month of 
victory. We gladly, began the work of organizing, enlisting, in- 
forming and leading the women of our association to pray,er. Then 
we secured in cash and pledges $11,834.70 from 12 churches which 
reported to the . superintendent. Many other churches made good 
pledges and have reported as paying more than their part of this 
year's pledge. Six of the twelve churches, which reported to the 
superintendent have paid this year approximately $2,000. 

There ha%e been eight societies organized. Every organization 
has taken on new life, has a larger vision of the needs of the world 
— and seeing great opportunities has gone forward. 

Our work now is to follow up the work of the campaign. Are 
the women in our churches ready for it? Are we as well organized 
for cooperation as to be successful? Are we informed? Are we 
praying? Are we actively enlisted in God's service? Do we rea- 
lize our obligations as God's stewards? It is going to take good 
ori^anization to carry to completion the campaign work. The great 
task before us demanded work for some one, so the Woman's Mission- 
ary Union is going to get a Training School girl to work in our As- 
sociation during the three vacation months — paying her a salary and 
expens,es. We ask your support and help when she visits your 
church and the neighboring churches. We must continue the work 
of enlisting others in kingdom service and aiding in the Evangelistic 
campaign. 

The larger work of the kingdom demands the /energy and effort 
of every individual member of every Baptist church. The individual 
realizes th,e full joy of discipleship only when that individual has 
surrendered and consecrated life, effort and means. Individual en- 
listment is essential. "It brings one down face to face with the 
most sacred relationship of li:^e — that of facing God in a personal 
way for a fuller, richer salvation and for a larger and more fruit- 
ful service. Is this not worth while?" 

CLARA MORRIS, Supt. 

TREASURER'S REPORT 

Received and disbursed the following amounts for the following 
objects: 

75 Million Undesignated $ 63.05 

Minute Fund 102.20 

Total $165.25 

W. A. HARRILL, Treasurer. 

25 



CONSTITUTION 

No. 1. This Association shall be known as the Green River Bap- 
tist Association, and shall be composed of Baptist Churches whose ar- 
ticles of Faith and Constitutions are in harmony with those of the 
Association. 

No. 2. The membership shall be compos,ed of delegates elected 
by the Churches connected with this body, and all ordained minis- 
ters who are members of, or working as pastors in connection with 
said Churches and each Church shall be allowed a representation of 
two delegates for fifty members, and every Church of over fifty mem- 
bers shall be allowed one additional delegate for every additional 
fifty members. 

No. 3. The primary object of the Association shall be to en- 
courage and support Wake Forest College, to educate young men 
called of God to the Ministry and approved by the Churches to which 
they belong; to encourage education among the people of the State; 
to support the Gospel in the destitute portions of the State and of the 
Southern Baptist Conv,ention, to send the Gospel to the nations that 
have it not; to encourage the distribution, and study of the Bible and 
a sound religious literature to assist Baptist Churches in the erect- 
ion of houses of worship, to encourage the proper care of indigent 
orphan children, and destitute and aged ministers of the Gospel, to 
encourage the organization and support of Baptist Sunday Schools, ' 
and to cooperate with thq Baptist State Conv^ention in all its depart- 
ments of labor. 

No. 4. The Association shall meet annually on Wednesday be- 
fore the first Sabbath in October. 

No. 5. The officers of the Association shall be a Mod,erator,, 
Vice-Moderator, Clerk and Treasurer, who shall be elected by the As- 
sociation and continue in office until their successors ar,e elected. 

No. 6. The Moderator shall preside, or fill the chair, by calling 
some member of the body thereto, and enforce order in accordanc,©' 
with Mell's Parliamentary Practice. 

No. 7. The Clerk shall record the proceedings, conduct the cor- 
respondence, and publish and distribute the Minutes. 

No. 8. The Treasurer shall receive all funds contributed by the 
Churches or individuals to the object Of the Association,, receipting the 
contributors for the same; and forward all contributions to their 
proper destination, and make a full report of all receipts and dis- 
bursements to the Association at its annual session, and on retiring 
from his office turn over to his successor all moneys, papers and 
books belonging thereto. 

26 



No. 9. There shall be appointed by the Association at each ses- 
sion a Board of Missions and Sunday Schools, consisting of one mem- 
ber from each Church belonging to the Association, and other breth- 
ren living in Rutherfordton or its immediate vicinity, five of whom 
shall constitute a quorum, which during the intervals between the 
meetings of the Associations, shall have charge of the various inter- 
ests and objects fostered by the Association, and shall encourage the 
churches to give liberally thereto, and shall make a full report of its 
work including such suggestions relative thereto as it may think 
advisable to the Association at its annual sessions. 

No. 10. The President, or in case of his death or disqualification, 
any three members of the Board may call a meeting thereof. 

No. 11. This Constitution may be changed or amended at any 
annual session by two-thirds of the representatives voting in the af- 
firmative. 

ASSOCIATIONAL COVENANT 

Article 1. We believe in one only and true God, and that there 
are three persons in the Godhead — the Father, the Son, and Holy 
Ghost, and these are one in substance, and equal in power and glory. 

Article 2. We believe the Scriptures' of Old and New Testa- 
ments are the Word of God, and the only rule of faith and practice. 

Article 3. We believe in the doctrine of original sin. 

Article 4. We believe in man's impotency to recover himself 
from the fallen state he is in by his own free will and ability. 

Article 5. We believe that sinners ar^ justified in the sight of 
God only through the imputed righteousness of Jesus Christ. 

Article 6. We believe the saints shall persevere in grace, and 
that they never shall finally fall away. 

Article 7. We believe that Baptism and the Lord's Supper are 
ordinanc/es instituted by Christ and that true believers are the only 
proper subjects thereof. 

Article 8. We believe that immersion is the only Scriptural mode 
of Baptism. 

Article 9. We believe that no person has a right to administer 
the ordinances but such as are regularly called and qualified thereto. 

Article 10. We believ.e in the resurrection of the dead, and a 
general judgment ; that the punishment of the wicked shall be ever- 
lasting and the joys of the righteous eternal. 

27 



Article 11. We, the members of the Green River Baptist Associa- 
tion, agreeing to the above Articles of Faith, do, for and in behalf 
of the Churches which we represent, covenant and agree and give 
ourselves up to teach other in Church and Christian fellowship, in 
order to keep up the unity of the slpirit in the bonds of peace and to 
assist each other in all matters of distress and to pray for each oth- 
er's prosperity. 



28 



Table I--Statistical 



i ; 


PASTok 


POST-OFFICE 


CLERK 


POST-OFFICE 


c 

O cS 


le of Church 
operty 


GAINS 


CHURCH ■ 


S 




2 

.n 


I... .. ^ ^ 




{■■„:: ii , -: 




■ ■■ . ; ii , 


££ 

p 


> 




Armstrong 
Bethel 


J. M. Brown 


Nealsville 


F. P. Morgan 


Nealsville 


2 


$ 1500 




3 




Bethlehem 


C. P. Holland 


Old Fort 


W. B. Parker 


Old Fort 


2 


500 








Beulah 


J. T. Ruppe 


Rutherfordton 


John Owens 


Landrum, S. C. 


1 


1000 


3 


2 




Big Level 


C. G. Walker 


Mill Spring 


W. J. Wilson 


Mill Spring 


4 


500 








Bill's Creek 


N. L. Wright 


Harris 


Paul F. Searcy 


Uree 


1 


1200 


1 






Camp Creek 


J. H. Smith 


Fair Forest, S. C. 


J. W. Coveney 


Union Mills 


3 


1000 




1 




Cane Creek 


W. A. Morris 


Hendersonville 


Jas. P. Wilson 


Mill Spring- 


3 


500 


7 






Chapel Hill 


R. G. Short 


Marion 


A. M Swan 


Marion 


2&4 


600 




5 




Cherry Springs 


C. P. Holland 


Old Fort 


0. W. Robertson 


Old Fort 


3 


800 


13 


9 




Clear Creek 


W. F. McMahan 


Old Fort 


W. L. Quinn 


Old Fort 


2&4 


600 




2 




Cooper's Gap 


W. A. Morris 


Hendersonville 


J. L. Jackson 


Mill Spring 


3 


500 


3 


2 




Columbus 


E. J. Jones 


Tryon 


L. H. Cloud 


Columbus 


2& 4 


3000 








Clinchfield 


J. M. Brown 


Nealsville 


A. W. Henson 


Marion 


1 &3 


4500 




7 




Dysartsville 


Lee Jones 


Marion 


W. H. Taylor 


Dysartsville 


A 


1000 


12 


2 




East Marion 


R. G. Short 


Marion 


A. R, Owenby 


Marion 


2&4 






9 




Glen wood 


J. M. Brown 


Nealsville 


L. A. Raburn 


Nealsville 


2 


1500 


1 


7 




/Greenlee 


W. F. McMahan 


Old Kort 


J. M. Pendergrass 


Old Fort 


1 &3 










Green Hill 


B. M. Hamrick 


Rutherfordton 


H. M. Rucker 


Rutherfordton 


2 


2500 




8 




Harmony Grove 


F. L. Simmons 


Marion 


C. B. Morgan 


Marion 


1 


3000 


5 


2 




Macedonia 


J. L. Hodge 


Rutherfordton 


C. C. Lawing 


Vein Mountain 


1 


lOOD 


1 


2 




Marion First 


J. T. Bowden 


Marion 


W. R. Chambers 


Marion 


All time 


50,000 


39 


41 




Marion Second 


R. G. Short 


Marion 


Carl Lowery 


Marion 


1 &3 




8 


2 




Mill Spring 


E. J. Jones 


Tryon 


C. V. Lewis 


Mill Spring 


I &3 


1000 


2 


1 




Montford's Cove 


M. M. Huntley 


Rutherfordton 


E. S. Harris 


Union Mills 


3 


2500 


11 


8 




Mountain Creek 


M. L. Buchanan 


Union Mills 


H. P. Rucker 


Gilkey 


3 


2000 


16 


10 




Mount Vernon 


M. L. Buchanan 


Union Mills 


G. E. Morgan 


Rutherfordton 


2 &4 


2000 


14 






Mountain View 


J. T. Ruppe 


Rutherfordton 


J. T. .lack son 


Mill Spring 


4 


500 




1 




;: Mount Pleasant 


David Huntley 


Bear Wallow 


J. T. Bland 


Redtop 


4 


500 








" Nebo 


J. M. Brown 


Nealsville 


G. D. Taylor 


Nebo 


4 


1200 








Old Fort 


C. P. Holland 


Old Fort 


L L. Caplan 


Old Fort 


2 &4 


4000 








Piney Knob 




















Pleasant Grove 


E. P. White 


Rutherfordton 


R. Ledbetter 


Uree 


4 


1000 


7 


"8 




Pleasant Hill 


M. M. Huntley 


Rutherfordton 


L. B. Harris 


Rutherfordton 


2 


2000 




4 




Pea Ridge 


E. P. White 


Rutherfordton 


W. G. Green 


Mill Spring 


2 


1000 




2 




Piedmont 


W. M. Gold 


Ellenboro 


J. B. Flinn 


Rutherfordton 


2 


4500 


8 


3 




Packolett 


R. N. Pratt 


Hendersonville 


J. T. Panther 


Lvnn 












Rock Spring 


A. P. Sorrels 


Union Mills 


H. M. Whiteside 


Mill Spring 


3 


2000 


2 






Round Hill 


M. L. Buchanan 


Union Mills 


J. Worth Morgan 


Union Mills 


1 &3 


2485 


14 


13 




Rutherf ordton 


J. A. McKaughan 


Rutherfordton 


J. P, Lewis 


Rutherfordton 


All time 


20,000 


20 


29 




Stone Mountain 


C. P. Holland 


Old Fort 


J. L Nanney 


Black Mountain 


3 






8 




Stmny Vale 


B. B. Styles 


Cone River 


J. P. Padgett 


Busick 


4 




6 






Silver Creek 


W. F. McMahan 


Old Fort 


L L. Caplan 


Old Fort 


2 


2000 




9 




Turkey Cove 






H. A. Lowery 


Sevier 




300 








Whitesides Valley 


H. R. Freeman 


Rutherfordton 


Guilford Nanney 


Uree 


4 


1000 


7 


1 




Woodlawn 


F. L. Simmons 


Nebo 


W. V. Hollifield 


Sevier 


3 


800 








Oak Spring 


E. P. White 


Rutherfordton 


F. L. Pendergrass 


Rutherfordton 


] 


: 1400 


1 


15 




:We$t Point 


J. L. Hodge 


Rutherfordton 




















$27,385 


201 


216 


1 



Table II— Financial 





m 








^ 


O w 


xn 


xn 














3 

c 

t— 1 


% 
C 


1 

4) 


C 


a 

■3 

o 

u 
a? 

o 


as 

O CO 


State and Ass 
ciational Mi 
sions 


o 

1 

s 

£ 

O 


.2 

to 
to 

s 
1 


1 
1 

s 

m 


1 

o 


i 

11 

r 


CO 

\ 


1 


1 


$23 23 


$16 43 




$3 00 




$208 35 










$13 05 








$364 06 


25 00 


15 00 




3 00 






$3 00 


$5 00 






7 50 








290 55 


6 00 


6 00 




1 40 






184 00 




3 00 


$3 00 




2 00 
6 00 




$2 00 




64 40 
246 00 


26 61 


4 55 




2 65 


$266 


13 


121 75 


















528 94 
118 70 


) 


24 75 


$32 00 




22 


04 


20 75 


















365 34 


J 12 30 


12 36 
35 00 
50 03 


10 00 


3 00 


84 

38 

4 


95 
00 
31 


84 95 
168 00 
234 55 










9 00 








301 90 
474 70 
480 00 




2 00 




1 10 




37 00 


















115 10 


20 00 


20 00 




1 75 




277 99 


















528 25 


44 60 


110 00 




4 00 




202 74 


















640 50 


74 05 


10 00 




2 00 




149 95 


5 00 








71 65 








477 65 


12 00 


93 05 
29 19 




4 00 
3 50 


132 00 


56 36 
183 25 








$13 87 


44 60 
32 56 








642 01 
462 37 


) 5 15 


15 00 


6 66 


1 50 


18 


75 


53 93 


















301 99 




54 14 


10 25 


2 20 






178 21 








^ 


39 10 


$1 24 






471 17 


I 3 28 






2 00 




45 00 


20 00 


20 00 


20 00 




44 86 


10 00 


10 00 




527 86 


33 85 




39 00 


2 00 




18 60 










2L 15 




5 00 




216 65 


3 394 68 


111 12 




10 00 




1, 42 68 










194 95 








4,842 42 


12 00 






3 00 




48 30 


















313 30 


) 25 00 


15 00 








235 00 


















775 00 




10 45 




4 40 




148 15 


1 74 


2 00 


2 00 




4 00 








474 00 


75 79 


19 85 




5 35 




320 15 










10 00 








671 32 


71 00 


81 00 






248 80 


563 62 


38 12 


43 84 


39 72 




77 68 


14 16 






1,606 94 


3 25 


1 50 

2 00 
14 81 


18 00 


1 00 
50 


3 25 


23 00 


75 


1 00 


1 00 




1 50 








100 00 
46 25 
14 81 


[) 39 00 


129 04 
10 00 




3 00 
1 65 


1J3 87 
20 00 


307 37 

58 62 










18 40 
2 60 


26 55 
24 00 






»1,145 33 
221 25 


12 00 


9 25 




3 25 




227 50 


















413 18 


13 50 


8 00 




1 50 




20 00 










5 00 




5 00 




153 00 


a 56 69 


36 60 
6 60 




3 35 
2 10 




187 00 
208 62 


20 49 
6 00 


50 00 


10 24 


36 40 


66 30 


52 00 
27 53 


5 50 




1,159 41 
388 35 


23 81 


48 76 


7 50 


10 00 






108 20 


75 00 


75 00 






3,107 36 








3 768 77 


163 43 
11 64 

10 00 


40 00 


10 00 
1 00 

1 00 

2 00 


255 09 
49 00 


49 32 
27 00 


166 43 


260 37 


258 86 




212 94 


829 40 


50 00 


$20 00 


5,078 61 

152 96 

76 97 

229 00 

122 00 





3 00 




2 00 






5 00 








5 20 








177 20 


"» 


25 00 








5 57 










4 48 


$4,092 24 


7 95 




1,420 82 


7 $2,060 50 


$1,214 55 


SI 63 41 


$102 20 


$1,256 19 


$6,857 28 


$370 23 


$460 21 


$409 82 


$50 27 


$722 52 


$84 45 


$20 00 


$27,220 25 



JNothing reported. T| Not represented. 



New church. 









Table III— Sunday Schools 










1 >CHURCH 


SUPERINTEN- 
DENT 


POST-OFFICE 


SECRETARY 


POST-OFFICE 


o 

C/2 


1^ 




4J 

c 
6 




2 c 


i 

So 

M O 












o 

d 




p2 

3 


„ 2 

IS 


1" 
1^ 




■p 


1 ' 










Z 


O 


Ph h 


o 


S 


m 


i Arm strong 
Bethel 


M. C. Morgan 


Nealsville 


F. E. Lawing 


Nealsville 




9 


81 


88 


48 


12 




iBethlehem 


J. F. Turner 


Old Fort 


C. C. Silver 


Old Fort 




6 


100 


105 


75 


12 




\ Beulah 


Jack Halbert 


Tryon 


Roy Jones 


Landrum, S. C. 




6 




42 


26 


12 


2 


Big Level 


L. P. Gilbert 


Mill Spring 


Bernice Wilson 


Mill Spring, N. C. 




5 


30 


35 


15 


6 




i Bill's Creek 


Dannie Gilbert 


Uree 


Klotilda Frady 


Uree 




4 


48 


60 


30 


6 




Camp Creek 


No S. S. reported 






















Cane Creek 


B. F. Jones 


Uree 


M. A. Searcy 


Mill Spring 




8 


50 


58 


30 


12 


7 


Chapel Hill 


T. J. Swan 


Marion 


M. A. Poteet 


Marion 




6 


30 


36 


15 


12 




! Cherry Springs 


B. L. Robertson 


Old Fort 


Ora Bradley 


Old Fort 




9 


100 


109 


60 


12 


9 


1 Clear Creek 


W. D. Long 


Old Fort 


Addie Quinn 


Old Fort 




7 


112 


119 


87 


12 




1 Cooper's Gap 


No S. S. reported 






















Columbus 


J. P. Arledge 


Columbus 


Mattie Tallant 


Columbus 




8 


60 


69 




12 




Clinchfield 


0. C. Copeland 


Marion 


A. U. Wall 


Marion 




9 


125 


134 


25 


12 




Dysartsville 


W. H. Taylor 


Dysartsville 


F. C. Davies 


Dysartsville 




4 


50 


54 


20 


12 


3 


East Marion 


G. C. Hall 


Marion 


A. R. Owenby 


Marion 




8 




152 


25 


12 


3 


Glenwood 


E. S. Brown 


Marion 


Carl Swann 


Nealsville 




8 


60 


68 


40 


12 




Green Hill 


J. P. Jones 


Rutherfordton 


James Rucker 


Rutherfordton 




5 


25 


30 


20 


12 




Greenlee 


J- M. Pendergrass 


Old Fort 


Hattie Pendergrass 


Old Fort 




8 


68 


76 


32 


12 




Harmony Grove 


W. W. Huskins 


Marion 


Carl Simmons 


Nebo 




6 


45 


51 


27 


12 


4 


Macedonia 


No S. S. reported 






















Marion First 


J. M. Tyler 


Marion 


Miss Hattie Gladden 


Marion 




12 


175 


187 


120 


12 


37 


Marion Second 


No S. S. reported 






















Mill Spring 


J. H. Gibbs 


Mill Spring 


C. V. Lewis 


Mill Spring 




8 


50 


58 


20 


12 


2 


i Montford's Cove 


M. R. Nanney 


Nealsville 


Hicks Hemphill 


Union Mills 




10 


105 


115 


80 


12 


5 


Mountain Creek 


J. S. Hampton 


Union Mills 


H. P. Rucker 


Gilkey 




7 


80 


87 


70 


12 


12 


Mount Vernon 


W. L. Edgerton 


Rutherfordton 


S. G. Walker 


Rutherfordton 




11 


81 


125 


50 


12 


11 


Mountain View 


J. G. Corn 


Mill Spring 


Alice McCraine 


Mill Spring 




6 


15 


21 


12 


6 




' Mount Pleasant 


E. W. Hill 


Redtop 


Dijer Hall 


Redtop 




6 


25 


31 


15 


6 




Nebo 


G. D. Taylor 


Nebo 


Miss Bettie Bowman 


Nebo 




3 


30 


33 




12 




Old Fort 


R. F. Hughes 


Old Fort 


J. R. Early 


Old Fort 




10 


130 


140 


50 


12 




Piney Knob 


No letter 






















Pleasant Grove 


W. L. Bland 


Rutherfordton 


R. M. McDaniel 


Uree 




5 


50 


55 




12 


7 


Pleasant Hill 


J. B. Guffy 


Rutherfordton 


Mamie Whitesides 


Rutherfordton 




8 


40 


49 


20 


9 




Pea Ridge 


E. L. McDade 


Mill Spring 


Wanda McDade 


Mill Spring 




5 


50 


56 


30 


9 




Piedmont 


G. W. Hodge 


Rutherfordton 


C. W. Hodge 


Rutherfordton 




10 


90 


100 


50 


12 


5 


Packolett 


Mo S. S. reported 






















\ Rock Spring 


C. D. Earley 


Mill Spring 


Lona Whiteside 


Uree 




5 


25 


30 


21 


9 


1 


Round Hill 


J. W. Morgan 


Union Mills 








9 


166 


175 


134 


12 


14 


Rutherfordton 


J. Lloyd Taylor 


Rutherfordton 


R. R. Flack 


Rutherfordton 




17 


150 


175 


60 


12 


16 


Stone Mountain 


R. C. Nanney 


Old Fort 


Charles Painter 


Old Fort 




7 


23 


30 


20 


12 




Silver Creek 


N. B. Arledge 


Mill Spring 


Frank Green 


Mill Spring 




6 


54 


60 


43 






Turkey Cove 
























j Whitesides Valley 


G. Nanney 


Uree 


R. G. Searcey 


Chimney Rock 




7 


60 


67 


30 


12 


7 


' "Woodlawn 


J. R. Baxter 


Sevier 


J. H. Huskins 


Sevier 




5 


26 


31 


18 


12 




' Oak Spring ' 


G. W. Johnson 


Rutherfordton 


F. L. Pendergrass 


Rutherfordton 




7 


51 


58 




12 


1 












36 


280 


2652 


3769 


1418 




146 



Table IV — Woman's Missionary Union 























c 






• ' 


S 


1 




1 




1 






^NIZATION 


PRESIDENT 


POST-OFFIGE 


'S 


^.^ 




pc] 


0) 


m 


1q 


4J 








u 


o <u 


«5 


c« 


rt 

c 




O 


o 






1 




^5 


o 


II 


03 

$-1 


'I 


u 


13 
o 








'^ 


^ 


s 


O 


O 


H 


O 


H 


ary Society 


Mrs. Ada Padgett 


Old Fort 


27 


$23 90 












$23 90 


ary Society 


Miss Delia Hyder 


Rutherfordton 


11 


23 10 












23 10 


ary Society 


Mrs. C. C. Fisher 


Marion 


23 


38 10 


$5 10 








$88 90 


132 20 


ary Society 


Mrs. J. T. Bowden 


Marion 


22 


391 95 












391 95 


ary Society 


Mrs. John Wells 


Forest City 


45 


194 71 




$9 44 


$4 72 


$4 72 


4 72 


218 31 


ary Society 


Mrs. J. D. Whitesides 


Rutherfordton 


20 


40 30 












40 30 


ary Society 


Mrs. B. Y. Allison 


Old Fort 


22 


39 27 


71 30 




18 40 


26 55 


113 87 


269 39 


ary Society 


Mrs. A. P. Sorrels 


Union Mills 


36 


194 30 




70 75 








265 05 


ary Society 


Mrs. J. Lloyd Taylor 


Rutherfordton 
Totals 






281 85 


56 40 


26 25 


15 00 


20 70 


400 20 






$945 63 


$358 25 


$136 59 


$49 37 


$46 27 


$228 19 


$1865 50